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Grado Fan Club! - Page 1408

post #21106 of 21113
Awesome stuff, stacker45. I grew up with those types of gears. Honed me into an upgradetitic!
post #21107 of 21113

Technics by Panasonic... SU-V98 amp and related components, 1980s:

 

post #21108 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamondears View Post

Awesome stuff, stacker45. I grew up with those types of gears. Honed me into an upgradetitic!

 

Thanks, what I love about vintage gear, is that not only can it sound very good, but it also looks good, and depending on what you buy, it can be inexpensive.

 

But wait!, there's more!, if you buy at the right price, you might, either, not lose much, if you decide to sell, you could break even, and get your money back. Or, you could even make money.

 

Case in point, a few years ago, I bought a Yamaha YP-B2 turntable for $40, a year later I sold it for $75, and upgrated to a YP-D6.

 

Another advantage is that vintage gear is immune against obsolence. If someone spends, say $1000 on a new home theater reciever, odds are it will be obsolete in the next year or two, and would be worth a small fraction of it's price new.

 

As far as I'm concern, when I buy a piece of gear that's 40 years old, I tend to have fairly low expectations, so, when I fire it up, if everithing lights up, works as it should, and sounds good too, I'm a VERY happy camper.

 

Now, I don't know about you but if I'd pay, three, five, ten, and sometimes more for an integrated amp, my expectations would be pretty high, so the potential for disapointment is much higher.

post #21109 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post

Thanks, what I love about vintage gear, is that not only can it sound very good, but it also looks good, and depending on what you buy, it can be inexpensive.

But wait!, there's more!, if you buy at the right price, you might, either, not lose much, if you decide to sell, you could break even, and get your money back. Or, you could even make money.

Case in point, a few years ago, I bought a Yamaha YP-B2 turntable for $40, a year later I sold it for $75, and upgrated to a YP-D6.

Another advantage is that vintage gear is immune against obsolence. If someone spends, say $1000 on a new home theater reciever, odds are it will be obsolete in the next year or two, and would be worth a small fraction of it's price new.

As far as I'm concern, when I buy a piece of gear that's 40 years old, I tend to have fairly low expectations, so, when I fire it up, if everithing lights up, works as it should, and sounds good too, I'm a VERY happy camper.

Now, I don't know about you but if I'd pay, three, five, ten, and sometimes more for an integrated amp, my expectations would be pretty high, so the potential for disapointment is much higher.

Interesting perspective. Prolly the point of diminishing returns were reached back in the 70s! Manufacturers are just finding ways to produce them at cheaper cost.
post #21110 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayandjohn View Post
 

Technics by Panasonic... SU-V98 amp and related components, 1980s:

 

 

This was my first sound system in 1990, nice soundind, and very reliable.

post #21111 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post
 

Yamaha model:???, my home-theater reviever is a 13 year old Yamaha RX-V 2200

I love Marantz, old,and new.

 

Oh, it's not vintage... a five year-old RX-V667. I love Marantz, as well, and your pics are incredible (especially the Pio R2R).  Well played, Sir!

post #21112 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krutsch View Post
 

 

Oh, it's not vintage... a five year-old RX-V667. I love Marantz, as well, and your pics are incredible (especially the Pio R2R).  Well played, Sir!

 

Thanks, and with new good quality tape, (Quantegy 456), the Pioneer sounds great, I never thought that I'd be doing critical listening with a tape recoreder one day, but, here I am!

post #21113 of 21113
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post
 

 

Thanks, and with new good quality tape, (Quantegy 456), the Pioneer sounds great, I never thought that I'd be doing critical listening with a tape recoreder one day, but, here I am!


My first exposure to Hi-FI was my step-father's Sony R2R in the mid 70s. I remember just standing there watching and listening to it and I was hooked for life.

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