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++ FULL-SIZE HEADPHONE RECOMMENDATIONS THREAD++ CLOSED: Please post a thread in the Introductions, Help and Advice forum - Page 1039  

post #15571 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTB View Post
Hey all, so I've taken your advice on buying an add-on mic.. but i do still have a few questions:

Why is it that they manufacture gaming headphones - and not just manufacture, but dedicate entire companies to, like turtle beach - when you can always just buy a mic? I mean is there really any difference between a gaming headset and a headset with a mic added on? Are you really just paying a premium for the convenience of a mic..or? 

Also, I've noticed that, unfortunately gaming headphones are among the best-looking headphones for most 17 year-olds. Yes a pair of Senn's will have vastly superior sound quality, but are there any good audiophile headphones that are sleek and hip? 

Either way, i've been looking at reviews for audiophile headphones, and I found some on Sennheiser, so i looked on their site. A question of mine is: Is Sennheiser the type of company that labels the quality of its products with a number? (IE, the X 550 is better than the X 450) Because I've noticed a price jump that goes along with a higher number - is this because of the level of quality, or simply because of how newly released it is?

So here are my finds, in order of what I personally think looks the most promising:

HD 558    http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/1376/14

HD 449    http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/2876/43

HD 439    http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/2875/43

And one that I'm also curious about how it compares is the HD 380 pro http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/1241/13

If anyone has had any experience with any of those, I would love to hear their thoughts

Now, one last thing that I am considering is the infamous V Moda Crossfade LP  http://v-moda.com/crossfade-lp/

A lot of people apparently have been hating on these, as though they are the new Beats, however, this article gives me hope: http://www.head-fi.org/t/613371/vmoda-crossfade-lp-why-all-the-bad-reviews

I'm so swamped with all the choices out there, i would love some help narrowing them down. Thank you in advance to anyone who tries to help :)

Sennheiser HD558 gets my vote.

post #15572 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post

Sennheiser HD558 gets my vote.


 Yes--well regarded for music and gaming; easy to drive when compared to most in its class.

post #15573 of 29490

Any reason that both of you go for the 558? Purple can you explain why you vote for it? And KG, what do you mean by "easy to drive"?

post #15574 of 29490


Quote:

Originally Posted by TyTB View Post

Why is it that they manufacture gaming headphones - and not just manufacture, but dedicate entire companies to, like turtle beach - when you can always just buy a mic? I mean is there really any difference between a gaming headset and a headset with a mic added on? Are you really just paying a premium for the convenience of a mic..or? 

 

I think part of this comes down to people not being aware of the audiophile niche and brands like turtle beach being pushed pretty hard among gamers.

 

The other thing I would put it down to is they have the '<insert console here> compatible' sticker on the boxes so they are a safe bet for console gamers and are often on display at their local game retailers (and are recommended by their in-store staff).

 

Quote:
Also, I've noticed that, unfortunately gaming headphones are among the best-looking headphones for most 17 year-olds. Yes a pair of Senn's will have vastly superior sound quality, but are there any good audiophile headphones that are sleek and hip? 

I personally don't like the look of the turtle beach headsets, all very chunky and plastic.

 

What about the sennheiser 25s?

http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/1374/13

http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/643/13

 

At the end of the day sound and looks are very subjective, if you are able to then you should go and find some headphones you like the look of and that sound good to you by listening to them.

 

 

Quote:

So here are my finds, in order of what I personally think looks the most promising:

 

HD 558    http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/1376/14

The 558 (and from memory all the 5xx and 6xx series) are open and so are not really suited for portable use unless you want to hear everyone and for everyone to be able to hear your music.

post #15575 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTB View Post

Any reason that both of you go for the 558? Purple can you explain why you vote for it? And KG, what do you mean by "easy to drive"?

The sennheiser 5xx series are quite popular around here.

Easy to drive means they are low impedance so you can drive (run them nicely) from almost any device (ipod, pc sound card, etc.).

post #15576 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by regicide View Post

The 558 (and from memory all the 5xx and 6xx series) are open and so are not really suited for portable use unless you want to hear everyone and for everyone to be able to hear your music.

It's interesting that you say that. Im wondering, I have a pair of Solo HD Beats by Dre, and when i put them on (they're on-ear) i find that the entire world has disappeared, even though they have no noise cancellation. As long as these would be as good as that, im more than happy.

 

One thing though, closed-backed headphones, while they are more quiet, is it by an extreme amount? Like can you hear everything pouring out of open-backed cans, or only at high volumes? Because im worried that if i go for closed-backed cans they will heat up faster and be a bit more uncomfortable, seeing as how they cant breath as much.

 

And thank you Regicide for clearing that up.


Edited by TyTB - 6/18/12 at 6:02pm
post #15577 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTB View Post

It's interesting that you say that. Im wondering, I have a pair of Solo HD Beats by Dre, and when i put them on (they're on-ear) i find that the entire world has disappeared, even though they have no noise cancellation. As long as these would be as good as that, im more than happy.

 

One thing though, closed-backed headphones, while they are more quiet, is it by an extreme amount? Like can you hear everything pouring out of open-backed cans, or only at high volumes? Because im worried that if i go for closed-backed cans they will heat up faster and be a bit more uncomfortable, seeing as how they cant breath as much.

Noise cancellation is a little different.

Noise cancelling means that they have an electronic circuit to remove noise, this is usually achieved by recording the sound outside the headphones and then 'subtracting' it from the sound output by the speaker, the effect is that your brain cancels out any outside noise (this is an oversimplified explanation).

 

Noise isolation on the other hand is what we are talking about, noise isolation refers to being isolated or separated from the noise. Think of holding two pillows over your ears.

 

Closed back (noise isolating) means that you have a piece of plastic (or metal, or wood, or ...) between the speakers and the outside world.

Open back means this piece is either removed entirely or has a bunch of holes punched into it so sound can generally travel both ways.

 

The beats are closed backs.

Fully open back cans (like grados) leak a lot of sound to the outside world (as well as let a lot of sound in).


Edited by regicide - 6/18/12 at 6:12pm
post #15578 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTB View Post

Any reason that both of you go for the 558? Purple can you explain why you vote for it? And KG, what do you mean by "easy to drive"?

 

It is a balanced smooth headphone with a very good sound stage.  It is extremely comfortable.

 

Rated at 50 Ohms and a sensitivity of 102 db, it takes just modest amplification to drive it well.

post #15579 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by regicide View Post

Noise cancellation is entirely different.

Noise cancelling means that they have an electronic circuit to remove noise, this is usually achieved by recording the sound outside the headphones and then 'subtracting' it from the sound output by the speaker, the effect is that your brain cancels out any outside noise (this is an oversimplified explanation).

 

Noise isolation on the other hand is what we are talking about, noise isolation refers to being isolated or separated from the noise. Think of holding two pillows over your ears.

 

Closed back (noise isolating) means that you have a piece of plastic (or metal, or wood, or ...) between the speakers and the outside world.

Open back means this piece is either removed entirely or has a bunch of holes punched into it so sound can generally travel both ways.

 

The beats are closed backs.

Fully open back cans (like grados) leak a lot of sound to the outside world (as well as let a lot of sound in).

 

Yes, I am aware of the science behind noise cancellation, and you're right, I was referring to Isolation. This is unfortunate though, because the 558's looked like a great pair of headphones.

 

So then, when it comes to closed headphones, how do my other finds compare? For ease of comparison, saying that the 558's were a 10, what would the 449's and 439's be? And the 380's? Or does anyone else have a suggestion for a different company and headphone altogether?

 

http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/2876/43

http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/2875/43

http://www.sennheiser.ca/live/senn/produit/en/1241/13

http://v-moda.com/crossfade-lp/

post #15580 of 29490

Hi there,

I'm pretty new to the whole audiophile scene and really don't know much about good quality headphones, amps, etc. I have been wanting to upgrade from my Apple iPhone earphones for a while now, and after reading a lot of reviews and opinions, I've settled on the Audio-Technica ATH-M50 - from what I've read it seems like a great bang for my buck and should, hopefully, be a great introduction into higher quality headphones. I am going to use these headphones pretty much entirely with my iPhone 4 and laptop (MacBook Pro), and I was wondering if I needed any sort of portable headphone amp to accompany this pair? I have read varying opinions about this - some say that it isn't necessary, others say it will benefit one's listening experience, etc. Since I don't really know anything about amps and if they are necessary, I was wondering if someone here could help me out a bit on the matter.

Thank you.

post #15581 of 29490

Most headphones that sound fine without an amp sound better with an amp.

From memory many use the m50s driven out of a portable device so you should be fine.

You could always invest in a cheap portable amp like the fiio e11 further down the track if you feel like it.

post #15582 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlassTable View Post

Hi there,

I'm pretty new to the whole audiophile scene and really don't know much about good quality headphones, amps, etc. I have been wanting to upgrade from my Apple iPhone earphones for a while now, and after reading a lot of reviews and opinions, I've settled on the Audio-Technica ATH-M50 - from what I've read it seems like a great bang for my buck and should, hopefully, be a great introduction into higher quality headphones. I am going to use these headphones pretty much entirely with my iPhone 4 and laptop (MacBook Pro), and I was wondering if I needed any sort of portable headphone amp to accompany this pair? I have read varying opinions about this - some say that it isn't necessary, others say it will benefit one's listening experience, etc. Since I don't really know anything about amps and if they are necessary, I was wondering if someone here could help me out a bit on the matter.

Thank you.

 

Some headphones work fine out of lower powered portable devices (e.g. Grados & most Sonys) and some don't.  You can sure tell if they are not loud enough, but you might not know that, even though they are loud, that they have lost virtually all of their bass (e.g. Ultrsasone Pro 750) without amping.  You probably need do do some searching on this site and Googling others to educate yourself on the subject.

 

Meanwhile a safe and conservative rule of thumb determined by an engineer and headphone lover is:  "Generally, 16 – 32 ohm headphones with a sensitivity rating of at least 100 dB/mW do not need an amplifier."

 

Also check the buying guides that are linked in the opening post of this thread and look for cans rated "1".


Edited by KG Jag - 6/18/12 at 9:49pm
post #15583 of 29490

So, I received a pair of brand new ATH-M50 in the mail. After a good few hours of listening, I've come to find that, overall, I don't like them. I do like the bass of them though. Also, know that I like the trebles and the mids of my HD555, but it's a bit bass shy. I love my M5's, but I tend to find that the sub-bass is a bit too much. Otherwise it's an amazing IEM.

 

My budget will be around $300 USD. This will pretty flexible though since I may be saving a bit more.

 

I will be buying an amp and dac according to the headphone I choose. I've been contemplating about the Schiit Asgard and Bifrost.

 

The bitrate of my library varies from 156kbps (being the minority), 320kbps (only a few more than the previous), and FLAC (80% of my library.)

 

I listen to a bit of everything, but my library most consists of electronic music now-a-days.

 

This will be a 100% home set-up. I don't mind if the headphone is open or closed, as long as it has the right sound.

 

I've been thinking about picking up a pair of Sennheiser HD650's or possibly waiting on a higher end headphone to fall within reach on the BST.

 

I just need thought from someone a bit more experienced than myself.

post #15584 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ora M View Post

So, I received a pair of brand new ATH-M50 in the mail. After a good few hours of listening, I've come to find that, overall, I don't like them. I do like the bass of them though. Also, know that I like the trebles and the mids of my HD555, but it's a bit bass shy. I love my M5's, but I tend to find that the sub-bass is a bit too much. Otherwise it's an amazing IEM.

 

My budget will be around $300 USD. This will pretty flexible though since I may be saving a bit more.

 

I will be buying an amp and dac according to the headphone I choose. I've been contemplating about the Schiit Asgard and Bifrost.

 

The bitrate of my library varies from 156kbps (being the minority), 320kbps (only a few more than the previous), and FLAC (80% of my library.)

 

I listen to a bit of everything, but my library most consists of electronic music now-a-days.

 

This will be a 100% home set-up. I don't mind if the headphone is open or closed, as long as it has the right sound.

 

I've been thinking about picking up a pair of Sennheiser HD650's or possibly waiting on a higher end headphone to fall within reach on the BST.

 

I just need thought from someone a bit more experienced than myself.

Is your music source a Windows PC? Mac? mp3 player? etc.

The Senn HD558 with the black rubber tape removed from inside the cups, has some decent bass.

And it's only 50-Ohm, so does not need much of an amplifier, which leaves more cash for the DAC.

The Beyerdynamic DT990 Pro 250-Ohm is good for the concert hall feel. but need more of an amplifier then the HD558.

post #15585 of 29490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ora M View Post

So, I received a pair of brand new ATH-M50 in the mail. After a good few hours of listening, I've come to find that, overall, I don't like them. I do like the bass of them though. Also, know that I like the trebles and the mids of my HD555, but it's a bit bass shy. I love my M5's, but I tend to find that the sub-bass is a bit too much. Otherwise it's an amazing IEM.

 

My budget will be around $300 USD. This will pretty flexible though since I may be saving a bit more.

 

I will be buying an amp and dac according to the headphone I choose. I've been contemplating about the Schiit Asgard and Bifrost.

 

The bitrate of my library varies from 156kbps (being the minority), 320kbps (only a few more than the previous), and FLAC (80% of my library.)

 

I listen to a bit of everything, but my library most consists of electronic music now-a-days.

 

This will be a 100% home set-up. I don't mind if the headphone is open or closed, as long as it has the right sound.

 

I've been thinking about picking up a pair of Sennheiser HD650's or possibly waiting on a higher end headphone to fall within reach on the BST.

 

I just need thought from someone a bit more experienced than myself.


 I think that you are on the right track--or at least one of them.  Take a look at the HD 600, which are faster, although some find them to be somewhat boring because they as so close to neutral.  I like them with my CD's and vinyl.

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