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New Schiit Lyr: Hybrid 6W Headphone Amp. Yes. Six. Watts. RMS. - Page 7

post #91 of 833

I wrote it's ridiculous because the Sony's produce "dangerous SPL" at something as low as 10mW (as do most headphones) and I think that 3W would destroy them pretty quickly, and/or rip your eardrums.


Edited by xnor - 12/29/10 at 8:30am
post #92 of 833


Jason Stoddard,

 

Question on the amp. What kinds of connectors are on the rear? Is it just a single pair of RCA inputs? Is there a loop out or anything else back there?

Just didn't see any pictures on the site of the rear of the device and was curious. 

 

Thanks.

post #93 of 833

I want this Schiit.

post #94 of 833

Will there be a loaner program for this Schiit?

post #95 of 833

Hi,

like the other Schiit amps - they support both worlds 110 and 230 Volts and both 50 and 60 Hertz.

 

post #96 of 833

Your like flies round Schiit.etysmile.gif

post #97 of 833

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wharfrat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeGoodman View Post

Nice amp! I believe the LCD-2s can handle 15 watts, at which point they are blasting at 133 dbs...basshead.gif


I think your comment is instructive since it seems most of us want the kind of SPLs that allow the orthos and 'stats to really shine at the dynamic extremes   Since most products have spec sheets, what specs should one use to arrive at the conclusion that a given headphone can handle Y amounts of power to produce X amount of loudness?  Isn't there a formula out there we can draw from and pray our math ability is still intact since its pretty much conventional arithmetics...I recall some posts mentioning a bit of "this and that" calculation approach but they involved speaker loads and power amps as a frame of reference.

 

 

Okay Bob, I'll take a swing at this with my limited understanding. There doesn't seem to be any set formula for headphone/amplifier compatibility, and I think this is because there are just too many variables. I know that a given amplifier has to make choices on how it delegates it's wattage power, as in voltage or current, and there also has to be decisions made regarding how aggressive the amp's gain circuit is, as well as what level of impedance it will output nominally. On the headphone end, your low-ohm, high-sensitivity jobs like Grados are the easiest to drive, and higher impedance dynamics like Senn HD's are generally less sensitive and harder to drive. Both are affected by impedance matching with an amplifier, and I forget if it's low or high impedance dynamic headphones that like current rather than voltage, but there is an inverse relationship there.

 

Orthos (the newer high-end ones anyways) are low in impedance but require the most current, as opposed to voltage which gets applied directly to the drivers but is part of the sound signal. The HE-6 seems to be the most extreme example of that. Electrostatics need electricity separate from the sound signal that is then applied directly to the drivers; I haven't really looked into those yet myself because those amps are completely different.

 

I don't know very much at all about how different amplifier topologies (SE/balanced, triode, transformer coupled, push-pull, etc.) affect the above, but I feel like I am at least starting to understand headphone/amplifier compatibility in abstract yet practical terms. Of course there is also the whole solid state vs. tube debate, and the whole class A, B, or A/B thing which I believe has to do mainly with the signal path. If anyone with more knowledge cares to correct, clarify, or add to anything I have said I would welcome it, as I said I have just scratched the surface of the knowledge curve in this area. These conversations are always interesting to me, but they can get a bit contentious when discussing what it actually takes to drive a given headphone to it's full potential. I wish it was as easy as plugging specs into a master formula but from what I have gathered so far it is not.


Edited by grokit - 12/29/10 at 2:11pm
post #98 of 833
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

Some more answers. Sorry if they're not complete. 

 

 

First, bias current: 130mA quiescent, so most high-impedance headphones are going to be Class A, up to insane levels. Even orthos are only going to fall out on peaks, from our testing.

 

Second, yep, common cathode and current source, B+ at 200V. (Try that from a wall-wart!)

 

Third, Lyr does include preamp outs, as well as a single set of inputs. 

 

Hope this helps a bit. Not trying to be too obscure about the details of the amp, but I don't exactly want to hand over everything. Lyr was supposed to launch at the same time as our other amps, but it required quite a bit more development--many, many prototypes to sweat the details. 

post #99 of 833

Jason from what I have gathered you are like Bob Carver was in the 70's, rockin' the boat and haulin' in market share while battling China instead of Stereophile magazine.  Are you a physicist and an engineer like he is?

 

He's still at it making boutique amps (I think this recent one of his is $8k though, so he has changed his strategy to say the least):

 

BobCarver.jpg

 

Anyways what you are doing reminds me of what he did back in the day, so nice job smile.gif


Edited by grokit - 12/29/10 at 2:08pm
post #100 of 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by rushupedge View Post
This looks hot, can't wait for reviews.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by technocrat View Post
Seems like this might be the amp for my AH-d7000s. I was looking at the elekit tu-882 but I think I have to wait to see the reviews.


Not necessarily a response to the quoted posts, but if there's one rhetorical question I want to pose to this type of attitude, it's: what do you need a review for? A basic description of the amp has been provided along with the purpose of the amp (for high-impedance and/or inefficient headphones, including orthodynamics) and the company has a 15-day return policy. If you don't like it, return it or sell it on the FS forums. Just because the power output is spec'd at 6W into 32 Ohms doesn't mean it's necessarily for low-impedance headphones in general - any power output rating into 32 Ohms is a common spec on headphone amps. Jason Stoddard has already specifically stated this amp is for headphones like the Audeze LCD-2, HiFiMan HE-6/HE-5LE, and Beyerydynamic T1 - essentially, orthos and high-impedance headphones. By extrapolation this includes headphones like the other 600 Ohm Beyers (there are more than just the T1) and the AKG K340 & K240M, for example.


Edited by Asr - 12/29/10 at 2:03pm
post #101 of 833

@Jason,

 

Will this have a gain switch?

post #102 of 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post

First, bias current: 130mA quiescent, so most high-impedance headphones are going to be Class A, up to insane levels. Even orthos are only going to fall out on peaks, from our testing.

 

Second, yep, common cathode and current source, B+ at 200V. (Try that from a wall-wart!)

 

Third, Lyr does include preamp outs, as well as a single set of inputs. 

 

Nice!  This is a no-nonsense feature set that will serve all headphones well in Class A.  Only the most dynamic range source (read that as not your compressed modern day music and probably not vinyl) and insane volumes, coupled with insensitive headphones, will pop this into Class AB.

 

130mA into 32 ohms is going to pop out of class A around 541mW....that's insanely loud and for headphones like the D7000 and equates to over 135dB out of your D7000, so plenty of current reserve to drive even the HE-6 at normal listening levels (the HE-6 will fall out of class A around 113dB...845mW...and won't even reach the Vpp limit of the output devices, at which point you'd likely not notice as symphony peaks that high maybe once or twice a season in live performances).  I can see that gain may be an issue (which will test the pot quality on highly sensitive headphones), and noise floor (if audible), but that really shouldn't be a concern for most headphones.

post #103 of 833
Thread Starter 

Nope. No feedback = no gain switch. Well, not easily, anyway. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wuwhere View Post

@Jason,

 

Will this have a gain switch?

post #104 of 833

Jason, thanks.

post #105 of 833
Thread Starter 

Yeah, getting it quiet was a *big* deal. One reason we went for 6DJ8s. 6N1Ps are even quieter (one reason everyone comments on Valhalla being darn quiet) and Lyr has enough heater current to run those, as well.

 

The pot is audio taper, and we haven't had any real problem with Alps as far as tracking goes--even using Lyr on Grados. We'd have to go to insanely priced pots, and probably a bigger chassis, to do better than the RK27s, and stepped attenuators would be no bueno with the kind of gain we're running.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by holland View Post

 I can see that gain may be an issue (which will test the pot quality on highly sensitive headphones), and noise floor (if audible), but that really shouldn't be a concern for most headphones.
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