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Windows Phone 7 - Page 6

post #76 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougofTheAbaci View Post

I wouldn't say many, many. I'd say some people. ;)

 

When I was playing around with one for the first time I found it took some getting used to as I was familiar with iOS where things are just so **** obvious. It took a few moments to figure out what to do but once I had it wasn't that big of a problem. I got the feeling that once I was comfortable with it that it would be very easy to utilize. Though, in my professional opinion the difference between a good UI and a great UI is a good UI is very easy to use once you're used to it and a great UI doesn't have that learning curve.


True.  Just most of the reviews I've read by folks and publications I actually trust seem to place WP7 over iOS.  Not talking about PC World or Computer Shopper either.  >.<

 

post #77 of 125

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post

True.  Just most of the reviews I've read by folks and publications I actually trust seem to place WP7 over iOS.  Not talking about PC World or Computer Shopper either.  >.<

 

 

True, but I always take the, "This is better than X," reviews with a grain of salt, especially depending on the reviewer. For example, someone like Gizmodo is going to go out of it's way to say anyone is better than iOS. A lot of people want something to be better than iOS and will push anything even if it's not all that much better.

 

I'd say WP7 is good competition, but not better. And I can cite reasons for that. The only one I think might have stood a chance to be better was WebOS... *Sigh*

post #78 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougofTheAbaci View Post

 

The only one I think might have stood a chance to be better was WebOS... *Sigh*


Lol, I was going to jump on the Pre bandwagon when it came out until I discovered it had no removable storage.  tongue.gif

 

post #79 of 125
WebOS might not be dead yet. I think HP moved 350k units in a few days. Instant userbase.

I doubt HP will put anything more into it, but if a community picks up, HP would probably be happy to sell it to an upstart who might take another crack at it. 350k users could provide enough revenue to keep it alive in a niche.
post #80 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

WebOS might not be dead yet. I think HP moved 350k units in a few days. Instant userbase.

I doubt HP will put anything more into it, but if a community picks up, HP would probably be happy to sell it to an upstart who might take another crack at it. 350k users could provide enough revenue to keep it alive in a niche.


Ah, the problem w/ those Touchpads is most are going to be ported to Android.  Those that aren't being scalped on Ebay that is.

 

There's this:

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/TouchPad-webOS-Honeycomb-Gingerbread-Rootzwiki,news-12245.html

This:

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/Windows-Phone-7-WebOS-Developers-Tools-Free-Phones,news-12241.html

 

The real mystery is why did HP buy WebOS so quickly and give up just as fast.  Now they are pondering an exit from PCs altogether.  So two questions arise.  How much money is HP bleeding and/or what do they know that they have decided to concentrate on that others may have missed?

 

post #81 of 125

In a word: Patents.

 

No, seriously. The number of acquisitions that are going on in the tech industry right now for no better reason than patents is just pathetic. Perfect example being the Motorola Mobility acquisition by Google. Google doesn't need a hardware devision. Doesn't want a hardware devision. Has stated on numerous occasions that MM will be allowed to proceed as business as usual. They wanted the thousands of patents MM holds in the tech space.

 

I think you over-estimate the number of people buying TouchPads. At least, the number who are geeks who are only banking on it being something you can port to Android. The only reason I'd do it is so I could have an Android testing device but I'm just as likely to keep it on WebOS. Actually, the more I think about it the more I like the idea of running Ubuntu on it as I could use it to control an Ubuntu-powered NAS, which would be pretty sweet.

post #82 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougofTheAbaci View Post

I wouldn't say many, many. I'd say some people. wink.gif

 

When I was playing around with one for the first time I found it took some getting used to as I was familiar with iOS where things are just so **** obvious. It took a few moments to figure out what to do but once I had it wasn't that big of a problem. I got the feeling that once I was comfortable with it that it would be very easy to utilize. Though, in my professional opinion the difference between a good UI and a great UI is a good UI is very easy to use once you're used to it and a great UI doesn't have that learning curve.


I'd say most people who have used it prefer it. To me iOS is like using windows 95.

Also, putting Android on the Touchpad would be a major downgrade. Android is pretty awful on tablets (and phones, IMHO). I've been using an android phone for a year and a half now, and I hate pretty much everything about it.
Edited by revolink24 - 8/24/11 at 9:44am
post #83 of 125

I'm debating over whether to try installing WP7 on my HD2 (currently running WM 6.5).

post #84 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpelg View Post

I'm debating over whether to try installing WP7 on my HD2 (currently running WM 6.5).



If you can than I'd recommend it. It's the difference of going from Windows 2000 to Windows 7.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by revolink24 View Post

I'd say most people who have used it prefer it. To me iOS is like using windows 95.

Also, putting Android on the Touchpad would be a major downgrade. Android is pretty awful on tablets (and phones, IMHO). I've been using an android phone for a year and a half now, and I hate pretty much everything about it.


I haven't gotten that impression by the people I've talked to. WP7 does have some UI quirks they need to figure out. It's clever and Microsoft did do something very interesting with it, but it's not up to iOS just yet, in terms of speed or security.

 

I do agree with your statements on Android, however. It's bad on tablets and only marginally better on phones. It's a messy OS and the version and UI fragmentation that plagues the community isn't helping.

post #85 of 125

I found WP7 completely intuitive. I haven't personally met a single person who doesn't. It had no learning curve at all for me. iOS is certainly a lot more developed and supported but take the aps away from both and leave the basic phone features and functions out of the box and WP7 is simply better for me. The live tiles and the integration alone make it a more advanced creature than the iPhone at its core. There's still plenty it should be doing it isn't, and even when Mango comes which is sorting a lot of it out, there is still more obvious things I want to see, but at its core I think its the best UI of the three. Just needs fleshing out.

post #86 of 125

If it's any consolation, I work as a waiter during the weekend, and I saw a guy with a windows 7 phone. Looked insanely hot. I had to ask him what it was (because I'd never seen one before). Looks like something out of star trek.


Edited by Revi - 8/24/11 at 2:34pm
post #87 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revi View Post

Looks like something out of star trek.


Which one?

This  images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT9tAHoHxOs75ySkVtEyBCzPquBgrK20z8pvcR0zY0Ysdiy6tMe or Z tongue.gif

 

post #88 of 125

Honestly, does it really matter? Technically, both look dated now. That's the best part about sci-fi. It always looks dated after a decade or so. The only possible example of something that's held up is Minority Report, but that's because they had some actual UI guys come in and design a theoretical interface. That movie is relatively old now but we still haven't gotten quite to that level yet.

 

Rather impressive, really.

 

As for intuitiveness, it's not an exact science. What works for one doesn't work for another. All I'm saying is that on the whole the UI could be more intuitive. It breaks a lot of new ground and while that's really cool and interesting, what people don't like to hear is that's exactly what you don't want to do if you want to be usable. The trick is striking a balance.

post #89 of 125

I would prefer a TOS-like UI if we were in a war. Real knobs, buttons, switches on metal. As for the TNG interface, I can just see a young Wesley Crusher (or horny Commander Riker checking out a cute relief navigator) accidentally resting his hand against the glass touchscreen and unintentionally firing a photon torpedo on the starship of an alien peace emissary.


Edited by purrin - 8/24/11 at 10:55pm
post #90 of 125

Doug,

You're being incredibly vague in your criticisms and it makes it hard to take them seriously. You haven't actually given an example at all. You've said iOS has more "speed and security" without detailing at all what that means. Now you've said the actual problem with WP7 is it does too much new and that confuses people. Ultimately, you tell us, it could be more intuitive, but stop short on giving any detail as to how or why. 

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