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Amps that can drive the HiFiMan HE-6 planar headphones - Page 120

post #1786 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardilla View Post

http://www.headfonia.com/burson-vs-violectric-conductor-vs-v200v800/ (check the comments)

Mike at headfonia calims the V200 with the V800 is the best he've heard with the HE-6. 

Strangely, he sells more expensive and powerful amps in his shop, so you cannot blame him on being totally biased.. I heard the V200 HE-6 myself and quite liked it, actually - but all this talk about wattage gets to you, haha

Any comments? From people who actually HEARD the V200 (fed balanced) in direct comparison to other HE-6 capable amps?
I had the v200 with the he-6, but single ended. It was quite pleasant, but not really in the same league with what you hear with a good speaker amplifier. You can get a more impactful presentation and much better soundstage. I have used relatively low powered amp - have a 2a3 push pull which is 12 watts into 8 ohms - and a much more powerful hybrid that is 150 watts. Both just way better than the v200, but they also cost much much more. I had the amps already so it was sort of a no brainier to switch over after starting with the v200. But if you can afford a decent speaker amp these headphones really do shine
post #1787 of 3103

First post here.

For people who have heard the alesis ra150 and emotiva mini-x a-100 with the he6.

Which do you think works better with the he 6? What are some differences? Is there any others in similar price range that are better?

post #1788 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarsHP View Post
 

Continuous rated power output will be the minimum undistorted output power in a specified load. Peaks higher than this are rarely specified and when they are, duration is also important. However, we often (if not always) see amps capable of playing louder in peaks than continuous power. I put that aside anyway:

 

At 90dB the HE-6 needs just short of 0.02W (20 mW). This means that to reach 100dB 0.2W is needed and to reach 110dB 2W is needed. So - if you have music with peaks 20dB higher than the average SPL (which would be quite extreme) and your average SPL is 90dB's, then you need an amp capable of delivering 2W in the appropriate load. I can say from my own experience with my SPL meter at hand, that 90dB average is very loud - much too loud for me (through speaker or headphone). This means that 2W is (more than) enough for me to get the desired SPL without clipping.

 

When all this is said, much of the debate in this thread about properly driving HE-6 is related to bass and treble performance: a lean or anemic bass and a harsh or sharp treble is associated with under-powering HE-6. This is much more interesting to me than clipping, because clipping is more easily detected than a tonal imbalance caused by under-powering: people will think HE-6 is bass shy for instance even though it is not. It is simply underpowered. That's the notion you get reading many posts here and in the HE-6 thread. I have been one of those in this "choir" saying you need at least 5 or 6 Watts, but my experience has proven this wrong. I don't find the bass thin and/or the treble harsh when powering HE-6 with the built-in balanced amp in respectively HM-801 and HM-901. They just have a limit in terms of SPL. No distortion, no tonal imbalance, no lean bass or sharp treble - just a limit in terms of maximum SPL. 

 

Please explain how an amplifier does not deliver the required power to a headphone, but does not go into clipping.  I'm not trying to be snippy, I'd really like to know.  From my small amount of formal education in electronics I can't wrap my head around the concept. What am I missing?

 I know that some amplifiers exhibit what is referred to as "soft clipping".  Particularly, tube amps, but also some solid state designs.  Not sure how that is implemented in solid state.  Is that the way the "underpowered amplifier" SOUNDS like its not clipping?  Or is there some other phenomenon I'm not considering?

post #1789 of 3103
It could come about if the amplifier doesn't have enough gain. If the gain is too low to deliver sufficient output levels, but the out put stage is capable of delivering all the voltage and current if it did, you'd have a situation where the amp doesn't have enough power to drive the load but at the same time, the amp isn't driven into clipping.

se
post #1790 of 3103

That can also happen if the source does not have enough voltage output so the amp does not go into clipping.

post #1791 of 3103

Mr. Eddy and wuwhere:  Thank you.  Yes, I had considered that after I posted.  Is that actually what is going on in some/most/all (?) of these amplifiers that are reported as under powered?

 

Lets say, for the sake of argument that a particular amplifier has sufficient gain for the source its being fed, but otherwise falls short of being able to deliver the full voltage or current to the load.  Any other phenomena that can account for this "not enough power but still sounds OK" thing?

post #1792 of 3103

"Most" systems usually have too much gain, but as always, there are exceptions.

post #1793 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by potterma View Post
 

Please explain how an amplifier does not deliver the required power to a headphone, but does not go into clipping.  I'm not trying to be snippy, I'd really like to know.  From my small amount of formal education in electronics I can't wrap my head around the concept. What am I missing?

 I know that some amplifiers exhibit what is referred to as "soft clipping".  Particularly, tube amps, but also some solid state designs.  Not sure how that is implemented in solid state.  Is that the way the "underpowered amplifier" SOUNDS like its not clipping?  Or is there some other phenomenon I'm not considering?

Steve Eddy is to the point (of course) in the case of HM-801 and 901 and other amps: The amp section is built with gain in such a way that clipping won't happen no matter how much you turn up the volume (unless it is the headphone itself distorting because it is overdriven - for instance a sensitive IEM recieving much more power than it is capable of handling undistorted). This has a drawback in the situation where you have a very low level recording: You won't get the volume you otherwise could have if the amp had more gain.

post #1794 of 3103

Just gonna JUMP right in here,

 

how well does the Audio GD 10ES2 do at drving the HE 6? the orignal ES got a YES but does it sound good?   Other than "too bright" which for me does not exist as I have yet to own a can I found TO bright, heck I found the K550 treble to be dull q.q

 

Anyways, how are the mids and Bass of the HE 6 out of an Audio GD 10ES2? 

post #1795 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post
 

Just gonna JUMP right in here,

 

how well does the Audio GD 10ES2 do at drving the HE 6? the orignal ES got a YES but does it sound good?   Other than "too bright" which for me does not exist as I have yet to own a can I found TO bright, heck I found the K550 treble to be dull q.q

 

Anyways, how are the mids and Bass of the HE 6 out of an Audio GD 10ES2? 

 

Seconded, though not for the purposes of the HE-6  (LCD-3 and HD700)

post #1796 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarsHP View Post
 

Steve Eddy is to the point (of course) in the case of HM-801 and 901 and other amps: The amp section is built with gain in such a way that clipping won't happen no matter how much you turn up the volume (unless it is the headphone itself distorting because it is overdriven - for instance a sensitive IEM recieving much more power than it is capable of handling undistorted). This has a drawback in the situation where you have a very low level recording: You won't get the volume you otherwise could have if the amp had more gain.

 

Huh!  Never would have guessed!  So, to make sure I understand you, the gain is so low on the HM-801 and 901 so as to never sufficiently drive the HE-6?  

 
Well, thanks for clearing that up... Learn something new every day!
post #1797 of 3103
Does anyone have experience driving the nfb 28 with he6?
post #1798 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by shackleford View Post

Does anyone have experience driving the nfb 28 with he6?

 

I had the NFB-10SE w/ the HE-6..... I don't think I would recommend it if you are running it exclusively for the HE-6.
post #1799 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwappo99 View Post
 

 

I had the NFB-10SE w/ the HE-6..... I don't think I would recommend it if you are running it exclusively for the HE-6.

It looks like the nfb 28 gives some more output power to 50 ohms than the 10se.

post #1800 of 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by shackleford View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwappo99 View Post
 

 

I had the NFB-10SE w/ the HE-6..... I don't think I would recommend it if you are running it exclusively for the HE-6.

It looks like the nfb 28 gives some more output power to 50 ohms than the 10se.

 

It's spec'd to be slightly more powerful than the NFB-10SE. I don't think it's quite enough power for the HE-6
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