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Grado Fan Club! - Page 653

post #9781 of 27741
Thanks for both of your opinions! smily_headphones1.gif

I was never going to do more than 4 holes anyway, but I think that given the information that Wayne provided, I will stick to 3.
I guess that if I don't like it then it's tough luck! :P
Hoping to get some magnums for my birthday and some cups to follow! smily_headphones1.gif
post #9782 of 27741

I have spent the last 6 years hating my 325i's. I bought them, and they gave me a headache. I ran them in for a week. The piercing treble peaks seems to spike my head with pure pain and all I wanted to do was turn them down. And I would keep turning them down until I could hear nothing coming from them, and only at that point was I happy.

 

I shoved them into a drawer and that was the end of them. Since then I just used my DAP and Westones.

 

Recently, I was clearing out the garage, and wanted to make sure that all my CDs were ripped properly before I chucked them (some were done before I got the hang of EAC/Flac). Working at the computer, I dug out the old Grados. Still as nasty as ever. But something made me persevere...

 

Firstly I bought a little Fiio E17. This DAC/Amp at least allowed the Grados to be powered nicely from the PC.

Then in Foobar I installed a parametric EQ. With a sine wave generator I sniffed out the 3 massive treble peaks, and EQ'd them out in Foobar. I also slipped in a 2dB gently lump in the lower bass. I noticed that the 3 treble peaks were at the exact same frequencies as measured here, although I only applied a tiny cut to the 9K one, because perceptually it sounded about right.

 

I have never heard anything that sounds so good. The detail, soundstage and sheer transparency is astounding. And I can turn them up! Flicking the DSP on and off makes the cans sound like an old transistor radio. The peaks are so obvious.

 

Gutted I didn't do this before, and would recommend it to anyone.

post #9783 of 27741

the G cush are way more comfortable than any of the other pads are to me.

 

they don't really lack bass, even though it is less in front. i think this has to do with the distance between your ear and the speaker.

once you get used to this, it's still very satisfying to listen with. (my opinion)

post #9784 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by CH23 View Post

the G cush are way more comfortable than any of the other pads are to me.

they don't really lack bass, even though it is less in front. i think this has to do with the distance between your ear and the speaker.
once you get used to this, it's still very satisfying to listen with. (my opinion)

I agree to some extent. Out of the five or six Grado/Alessandro's I've had, the MS ones and 225's are the two that retained quality with G cush pads.

The MS ones, which were later modded to MS one thousands certainly had more space with the pads, although I did have to drive them a little more to maintain the bass quality. The 225's responded largely the same. More space less bass.

Is it a coincidence that these two are arguably the most mellow of the family? I think not.
post #9785 of 27741

A brief update on my Ear Zonk pad experience.

 

L-Cush.  Excellent.  Soft, Great Fit, etc.

 

G-Cush.  Eh?  Soft, Fit on ear is great.  However the openings where the pad should attach to the cup are actually two different sizes.  One stays on, the other doesn't when these are placed on my headphone stand.

 

I'll reach out to Ear Zonk today and inquire about the issue - as opposed to going through Amazon and potentially getting another "mixed" pair of G-Cush.  I'm not giving up on Ear Zonk considering the L-Cush variant is 1/2 the cost of the actual Grado pads.  The G-Cush sell for $19.99, which is also better in cost than the $45.00 G-Cush from Grado.

post #9786 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by wje View Post
 

A brief update on my Ear Zonk pad experience.

 

L-Cush.  Excellent.  Soft, Great Fit, etc.

 

G-Cush.  Eh?  Soft, Fit on ear is great.  However the openings where the pad should attach to the cup are actually two different sizes.  One stays on, the other doesn't when these are placed on my headphone stand.

 

I'll reach out to Ear Zonk today and inquire about the issue - as opposed to going through Amazon and potentially getting another "mixed" pair of G-Cush.  I'm not giving up on Ear Zonk considering the L-Cush variant is 1/2 the cost of the actual Grado pads.  The G-Cush sell for $19.99, which is also better in cost than the $45.00 G-Cush from Grado.


Got a friend in the US (I'm in the UK) to order me some G-cush pads from Ear Zonk... You've not exactly filled me with confidence about them now :blink:
The grado variants of the G-cush are around the £50 mark over here, so about $80... Nearly as much as a pair of SR60i's over there!

post #9787 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJWorne View Post
 


Got a friend in the US (I'm in the UK) to order me some G-cush pads from Ear Zonk... You've not exactly filled me with confidence about them now :blink:
The grado variants of the G-cush are around the £50 mark over here, so about $80... Nearly as much as a pair of SR60i's over there!

 

The Ear Zonk web site indicates that to handle issues with the pads, the purchaser should go through Amazon to get the issue resolved (pads replaced, returned, etc.).  However, the Ear Zonk web site also has a support number: 1-888-505-2807.  I will be giving them a call shortly since they are in a time zone two hours later than I am.  I'll provide updates to this issue / item.  The reason for me wanting to contact them directly is that I don't want to go through Amazon to get a replacement while the same bin that Amazon pulls them from could have been a bad lot with the sizing issue.  I suspect when the returns happen, there might be a disconnect between Amazon and Ear Zonk to fully communicate the true cause of the return.  In this case, Amazon is just fulfilling and shipping these items for Ear Zonk, based on customer purchases of the pads.

 

If we seek replacements, then I believe they should be from a different lot, and one which does not have such issues.

post #9788 of 27741

Keep us posted :)
Any chance of a picture of the pads?
Can you see the difference?

post #9789 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnottj View Post
 

Get an Alessandro MS1i with L Cush pads, which will be almost as good as the 225i for less than half the cost. I've got both and, while there is a difference (and I do think the 225i is slightly better overall), it's not 'night and day' to my ears, but much more subtle.  MS1i with L Cush pads is a hell of a pair of headphones for the money ...


2nd that.  I own the 80i, MS1, and 225i and used all three with the L-Cush pads.  The MS1 is closer to the 225i than the 80i IMO.  So if buying new get the MS1, or get the 225i second hand.

post #9790 of 27741

OK so I decided to just go for it and vent my SR125i... I stuck three holes in there... and as Wayne says: "Unmodified = Not worth Listening to" ;)
The bass has slightly more presence and mids seems relatively unchanged, however the highs seem to have been tamed a little bit... which is a bit of a shame because I really liked how bright these headphones were.  

Of course, this is all speculative and may well be a placebo effect!
Will report back in a few days if anyone is interested :)


Edited by SJWorne - 10/11/13 at 8:39am
post #9791 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJWorne View Post
 

OK so I decided to just go for it and vent my SR125i... I stuck three holes in there... and as Wayne says: "Unmodified = Not worth Listening to" ;)
The bass has slightly more presence and mids seems relatively unchanged, however the highs seem to have been tamed a little bit... which is a bit of a shame because I really liked how bright these headphones were.  

Of course, this is all speculative and may well be a placebo effect!
Will report back in a few days if anyone is interested :)

I did the same to my first pair of 80i's and was also disappointed with the decrease in the high frequencies which is one of the things I love about the 80's. I also felt that they lost their aggression. Like an idiot I filled the holes with hot glue (don't do this) and the glue leaked down onto the diaphragm of the drivers, and I was left with only high frequencies, so I had to buy new ones. I should have used a dot of felt to cover the holes.

post #9792 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJWorne View Post
 

Keep us posted :)
Any chance of a picture of the pads?
Can you see the difference?

 

Yes, and Yes.  This weekend, I should be home in the daylight so I can take some relatively decent pictures of the L-Cush pads and the G-Cush pads side-by-side with the actual Grado pads.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJWorne View Post
 

OK so I decided to just go for it and vent my SR125i... I stuck three holes in there... and as Wayne says: "Unmodified = Not worth Listening to" ;)
The bass has slightly more presence and mids seems relatively unchanged, however the highs seem to have been tamed a little bit... which is a bit of a shame because I really liked how bright these headphones were.

Of course, this is all speculative and may well be a placebo effect!
Will report back in a few days if anyone is interested :)

 

I gave this some thought early this morning.  In regards to 3 holes, normally most of us have used a ball point pen to open up the holes all the way, while carefully trying not to push the pen in too deep to hit the actul driver.  My thought was, I wondered if attacking 3 holes initially but with smaller hole openings as opposed to going all the way?  I think in this situation, one could then enlarge them a bit more to then test the sound again.  This might still provide the best of both worlds.  For those who want a bit more bass, as well as for those who want to retain the detail without it retreating a bit.

 

I've left a voice mail message with Ear Zonk.  When i hear back from them, I'll provide updates.

post #9793 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnottj View Post
 

 

Where are you based? In Europe, for example, I 'm not convinced the price difference makes the 225i worthwhile, unless you buy used.

 

Get an Alessandro MS1i with L Cush pads, which will be almost as good as the 225i for less than half the cost. I've got both and, while there is a difference (and I do think the 225i is slightly better overall), it's not 'night and day' to my ears, but much more subtle.  MS1i with L Cush pads is a hell of a pair of headphones for the money ...

The 225i have better pads (L-Cush), better matched drivers, better airflow (wire grills) and a better cable with 1/8 plug.

If I was using at home (non-portable system) I would spring for the 225i.

If I was using with portable system the 80i or MS1 are fine, especially as you then don't need 3.5mm adapter - but you'll likely end up buying the L-Cush pads anyway...

post #9794 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post
 

The 225i have better pads (L-Cush), better matched drivers, better airflow (wire grills) and a better cable with 1/8 plug.

If I was using at home (non-portable system) I would spring for the 225i.

If I was using with portable system the 80i or MS1 are fine, especially as you then don't need 3.5mm adapter - but you'll likely end up buying the L-Cush pads anyway...

 

I've grown to realize that there are some people who don't like the 8-conductor Grado cable.  A few years back, I thought the cable was the end-all, be-all, but not as much lately.  I guess my feelings changed since I'm capable of making an solid intermediate cable that's upgrade over the basic 4-conductor Grado cable, yet have a bit more flexibility than the 8-conductor cable, as well as creating a custom length that is not too long, or too short.

 

But, having the original items - good cable, etc. is almost essential if you want to resell the headphones.  Some people love customizations when done.  Others, not as much and tend to prefer stock (virgins) so they can then adjust and apply mods as needed from their perspective.

post #9795 of 27741
Quote:
Originally Posted by wje View Post
 

 

I've grown to realize that there are some people who don't like the 8-conductor Grado cable.  A few years back, I thought the cable was the end-all, be-all, but not as much lately.  I guess my feelings changed since I'm capable of making an solid intermediate cable that's upgrade over the basic 4-conductor Grado cable, yet have a bit more flexibility than the 8-conductor cable, as well as creating a custom length that is not too long, or too short.

 

But, having the original items - good cable, etc. is almost essential if you want to resell the headphones.  Some people love customizations when done.  Others, not as much and tend to prefer stock (virgins) so they can then adjust and apply mods as needed from their perspective.

Only problem with re-cabling is that the Grado drivers aren't really designed to be re-soldered too often and can be damaged by the inexperienced. 

 

The 8 is a better sounding cable than the 4 conductor, but it is too heavy, especially with the 325is.

I think they figure with the higher models with the big cable are designed for home use in a big comfy chair...

 

Interestingly Joe Grado has been modifying his HP1000 headphones to create what's being called the HP1i/HP2i.

One "improvement" is to double up his Signature cable - not unlike the difference between the Grado Labs 8 & 4 conductor cables.

 

I think both current cables serve there purpose unless one wants a different length or finds the 8 conductor too big. 

This is how I set up my old 60s: unbuttoned; L-Cush; vintage 325 leather headband; short Mogami w/ Rean 1/8 for portable; matching Mogami/Rean extention cable for home...


Edited by parbaked - 10/11/13 at 11:24am
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