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Bit-perfect CD ripping - Page 4

post #46 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poimandres View Post

 

What exactly is your issue? Are you ripping an original cd or a burnt copy? If you are ripping from a copy and that copy was not ripped accurately and then burnt accurately including the cue sheet and drive offsets you will not be able to achieve a bit perfect rip. If you are ripping an original and you would like to recreate bit perfect copies will will also need the drive offsets set up properly and the cue sheet, currently this is where eac has the advantage as dbpa does not create cues. Personally I use dbpa and have never had any issues recreating as long as everything is setup correctly and you have the cue file.

 

I am ripping a CD I burnt myself with an arbitrarily chosen sound file. My goal is to get a ripped file, which, converted to WAV, is identical to the original source file. If there is anything wrong witht his approach please let me know.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stokitw View Post

For perfectly Burn your ripped CD from EAC, you have to setup the burner's offset too.

And preferably, you can use EAC's burning tool which can utilize cue sheet.

For just ripping the bit-perfect wav, you only need read offset.

 

It seems like you didn't setup write offset,


No, I have not knowingly set up write offset. If this is the problem, how should I do it? Should I do it in EAC or Burrrn? Again I'm not trying to recreate a CD that I have previously ripped, I'm trying to make an audio track ripped from a CD to resemble the original audio track the CD was burned from.

post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarcalion View Post


No, I have not knowingly set up write offset. If this is the problem, how should I do it? Should I do it in EAC or Burrrn? Again I'm not trying to recreate a CD that I have previously ripped, I'm trying to make an audio track ripped from a CD to resemble the original audio track the CD was burned from.


Ok, but why? If that's your goal, you can use dbpoweramp to rip an accurate *.wav file, then burn that to CD.  I don't understand why you're going all around Robin Hood's Barn. (Something my grandmother used to say.)

post #48 of 58

This is getting very, very stupid and I no longer care...... *unsubscribe*
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tarcalion View Post

I am ripping a CD I burnt myself with an arbitrarily chosen sound file. My goal is to get a ripped file, which, converted to WAV, is identical to the original source file. If there is anything wrong witht his approach please let me know.

post #49 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post

 

Ok, but why? If that's your goal, you can use dbpoweramp to rip an accurate *.wav file, then burn that to CD.  I don't understand why you're going all around Robin Hood's Barn. (Something my grandmother used to say.)

 

I'm burning a file and when I rip the CD I want the resulting file to be identical, simply as a way of seeing that my ripping method works at all. (Which is something I should be aware of before ripping a CD to reburn. ph34r.gif)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy View Post

This is getting very, very stupid and I no longer care...... *unsubscribe*

 

I fail to see what makes it so stupid. If you have a better way of checking my rips you could let me know instead of insulting my intelligence.

 

I don't think what I'm doing is very stupid.

yeah.jpg

This overly illustrative image admittedly is ...

 

I'm not trying to bother or insult anyone. I'm just a kid who wants to make sure EAC works out for him. Right now it doesn't seem to.

post #50 of 58

Ok, so you want to verify your methodology at home, using foobar2000, rather than trust AccurateRip (the checking system in both EAC and dbpoweramp).

 

That makes no sense to me.

post #51 of 58

Well, it's write offset problem just like I said.

 

Offset does not really affect the music part.

 

Let's say there is one track looks like this:

(case A)

.....REAL MUSIC DATA IS HERE...

 

With read offset correctly set and secure ripping, you should be able to get the result above.

So the file you ripped will have the same CRC as those of files who ripped with correct read offset.

This is how Accuraterip works.

 

On the contrary, if you do not set offset correctly, your track may look like this:

(case B)

..REAL MUSIC DATA IS HERE......

or this

(case C)

.......REAL MUSIC DATA IS HERE..

All these won't have the same CRC, so you cannot utilize Accuraterip.

However, the real music data should be the same as long as you use secure rip.

 

Without setting correct write offset, you will end up write the track look like case B or C even if your rip is exactly case A.

 

You should not worry about this if you're working track by track since the REAL MUSIC DATA IS HERE is intact.

Read/Write offset matters most when you're trying to perfectly copy CD.

Given the wide spread of Accuraterip, Read offset is again important so you can compare your data with accuraterip database.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tarcalion View Post



Quote:

Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post

 

Ok, but why? If that's your goal, you can use dbpoweramp to rip an accurate *.wav file, then burn that to CD.  I don't understand why you're going all around Robin Hood's Barn. (Something my grandmother used to say.)

 

I'm burning a file and when I rip the CD I want the resulting file to be identical, simply as a way of seeing that my ripping method works at all. (Which is something I should be aware of before ripping a CD to reburn. ph34r.gif)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy View Post

This is getting very, very stupid and I no longer care...... *unsubscribe*

 

I fail to see what makes it so stupid. If you have a better way of checking my rips you could let me know instead of insulting my intelligence.

 

I don't think what I'm doing is very stupid.

yeah.jpg

This overly illustrative image admittedly is ...

 

I'm not trying to bother or insult anyone. I'm just a kid who wants to make sure EAC works out for him. Right now it doesn't seem to.

post #52 of 58

Digging up an old thread here.

 

Would I be creating a bit-perfect rip if I used EAC to create a CUE file, mounted that with Daemon Tools, and imported to Apple Lossless with iTunes?

 

The reason I want to do this is that Gracenote's tagging IMO is excellent and free if I import through iTunes.

 

 

So would this method be creating bit-perfect copies, or is it still like directly importing with iTunes?

post #53 of 58

Make sure your offset is set up correctly in EAC, Daemon Tools will have an offset of 0 so it won't effect your mount and rip. You're feeding a perfect source in so the only thing that could mess up the rips is how itunes works with gaps and HTOA tracks.

post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Man_Eating_Duck View Post
 

Make sure your offset is set up correctly in EAC, Daemon Tools will have an offset of 0 so it won't effect your mount and rip. You're feeding a perfect source in so the only thing that could mess up the rips is how itunes works with gaps and HTOA tracks.

 

dBpoweramps' PerfecTUNES is also telling me the rips are accurate when using this method (EAC > CUE > Apple Lossless via iTunes), so I guess it works.  I know it would just be easier to use EAC directly but I like iTunes' tagging system so much better.

post #55 of 58

Do you know any software capable as EAC or dbpoweramp that works in Mac?

post #56 of 58
try XLD
post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxvz View Post
 

Do you know any software capable as EAC or dbpoweramp that works in Mac?


Max or XLD are the recommended ones for Mac.

post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hogger129 View Post
 


Max or XLD are the recommended ones for Mac.

I found some instability(unstable I don't know how to say it in English) issues with Max, so I decided to go with XLD and it has been working really good. Thanks ! :atsmile:

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