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How do you mod a Grado sr60i to have detail like a sr325is

post #1 of 106
Thread Starter 

Is it possible to get an sr80 or sr60 to sound like or have the detail level of a sr325?

 

I hear they are maybe the same driver? What would be the mod to accomplish this?     :D

post #2 of 106

Yes, the drivers are (physically) identical, however, showing wide quality spreads, they get sorted in respect of sound sig and overall quality. The treble friendly presentation of the SR325 has nothing to do with its housing either IMO. To summarize things, you can quite forget that approch.

 

But there are other mods possible to alter the sound sig to your personal liking:

SR60 mod

MS1000

post #3 of 106

 I don't see how you can say the drivers are identical between the SR325i's and the SR60i's.

 

Shine a flashlight into the backs of the cups.  They do not have the same appearance.  They look different.  They are different.

post #4 of 106

You can't see the driver by shining a light in the back of the cup - it's the driver you can see through the baffle.

post #5 of 106

 You can see the backs of the drivers through the backs of the cups.  They look different.

post #6 of 106

No you don't see the back of the driver - you see the back of the metal plate that holds the driver magnet and the wall between the driver and the air chamber.

 

Yes there are differences in that area from Grado to Grado - some have some of the vent holes open and others don't, some of the metal plates are damped by a tar like substance and others are not - but that does not change the fact that the drivers themselves all look exactly the same.

post #7 of 106

The voice coil and the cable of the sr325 is also of better quality.

post #8 of 106
Thread Starter 

So after a few general mods... You can change the cables, BUT you can't change the voice coils correct ?

Sry if it's a noob question...

post #9 of 106

If you want a 325 sound, buy one.  An SR-60/80 will NEVER sound like a 325.

post #10 of 106

 

Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

If you want a 325 sound, buy one.  An SR-60/80 will NEVER sound like a 325.


No, it will sound better.  Vent the driver.  Damp the back plate.  Replace all plastic with wood.  Replace the stock cable with silver.  Replace the comfies with either bowls or jumbos.  Do it right and you'll end up wondering why you ever set the 325 as some kind of standard.  Of course, reasonable minds may disagree about what might happen.  My opinion is based on something else.

post #11 of 106



And $500 later you'll have a phone that still doesn't sound like a $300 325.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

 

Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

If you want a 325 sound, buy one.  An SR-60/80 will NEVER sound like a 325.


No, it will sound better.  Vent the driver.  Damp the back plate.  Replace all plastic with wood.  Replace the stock cable with silver.  Replace the comfies with either bowls or jumbos.  Do it right and you'll end up wondering why you ever set the 325 as some kind of standard.  Of course, reasonable minds may disagree about what might happen.  My opinion is based on something else.

post #12 of 106

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post #13 of 106

 

Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

And $500 later you'll have a phone that still doesn't sound like a $300 325.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

 

Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

If you want a 325 sound, buy one.  An SR-60/80 will NEVER sound like a 325.


No, it will sound better.  Vent the driver.  Damp the back plate.  Replace all plastic with wood.  Replace the stock cable with silver.  Replace the comfies with either bowls or jumbos.  Do it right and you'll end up wondering why you ever set the 325 as some kind of standard.  Of course, reasonable minds may disagree about what might happen.  My opinion is based on something else.


 

 

$500? The silver will cost you $50, $60 with shipping.  Adhesive felt will cost you $5.  So will a connector from Radio Shack.  Assuming you own a steak knife to remove the grill cloth and a ballpoint pen to vent the drivers, and can take cups apart yourself, there should be no cost for these steps.  The cost of the wood will depend on your choice, but given the amount involved, the real variable is finding a way to get it cut.  The cost of the screen is also negligible, even if you have to buy a pair of scissors or wire cutters.

 

Given that your numbers are off by 80%, I can only assume that you have either never tried it or are God.  Drop me a line when you've either made an attempt - or parted the Red Sea - whichever happens first.  A blanket assertion is not an argument.


Edited by Bilavideo - 12/28/10 at 8:27am
post #14 of 106

BillaVideo sr60 Mod ---> problem solved!

 

btw have you heard the 325i's to understand what detail they give vs sr80i? From what ive read many people prefer the 225i....

post #15 of 106

This is a PM Bilavideo kindly sent to me, i'm sure he wont mind me posting it here for you to see: answers a lot of your questions:

 

Bilavideo wrote:

 

H, thanks for the private message.  There's nothing wrong with an iPod Nano and an SR80i, especially if your tracks are lossless.  I would say you are doing well.  Be careful of the many voices out there who will try to make money off with you with products you don't need.

 

Little Dot makes a variety of portable amplifiers.  The + in the MK1+ indicates that it's the newer version of the MK1.  There's a standard edition and a gold edition.  It's a difference in op-amps, the tiny little chips that are used to amplify the signal.  The standard edition uses the LME49720NA op-amp, which is a dual op-amp (one chip handles both signals).  The gold edition uses a separate chip, LME49710HA, for each track.  The MKII and MKIII are tube amplifiers, which are not portable.

 

If you want to change the tonal balance, to bring up the bass and control the highs, I wouldn't buy an inexpensive portable amp using op-amps.  These amps are good for giving power to high-impedance headphones (headphones that need an amp to fully power).  Grados have low-impedance, 32-ohm drivers.  They don't need an amp to power up.  You get plenty of volume right out of the Nano.  A cheap portable amp will give you volume you don't need, but it won't give you enough improvement in the bass to be worth the cost.  

 

You can spend more money on a tube amp but there are less expensive ways to get better bass and control Grado's highs.  I can show you how to do this work yourself.  For some people, I do the fixes myself.

 

Here are some basic improvements you can make to an SR80i that will cost you very little:

 

1. The easiest way to get more bass is to switch pads to flats ($35 plus shipping from TTVJ).  This will darken the sound and give you more dynamic bass.  Unfortunately, it will also narrow the soundstage. Having your ear so close to the driver will give you less a sense of space and will mute the treble.  For many, this is fine because they already feel they have too much treble.  I ended up modifying the flat pads, to widen the circle in the center to allow for more treble.  Still, I didn't like a smaller soundstage.

 

2. You can open up the cups and vent the driver back.  This costs nothing and dramatically improves bass.  The driver has 10 holes covered by felt.  This felt is supposed to be semi-permeable, allowing a certain amount of the backwave into the track to give these cans better bass.  I have found this felt to restrict the airflow, which is one reason Grados have issues with bass.  On the more expensive models, Grado vents four of these holes to allow "bass extension."  When I vent, I vent all ten holes.  It produces a dramatic increase in the bass.  This has a very nice effect on the tonal balance.  When you're not cranking up the volume to get more bass, you're not cranking up the treble.  More bass means less treble.  It's the best single difference you can make to a Grado - and it means you can save the $300 to $500 it would take to buy a decent amplifier to give the same bass you're getting with vented drivers.

 

3. Once you have the cups opened, you can also put something on the back of the magnet plate, to damp its ringing.  This will clear up the sound.  You will get better detail.

 

4. If you're more ambitious, you can remove the plastic grill and grill button, both of which are a source of resonance (extra waves and ricochets that get mixed into the sound).  This is another important way to clear up the sound.

 

MORE AMBITIOUS (AND EXPENSIVE) STEPS

 

5. Replace the plastic with wooden shells.  I bought equipment so I could do this, myself.  Wood has a much better sound than plastic.  From time to time, I make wooden shells for other headfiers.  

 

6. Replace the copper wire with silver wire.  I did this to an upgrade I made for a friend.  The silver wire conducts better than copper.  Wire, itself, doesn't have a sound - but getting a better connection really does improve the situation.  But instead of buying a commercial cable for hundreds of dollars, I simply bought four-braid 99.9% silver wire from a vendor and attached a gold-plated cable.  All in all, it cost me $60 but the sound improvement was out of this world.  After using silver, I would never go back to copper - not even Grado's fanciest copper cables.

 

If you want pictures, you can find them at the SR60i Mod thread I started. 

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