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Grado Fan Club! - Page 369

post #5521 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post

 

 

haha, my bad...so Quebecois then? 

 

Oui mon ami!

post #5522 of 26150

Interesting. I thought John came on the scene much later. And are the 100, 200, and 300 as well regarded as the original 125, 225, and 325?

post #5523 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post

Interesting. I thought John came on the scene much later. And are the 100, 200, and 300 as well regarded as the original 125, 225, and 325?

If memory serves the -00 series use the HP drivers, but so many of them were cannibalized for spares or to make custom headphones. The original SR-125 and SR-225 were in production for ages (up until 2009), the 125 has always been odd-duck, the 225 is a fine headphone.
post #5524 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post

Interesting. I thought John came on the scene much later. And are the 100, 200, and 300 as well regarded as the original 125, 225, and 325?

If memory serves the -00 series use the HP drivers, but so many of them were cannibalized for spares or to make custom headphones. The original SR-125 and SR-225 were in production for ages (up until 2009), the 125 has always been odd-duck, the 225 is a fine headphone.


Okay, this is one that I never quite understand, is the HP-1/2/3 related to the HP-1000, it's not really addressed in that thread.

EDIT: From wikipedia: The Joseph Grado Signature Products HP-1000 series headphones were limited to 1000 units produced. The HP-1000 series consisted of the HP-1 (with phase/polarity switches), HP-2, and HP-3. They came in two varieties of cable. The Joseph Grado Signature Ultra-Wide Bandwidth Reference Cable and the Signature Laboratory Standard. Please note that the older, non "improved" models in Grado's lineup (such as SR-60 and RS1) are not contained within this table because the improvements were not significant and they directly replaced the older models in the lineup.


Edited by scootsit - 11/10/12 at 4:41pm
post #5525 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post

Nah, I'll refer you here:
http://www.head-fi.org/t/635644/15-pm-day-limit-for-long-standing-member-with-no-issues

 

Weird...

post #5526 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


If I were you, Focker, I'd look for a deck just like Stacker's. The Technics are excellent direct drive decks, that were made for DJs. The result is that they are damn near indestructible. They also sold like crazy, so they pop up on craigslist for ~$200-$400 often. If you can find one of the high end Regas, they're great, easily on par or better than a good Thorens or Lynn, they're all just different. The Technics was not designed to be an audiophile deck, but it has been widely adopted by audiophiles. I recently found the 1600 on craigslist for $75. If I had the time to run out there, and $75 to burn, it's a steal. The lower end of the 2M line is getting great feedback, too. The Red and Blue (I forget which, but one of those is ~$100) are supposed to be great. Another cart I hear great things about is the AT 440, I think, it's a very inexpensive high-output moving coil. I switched to HOMC a year or two ago, and love it. Also, the Denon 110 is awesome for the money, about $140. To be honest, Shure makes great stuff for the price. The lowest model Shure, the M92E, is pretty nice. It used to be easily found for ~$25. I put it on a Lenco (rebadged as a Bogen-Presto), which was popular with radio stations, and it sounded pretty great. Not quite on par with some of the others here, or even the venerable V15, but it's certainly no slouch, and isn't that far from their top of the line, M97

EDIT: In that ~$100 price range, the Sumiko Pearl sounds AMAZING!

 

Going vintage, if done right, can be a tremendous value. I've honestly not been so fond of the Pro-Ject decks I've seen/worked on, I'd take the Technics, or an older Lynn or Thorens any day. Not to say that they don't make good products, or aren't worth the money, I was just less impressed. I have seen some vintage decks that were pretty inexpensive which I found the be about on par with the newer Pro-Jects. I rebuilt a mid-80s Yamaha that was really nice. Also, the earlier Pioneer tables were great. There are tons of great decks out there, and if you find a great vintage one, you could get equivalent performance for a bit less.

 

From what i've read, it's the other way around, the original 1972 Technics SL-1200 was ment to be an audiophile deck, but beeing as indestructible as it was, DJs everywhere started using it, from then on it became known  as a DJ turntable.

 

The $100 Ortofon 2M Red is the cheaper of the 2M series.

 

Unless i'm mistaking, the AT-440 mla is a moving magnet, not a moving coil.

 

I bought my Technics SL-1200 MK2 brand new in the box three years ago for $635, and the built quality of this thing is just amazing, anyway, a few months ago i tought of selling it,and get a Rega RP3, when i got home and unboxed my new RP3 it felt very flimsy and not very confidence inspiring to say the least, but when i picked up my 1200 to make room for the RP3 , the difference in weight, and the feel of substance and quality was far from subtle.

 

For my first listen,i used one of my favorite vinyl,Fleetwood Mac live from Cleaveland, the song was 'I'm so affraid' wich starts with Mick Fleetwood pounding is drums as hard as he can, but through the RP3 it felt like a toy drum, no sence of weight behind the hits, and when Lindsay Buckingham started to do is magic with is guitar, the sound was thin and almost shrill, then the phone rang, it was someone who had just seen the add i'd put up to sell my 1200, i panicked and told him i had just sold it, i reinstalled my 2M Black on my 1200 and when back to the store the next day for a refund.

 

I know a lot of peoples have Regas RP3s and are very happy with it's sound signature, who knows, maybe it just didn't agree with the 2M Black, but one thing's for sure,  my 1200 isn't going anywhere soon.Still, as much as i like my 1200, i get as much satisfaction when i listen to a $1 LP on one of my beautyfull vintage Marantzs turntables.

post #5527 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


Okay, this is one that I never quite understand, is the HP-1/2/3 related to the HP-1000, it's not really addressed in that thread.

EDIT: From wikipedia: The Joseph Grado Signature Products HP-1000 series headphones were limited to 1000 units produced. The HP-1000 series consisted of the HP-1 (with phase/polarity switches), HP-2, and HP-3. They came in two varieties of cable. The Joseph Grado Signature Ultra-Wide Bandwidth Reference Cable and the Signature Laboratory Standard. Please note that the older, non "improved" models in Grado's lineup (such as SR-60 and RS1) are not contained within this table because the improvements were not significant and they directly replaced the older models in the lineup.

 

I'm not sure what your question is, but the HP1000 is composed of HP1/2/3 all three totalizing 1000, the most frequent is the HP2, followed by the HP1, (wich is also the most collectible one), and then the HP3 of wich less than 100 was made,mine are HP2s with the Joseph Grado signature cable.

post #5528 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


If I were you, Focker, I'd look for a deck just like Stacker's. The Technics are excellent direct drive decks, that were made for DJs. The result is that they are damn near indestructible. They also sold like crazy, so they pop up on craigslist for ~$200-$400 often. If you can find one of the high end Regas, they're great, easily on par or better than a good Thorens or Lynn, they're all just different. The Technics was not designed to be an audiophile deck, but it has been widely adopted by audiophiles. I recently found the 1600 on craigslist for $75. If I had the time to run out there, and $75 to burn, it's a steal. The lower end of the 2M line is getting great feedback, too. The Red and Blue (I forget which, but one of those is ~$100) are supposed to be great. Another cart I hear great things about is the AT 440, I think, it's a very inexpensive high-output moving coil. I switched to HOMC a year or two ago, and love it. Also, the Denon 110 is awesome for the money, about $140. To be honest, Shure makes great stuff for the price. The lowest model Shure, the M92E, is pretty nice. It used to be easily found for ~$25. I put it on a Lenco (rebadged as a Bogen-Presto), which was popular with radio stations, and it sounded pretty great. Not quite on par with some of the others here, or even the venerable V15, but it's certainly no slouch, and isn't that far from their top of the line, M97

EDIT: In that ~$100 price range, the Sumiko Pearl sounds AMAZING!

 

Going vintage, if done right, can be a tremendous value. I've honestly not been so fond of the Pro-Ject decks I've seen/worked on, I'd take the Technics, or an older Lynn or Thorens any day. Not to say that they don't make good products, or aren't worth the money, I was just less impressed. I have seen some vintage decks that were pretty inexpensive which I found the be about on par with the newer Pro-Jects. I rebuilt a mid-80s Yamaha that was really nice. Also, the earlier Pioneer tables were great. There are tons of great decks out there, and if you find a great vintage one, you could get equivalent performance for a bit less.

 

From what i've read, it's the other way around, the original 1972 Technics SL-1200 was ment to be an audiophile deck, but beeing as indestructible as it was, DJs everywhere started using it, from then on it became known  as a DJ turntable.

 

The $100 Ortofon 2M Red is the cheaper of the 2M series.

 

Unless i'm mistaking, the AT-440 mla is a moving magnet, not a moving coil.

 

I bought my Technics SL-1200 MK2 brand new in the box three years ago for $635, and the built quality of this thing is just amazing, anyway, a few months ago i tought of selling it,and get a Rega RP3, when i got home and unboxed my new RP3 it felt very flimsy and not very confidence inspiring to say the least, but when i picked up my 1200 to make room for the RP3 , the difference in weight, and the feel of substance and quality was far from subtle.

 

For my first listen,i used one of my favorite vinyl,Fleetwood Mac live from Cleaveland, the song was 'I'm so affraid' wich starts with Mick Fleetwood pounding is drums as hard as he can, but through the RP3 it felt like a toy drum, no sence of weight behind the hits, and when Lindsay Buckingham started to do is magic with is guitar, the sound was thin and almost shrill, then the phone rang, it was someone who had just seen the add i'd put up to sell my 1200, i panicked and told him i had just sold it, i reinstalled my 2M Black on my 1200 and when back to the store the next day for a refund.

 

I know a lot of peoples have Regas RP3s and are very happy with it's sound signature, who knows, maybe it just didn't agree with the 2M Black, but one thing's for sure,  my 1200 isn't going anywhere soon.Still, as much as i like my 1200, i get as much satisfaction when i listen to a $1 LP on one of my beautyfull vintage Marantzs turntables.


Thank you for correcting my errors. I think the 1200 was among the first that proved a direct drive could sound that smooth and good. I would never trade my TD-160 for anything newer.

 

I think of contemporary tables, the Regas are nice, I don't particularly care for their cartridges, though. I've heard their cartridges on other tables and been unimpressed. I've heard a Dynavector 10x5 (or whatever it is) on a Rega, and it sounded great. Rega arms can be tricky.

 

Really, lots of companies have made nice decks. I have always found nearly everything Yamaha made to be underrated (from the 70s and even early 80s). I built a system for a friend, early 70s Sansui amp, Marantz (sort of, it was one of their lower end subsidiaries) speakers, and a Yamaha deck. It was not their top of the line, and was from the early 80s. It had a really nice, solid plinth made of a thick piece of MDF. The arm on it was really impressive for the original MSRP, and the platter was surprisingly heavy and nice. I just made a few tweaks, threw a cart on it, and gave the whole rig to him.

 

Marantz tables are nice. The only table that has a great reputation that I am routinely disappointed by is Dual. I think Dual had a few great decks, and a lot of not-so-great ones, and I seem to always find the all plastic jobs.

 

I currently also have a Sansui amp with a TT built in the top, it was their attempt to target a lower end audience. The amp is all Sansui and weighs a ton, the TT is by someone else, I forget who. The whole thing is impressively built. I started working on it a few years back and the string from the tuner fell off, and it was a nightmare, it weaves in and around the TT, I never did get it back on. One day, I'll finish it, just got distracted. It will make an awesome little bedroom setup. It's quad, too. But, it has a stereo switch.


Edited by scootsit - 11/10/12 at 6:07pm
post #5529 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post

 

 

haha, my bad...so Quebecois then? 

You mean Canadien. smile.gif

post #5530 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


Thank you for correcting my errors. I think the 1200 was among the first that proved a direct drive could sound that smooth and good. I would never trade my TD-160 for anything newer.

 

I think of contemporary tables, the Regas are nice, I don't particularly care for their cartridges, though. I've heard their cartridges on other tables and been unimpressed. I've heard a Dynavector 10x5 (or whatever it is) on a Rega, and it sounded great. Rega arms can be tricky.

 

Really, lots of companies have made nice decks. I have always found nearly everything Yamaha made to be underrated (from the 70s and even early 80s). I built a system for a friend, early 70s Sansui amp, Marantz (sort of, it was one of their lower end subsidiaries) speakers, and a Yamaha deck. It was not their top of the line, and was from the early 80s. It had a really nice, solid plinth made of a thick piece of MDF. The arm on it was really impressive for the original MSRP, and the platter was surprisingly heavy and nice. I just made a few tweaks, threw a cart on it, and gave the whole rig to him.

 

Marantz tables are nice. The only table that has a great reputation that I am routinely disappointed by is Dual. I think Dual had a few great decks, and a lot of not-so-great ones, and I seem to always find the all plastic jobs.

 

I currently also have a Sansui amp with a TT built in the top, it was their attempt to target a lower end audience. The amp is all Sansui and weighs a ton, the TT is by someone else, I forget who. The whole thing is impressively built. I started working on it a few years back and the string from the tuner fell off, and it was a nightmare, it weaves in and around the TT, I never did get it back on. One day, I'll finish it, just got distracted. It will make an awesome little bedroom setup. It's quad, too. But, it has a stereo switch.

 

A lot of peoples who are into vintage gear, want to own the TOTL of their brand of choice,and there's nothing wrong with that, In my case, i'm just happy owning low to mid tier vintage gear, plus, of the three recievers and one integreated amp that i own, my favorite for sound quality is my Marantz 2220B wich happens to be the least powerfull with only 20 watts per channel, these things a plentyfull, and you can get a nice one for about $125.Also, what's nice about vintage gear, is there will never be an improved model coming out in a year or two that's going to make your gear out of date,or even obsolete.

 

I have had my 2220B for 5 years now, and i still think it's one of the best looking reciever ever built, beeing an entry level machine it has fewer buttons and knobs than the higher models, and makes for a cleaner,  less cluttered look.

 

When i think of all the nice gear i've aquired over the years, and how little it costed me, i feel i got my money's worth, and that's always a good feeling 

 

And last but not least, these old recievers often make for some nice headphone amps. 

 

Enough rambling for tonight.

post #5531 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


Thank you for correcting my errors. I think the 1200 was among the first that proved a direct drive could sound that smooth and good. I would never trade my TD-160 for anything newer.

 

I think of contemporary tables, the Regas are nice, I don't particularly care for their cartridges, though. I've heard their cartridges on other tables and been unimpressed. I've heard a Dynavector 10x5 (or whatever it is) on a Rega, and it sounded great. Rega arms can be tricky.

 

Really, lots of companies have made nice decks. I have always found nearly everything Yamaha made to be underrated (from the 70s and even early 80s). I built a system for a friend, early 70s Sansui amp, Marantz (sort of, it was one of their lower end subsidiaries) speakers, and a Yamaha deck. It was not their top of the line, and was from the early 80s. It had a really nice, solid plinth made of a thick piece of MDF. The arm on it was really impressive for the original MSRP, and the platter was surprisingly heavy and nice. I just made a few tweaks, threw a cart on it, and gave the whole rig to him.

 

Marantz tables are nice. The only table that has a great reputation that I am routinely disappointed by is Dual. I think Dual had a few great decks, and a lot of not-so-great ones, and I seem to always find the all plastic jobs.

 

I currently also have a Sansui amp with a TT built in the top, it was their attempt to target a lower end audience. The amp is all Sansui and weighs a ton, the TT is by someone else, I forget who. The whole thing is impressively built. I started working on it a few years back and the string from the tuner fell off, and it was a nightmare, it weaves in and around the TT, I never did get it back on. One day, I'll finish it, just got distracted. It will make an awesome little bedroom setup. It's quad, too. But, it has a stereo switch.

 

A lot of peoples who are into vintage gear, want to own the TOTL of their brand of choice,and there's nothing wrong with that, In my case, i'm just happy owning low to mid tier vintage gear, plus, of the three recievers and one integreated amp that i own, my favorite for sound quality is my Marantz 2220B wich happens to be the least powerfull with only 20 watts per channel, these things a plentyfull, and you can get a nice one for about $125.Also, what's nice about vintage gear, is there will never be an improved model coming out in a year or two that's going to make your gear out of date,or even obsolete.

 

I have had my 2220B for 5 years now, and i still think it's one of the best looking reciever ever built, beeing an entry level machine it has fewer buttons and knobs than the higher models, and makes for a cleaner,  less cluttered look.

 

When i think of all the nice gear i've aquired over the years, and how little it costed me, i feel i got my money's worth, and that's always a good feeling 

 

And last but not least, these old recievers often make for some nice headphone amps. 

 

Enough rambling for tonight.


Does the 2220B have the blue lights and the sideways slider tuner wheel? I LOVE the look of Marantz receivers! I've gone for Sansui stuff because it's cheap by comparison, but god, Marantz stuff is beautiful.

(Googled it, and it does have the blue lights and the Marantz style tuner wheel)

post #5532 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


Does the 2220B have the blue lights and the sideways slider tuner wheel? I LOVE the look of Marantz receivers! I've gone for Sansui stuff because it's cheap by comparison, but god, Marantz stuff is beautiful.

(Googled it, and it does have the blue lights and the Marantz style tuner wheel)

 

Actually my 2220B has more of a green hue,my newly aquired 2226B however has a gorgeous blue lighting and the Gyro tuner wheel. 

post #5533 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

 

I'm not sure what your question is, but the HP1000 is composed of HP1/2/3 all three totalizing 1000, the most frequent is the HP2, followed by the HP1, (wich is also the most collectible one), and then the HP3 of wich less than 100 was made,mine are HP2s with the Joseph Grado signature cable.

This is my understanding:

HP1/2/3 are the headphone models.

HP1000 is the driver used. The drivers were outsourced, from Asia (Japan or Singapore), if I remember correctly.

HP1 has polarity switches for studio use

HP2 has no polarity switch

HP3 used drivers that were not as well matched and therefore cost less.

The SR100/200/300 were launched as less expensive, consumer, versions and were designed around a new driver that Grado would eventually manufacturer in house.

Some of the early SR100/200/300 received the HP1000 drivers (as did some later SR325) instead of the new, Grado driver. No one knows why.

Most likely they used HP1000 drivers that were not up to standard for the HP1/2/3. I don't see Grado throwing those away :-)

 

SR125/22/5/325 launched in '93 are considered John's first 'phones, even though he was directly involved in making and/or designing the earlier headphones as well.

post #5534 of 26150
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


SHHHH. Remain ignorant - you'll get him to post more pictures of his BEAUTIFUL SR-325 for educational purposes. biggrin.gif:D:D
 

 

700

i need to score some flats for these as that's how they came originally - but they sound so good with bowls....


Edited by parbaked - 11/11/12 at 3:23am
post #5535 of 26150

There is a pair of what looks to me like the "rare" chrome 325is on ebay (not mine of course).

Personally, I am not a fan of the newer mushroom cups, which IMO are more heavy and not as pretty 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Grado-SR325is-Headphones-/230879995338?pt=US_Headphones&hash=item35c18525ca


Edited by parbaked - 11/11/12 at 3:45am
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