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Indestructible open headphones for snowboarding? - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Thread Starter 

Music is just a part of snowboarding I enjoy, and my iem's isolate to much..

 

 

 

earbuds are nice, but under a toque, they do isolate at most volumes.. also, they fall out a lot...

 

 

I was really looking for some big cans. Basically I'm thinking isolation shouldn't matter with them, because its over a toque?

post #17 of 32

Headphones and snowboarding

 

I'm kind of in the same boat. I was looking for some people talking about this. Plus, someone could probably write something like an academic paper on snowboarding with headphones/music. Warning! that is what follows..

 

For powder or light deep powdery snow, you just want to avoid anthing big or bulky because it will pick up the moisture but that is also the best time to have a really, really good headphone because of the experience of it. Sometimes, it is so relaxing that audiophile quality can actually come into play (believe it or not.)  So I'm undecided about that...

 

Icy east...you do literally need to hear. You need to hear, oh, say, the little kid in the big helmet that's behind you to let you know that you can't just make a b-line towards to woods on a whim to hit a terrain feature. This is for safety.

 

The KC-75s aren't great. They tend to flap and leave you worrying about them falling off. They are no good with a helmet, so scratch them. They are the worlds best bargain though. So, if you want to buy them, they are good to an extent and I've sent two of them back to Koss already after breaking them (lifetime warranty). Koss is really good that way. They actually sound good but you have to smoosh them against your ears to hear it. They are just open air and most of it escapes. I did take the clips off and string them through a simple Quicksilever audio beanie. The hat had it's own flat, open headphone drivers in there. I just replaced them with the KC 75s sans clips. That may be your cheap and "effective" solution if you can't go buds.

 

Another thing.. If you are worried about image. I would not recommend the big headphones, hanging out with your friends, while pretending to ignore them BECAUSE of your headphones. I would get something that is sleek, hardly noticeable and does the intended job. This way you can go faster, not look like a clown (no offense intended), and really enjoy yourself. Also, believe it or not, your friends will actaully think you are cooler!! if you choose headphones that allow you to excel at snowboarding without worrying about what part of you may fall off. There is a huge limit to what you can do without stuff that fits the situation. A few pipe riders wear some big phones, like Keir or D. Kass but they usually have a run dialed and they are not just learning. Trust me, I've been teaching it since I was 15. I'm now 31. I am the old guy that gets annoyed with snowboarders that dress a certain way or go at a certain slowness, but I'm not just an old guy, I was also on the team in college and I'm actually still learning and riding new stuff.

 

The isolation is pure bliss if you have the big headphones, but it's just really inconvenient. I take a few falls that could be "considered" bad all the time. It's just what happens. I still compete occasionally and like I said, I know every time I go I have to try something new.

 

Solution-wise, I'm also thinking about putting the Sennheiser MX-400 guts into the Altec Lansing UHP-307s. The Altec Lansings are called earclips-S. Got them for 10 bucks at TJ-MAXX because they reminded me of this headphone I tried a long time ago called Keoni Extreme Sports Headphones. Sounded like dogcrap and so do the altecs, but the holders and degree of "openness" are perfect for snowboarding, you'd have to try on a pair to see what I mean. Under helmet.. under beanie you name it, they are good and more open than earbuds but they alsodirect the sound directly into your ear unlike the KC-75s.

 

I may try Er6's or more expensive Ety's. But I've never tried high quality in ear headphones and I am still wrestling with the idea of going 35-40 mph on crowded icy eastern slopes without being able to hear things around you. I'm not made of cartilage anymore. Also, you can't just change your headphones to something better once you are up there because there is a nice park or mellow run. You usually have to freeride to get from one part of the mountain to the other. 

 

In conclusion..

 

If you want something that you can always use (helmet, hat, after a fall, rain or shine), find a pair of earbud-like that work for you and don't flair up your zits:

 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Altec-Lansing-UHP307-Silicone-Control/dp/B000Q7IACM (see the "customers also viewed" area)

 

If you feel you want something closed maybe go with Koss as they may not be indestructable but have lifetime warranties.

 

If you try closed:

 

Maybe Er-6...a large Koss Headphone....koss plugs.

 

 

I also have to say to any non-snowboarders trying to understand..Normal sized jumps for better snowboarders is 35-55 feet. 

300 dollar headphones could be gone in one weekend or with one crash. The guy in the video is wearing a pair of monitoring headphones. Sony MDR-700 DJ style. Something to consider. Those are obviously close to unbreakable. They may even be what you are looking for, but they didn't sound the best when I tried them at the store. And you are right, it isolates less when you put a furry hat between a closed headphone and your ear but probably not enough to be safe.

 

If anyone knows of the bigger budget headphones that would be a good idea given those conditions, throw me some more ideas as I am pretty much in the same boat.

 

Those Adidas seem awesome and I would love to hear a review on the sound quality of the closed ones with the bag.

 

Thanks,

 

Bobb-E


Edited by Bobb-E - 12/26/10 at 1:12pm
post #18 of 32

 

I'm kind of in the same boat. I was looking for some people talking about this. Plus, someone could probably write something like an academic paper on snowboarding with headphones/music. Warning! that is what follows..

 

For powder or light deep powdery snow, you just want to avoid anthing big or bulky because it will pick up the moisture but that is also the best time to have a really really good headphone because of the experience of it. Sometimes you are so relaxed that audiophile quality can actually come into play (believe it or not.)  So I'm undecided about that...

 

Icy east...you do literally need to hear. You need to hear, oh, say, the little kid in the big helmet that's behind you to let you know that you can't just make a b-line towards to woods on a whim to hit a terrain feature. This is for safety.

 

The KC-75s aren't great. They tend to flap and leave you worrying about them falling off. They are no good with a helmet, so scratch them. They are the worlds best bargain though. So, if you want to buy them, they are good to an extent and I've sent two of them back to Koss already after breaking them (lifetime warranty). Koss is really good that way. They actually sound good but you have to smoosh them against your ears to hear it. They are just open air and most of it escapes. I did take the clips off and string them through a simple Quicksilever audio beanie. The hat had it's own flat, open headphone drivers in there. I just replaced them with the KC 75s sans clips. That may be your cheap and "effective" solution if you can't go buds.

 

Another thing.. If you are worried about image. I would not recommend the big headphones, hanging out with your friends, while pretending to ignore them BECAUSE of your headphones. I would get something that is sleek, hardly noticeable and does the intended job. This way you can go faster, not look like a clown (no offense intended), and really enjoy yourself. Also, believe it or not, your friends will actaully think you are cooler!! if you choose headphones that allow you to excel at snowboarding without worrying about what part of you may fall off. There is a huge limit to what you can do without stuff that fits the situation. A few pipe riders wear some big phones, like Keir or D. Kass but they usually have a run dialed and they are not just learning. Trust me, I've been teaching it since I was 15. I'm now 31. I am the old guy that gets annoyed with snowboarders that dress a certain way or go at a certain slowness, but I'm not just an old guy, I was also on the team in college and I'm actually still learning and riding new stuff.

 

The isolation is pure bliss if you have the big headphones, but it's just really inconvenient. I take a few falls that could be "considered" bad all the time. It's just what happens. I still compete occasionally and like I said, I know every time I go I have to try something new.

 

Solution-wise, I'm also thinking about putting the Sennheiser MX-400 guts into the Altec Lansing UHP-307s. The Altec Lansings are called earclips-S. Got them for 10 bucks at TJ-MAXX because they reminded me of this headphone I tried a long time ago called Keoni Extreme Sports Headphones. Sounded like dogcrap and so do the altecs, but the holders and degree of "openness" are perfect for snowboarding, you'd have to try on a pair to see what I mean. Under helmet.. under beanie you name it, they are good and more open than earbuds but they alsodirect the sound directly into your ear unlike the KC-75s.

 

I may try Er6's or more expensive Ety's. But I've never tried high quality in ear headphones and I am still wrestling with the idea of going 35-40 mph on crowded icy eastern slopes without being able to hear things around you. I'm not made of cartilage anymore. Also, you can't just change your headphones to something better once you are up there because there is a nice park or mellow run. You usually have to freeride to get from one part of the mountain to the other. 

 

In conclusion..

 

If you want something that you can always use (helmet, hat, after a fall, rain or shine), find a pair of earbud-like that work for you and don't flair up your zits:

 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Altec-Lansing-UHP307-Silicone-Control/dp/B000Q7IACM (see the "customers also viewed" area)

 

If you feel you want something closed maybe go with Koss as they may not be indestructable but have lifetime warranties.

 

If you try closed:

 

Maybe Er-6...a large Koss Headphone....koss plugs. Sony eggo's used to fit the bill that you are talking about about but they are mondo difficult to find.

 

I also have to say to any non-snowboarders trying to understand..Normal sized jumps for better snowboarders is 35-55 feet. 

300 dollar headphones could be gone in one weekend or with one crash. The guy in the video is wearing a pair of monitoring headphones. Sony MDR-700 DJ style. Something to consider. Those are obviously close to unbreakable. They may even be what you are looking for, but they didn't sound the best when I tried them at the store. And you are right, it isolates less when you put a furry hat between a closed headphone and your ear. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdflEGKv-cI

 

If anyone knows of the bigger budget headphones that would be a good idea given those conditions, throw me some more ideas as I am pretty much in the same boat.

 

Those Adidas seem awesome and I would love to hear a review on the sound quality of the closed ones with the bag.

 

Thanks,

 

Bobb-E

post #19 of 32

You wont get nothing like what you want for under $40!

post #20 of 32
Thread Starter 

Bobb- E

 

I love the...inspiration? that I gave you in this thread to type up so much of a storm.. Seriously, you are helping a lot, thanks. You made a lot of valid points and here's what I have to say:

 

I live in the middle of Canada. Despite what you may think, this is prairies. All the land is flat. You can see miles and miles because there isn't the slightest hill in the way.

 

In Winnipeg, there is a massive amount of flooding that happens because of the weather being so crap, and a floodway had to be developed to divert the water from the rivers that go through the city, outside where the water can flow and not destroy homes. It is essentially a gigantic ditch, that is dug around an entire city. This is where Spring Hill is located. a run consists of MAYBE 2 rails, if you're decent enough to carve fast enough. There is no concern of 35-50 ft jumps, or anything remotely close. Rails are at max 20ft and the jumps are maybe 20ft? (there is only 2) Also, the whole thing is hardpack ice. I never once have had my fall broken by powder. Water getting in is NOT an issue.

 

I have fallen pretty goddamn hard on this hill, and I definitely believe that as long as a headphone isn't a piece of crap, that it should be able to withstand the fall..

 

I'm honestly leaning towards Coby CV-185, or maybe Panasonic RP-DJ120..

 

By the way, I don't wear a helmet.

post #21 of 32

^ Well, the portapros are pretty close ;)

You might also check out the igrado headphones.

post #22 of 32

I was in the same boat as you.

After all said and done I picked up some Sony MDR V150's. I find they work well enough so I can enjoy my tunes, they are cheap if I should break them and if someones is talking to me I can move a cup off my ear.

They are also easy to drive so there are no worries about draining your source if your on the mountain the whole day.

 

Oh, and they are all black and look fine.

post #23 of 32
Thread Starter 

That's exactly what I was thinking Millie2727

 

Thanks, perfect. I'll get them ASAP. Know of any local Canadian businesses that sell them?

post #24 of 32

Wal-mart

post #25 of 32

I wear a balaclava and look a lot like a soldier on the slopes, so the KSC75 style fits fine on me.

post #26 of 32

Snowboarding time is almost upon us again! 

 

I've tried IEMs, but didn't like that they isolated too much. On crowded runs, I couldn't hear people around me as much as I'd liked. 

 

I had the Skullcandy Double Agent, that got tons of use. The sound quality sucked, but the mp3 player was inside the headphone so I didn't have to connect it to an external DAP. 

 

In the end, I much prefer carrying a little speaker like this: 

 

153_tq383alt_1208110821.jpg

 

I gets loud enough for me to hear, as well as my friends that are riding close-by. The only thing is making sure your playlist doesn't contain any explicit lyrics or else the father of the 8 year old girl on the lift next to you will shoot you very mean glances. 

post #27 of 32

I wear the sony Giiq headphones.

They're virtually undestructable (made for skateboarding, so wont break under high impact), stylish, good sound quality, comfortable, and dont isolate outside noise. (unless played at high volumes).  earlier today, my friend got mad and threw them to a wall, and they were perfectly fine (other then me getting pissed off at my friend).  They only cost about 60$, but you can get them for cheeper on sale.  They sometimes have 2 for one sony headphone sales, so you can buy 2 and sell the second one or give it away.

post #28 of 32

Riding with music is awesome! However if you're just starting out and still falling a lot I wouldn't recommend it. There's a certain amount of situational awareness you need on the hill. 

 

When I ride I don't listen for clarity or soundstage or audio quality... I just need music to entertain me... my guess is you're looking for the same. The Sony MDR-V150 is a good suggestion.. it's cheap. Any cheap headphone will work for your purposes including those Skullcandys if you can get them cheap enough. 

 

Cheaper the better... so if you do crash and a someone rides over your headphone cable.. cutting them (happened to me twice)... you won't be super pissed. 

 

Closed back or open doesn't really matter that much... since you're riding with a toque/beanie... you can just place them forward/back a little and you'll be able to hear stuff around you. Some of my friends ride with their goggle straps on top of the headphones to keep them planted to their head... I don't because I find my ears hurt after like 10 minutes.

 

The past 3 seasons.. I've been riding with a helmet with built-ins... sound quality is poop... but I get to listen to my music. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #29 of 32

Forget earbuds for snowboarding: they're tangly, uncomfortable, and the wires get in the way.

 

The best solution I have found are ZED-phones. Flat Bluetooth Speakers stitched into really good headbands and beanies. We got ours from www.ZED-phones.com but I think they're in stores too. They deliver globally for free anyway.

 

Sounds quality was good. They play a whole day straight without a charge. Standby for days and have a wireless distance of about 10 metres. Made by boarders for boarders they are the only decent options I've seen on any mountain.

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mondor88 View Post

Forget earbuds for snowboarding: they're tangly, uncomfortable, and the wires get in the way.

 

The best solution I have found are ZED-phones. Flat Bluetooth Speakers stitched into really good headbands and beanies. We got ours from www.ZED-phones.com but I think they're in stores too. They deliver globally for free anyway.

 

Sounds quality was good. They play a whole day straight without a charge. Standby for days and have a wireless distance of about 10 metres. Made by boarders for boarders they are the only decent options I've seen on any mountain.

You could always try the Arriva Leo Bluetooth headphones.  They would be great under a n helmet. 

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