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post #31 of 449

This has become quite an interesting thread about EQ Apps and the updated title will probably bring more readers. beerchug.gif

If it wasn't for an EQ app "Equalizer" I'd be listening a lot less to my 2G Touch.


Edited by paulypaul - 12/31/10 at 11:06pm

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post #32 of 449

And for doing so I commend you - excellent members like you are quite appriciated, thank you & have a very "Happy New Year!!!"

 

Also, because of this thread, I'll be checking out the same app you've recommended (my wife & I have 2 iPhone 4's on the way as I type). Again, thank you. beerchug.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Br777 View Post

this thread has never been about creating custom eq settings via itunes.  in fact that has never been mentioned in this thread at all.  it has always been about eq apps.  I have however been editing the title to hopefully more closely reflect the overall idea, which i just did again.


Edited by tds101 - 12/31/10 at 11:34pm
post #33 of 449

In the new version of EQu do you have to import all your music again so that the app can analyze your songs, or will it allow you to set your eq with the songs already on your player?

post #34 of 449
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsupremous View Post

In the new version of EQu do you have to import all your music again so that the app can analyze your songs, or will it allow you to set your eq with the songs already on your player?



no importing. just play your music via tha app. and use the eq at any time, and save presets at any time.   when selecting music you can choose by artist, album, or playlist

post #35 of 449
I'm new to EQing and my only source gear is my Iphone 4. Is there a method you use to Figure out the EQ curve? Are you doing it by ear using a sine wave? Do you have a sine wave file on your iPod or is that included in the EQu app? I'm assuming that you EQ for the headphones and then do minor tweaking for different genres and that you're not messing with the EQ for every song. I'm going to read up a lot more on Equalizing but I figure that these are the questions that apply specifically to EQing with just the IPhone and the EQu app. Thanks for helping a new guy out!

Brandon
post #36 of 449

When I try to update EQu to 1.1.3 I get a message saying that it will only run on iOS 4.2 and later? Since you can't yet jailbreak an iPhone 4 beyond iOS 4.1 that means I'm locked out of upgrades... crap! 

post #37 of 449
It looks like this app may be useless to me because it won't play DRM Protectef music. Most of the music I listen to was purchased on ITunes. I have no idea if it's all DRM protected but I'm not going to buy an app that I can only use for half of my music.
post #38 of 449

It's too bad EQu or Equalizer won't work for you. But to answer your first question, you can EQ by ear until you like the result. Depending on the goals, that could be different for each person. I try to correct different headphones' responses so that acoustic recordings sound like what I hear from live performances. For anything below 1 kHz, I find that the graphs at Headroom are a good starting point. Anything above that has much more of a dependency on the shape of your ears and your ear canals. But with patience, you can fix that too.

 

If you want to be more objective, follow this tutorial: http://www.head-fi.org/wiki/tutorial-on-how-to-equalize-headphones . It works very well with some 'phones. I got better results with the previously-unlistenable ER4S that I did by calibrating by ear.

 

Comparing the two apps, Equalizer has the advantage if you want to EQ each ear differently. Also, when you're tweaking EQu, the numbers being displayed are off by a factor of 2. It says you're cutting or boosting by 3 dB but it's really 6 dB if you measure the electrical response. At least, that's true with an iPad as of version 1.1.3. I posted a note for the developer on another thread. I think this will be easy to fix. I hope he also fixes another problem: EQu 1.1.2/1.1.3 plays stuff that's not in the original music. When I play a pure tone, the output isn't a pure tone, but one with side bands +/- 85 Hz, ~50 dB below the main tone. The iPod app and Equalizer play this tone without these artifacts. It's hardly audible with most recordings and people here have no problem enjoying their music on EQu (myself included). Maybe I shouldn't have reported this (because people are going to start reporting phantom tones that they're not really hearing). Ah, audiophiles.

post #39 of 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonB View Post

It looks like this app may be useless to me because it won't play DRM Protectef music. Most of the music I listen to was purchased on ITunes. I have no idea if it's all DRM protected but I'm not going to buy an app that I can only use for half of my music.


But just as a note, that's not the developer's fault. Apple has DRM'ed tracks pretty locked down and I doubt there's any API for third parties to access them on the device. Fairplay-crippled tracks are always going to be a PITA to use (if you can at all) with anything other than an official Apple product or software and that's why so many refused to purchase them.

post #40 of 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriv View Post

It's too bad EQu or Equalizer won't work for you. But to answer your first question, you can EQ by ear until you like the result. Depending on the goals, that could be different for each person. I try to correct different headphones' responses so that acoustic recordings sound like what I hear from live performances. For anything below 1 kHz, I find that the graphs at Headroom are a good starting point. Anything above that has much more of a dependency on the shape of your ears and your ear canals. But with patience, you can fix that too.

 

If you want to be more objective, follow this tutorial: http://www.head-fi.org/wiki/tutorial-on-how-to-equalize-headphones . It works very well with some 'phones. I got better results with the previously-unlistenable ER4S that I did by calibrating by ear.

 

Comparing the two apps, Equalizer has the advantage if you want to EQ each ear differently. Also, when you're tweaking EQu, the numbers being displayed are off by a factor of 2. It says you're cutting or boosting by 3 dB but it's really 6 dB if you measure the electrical response. At least, that's true with an iPad as of version 1.1.3. I posted a note for the developer on another thread. I think this will be easy to fix. I hope he also fixes another problem: EQu 1.1.2/1.1.3 plays stuff that's not in the original music. When I play a pure tone, the output isn't a pure tone, but one with side bands +/- 85 Hz, ~50 dB below the main tone. The iPod app and Equalizer play this tone without these artifacts. It's hardly audible with most recordings and people here have no problem enjoying their music on EQu (myself included). Maybe I shouldn't have reported this (because people are going to start reporting phantom tones that they're not really hearing). Ah, audiophiles.

 

Good tutorial, but the comment 'This means that if you equalize pink noise so that every frequency sounds equally loud, your headphones will have an essentially flat response, and will sound as good as they possibly can with all types of music' isn't really true. A flat response and sounding as good as possible with all types of music are not necessarily the same things.

post #41 of 449

I like both of the apps, but with the great newest update to Equalizer, I have a hard time choosing which one to use now! L3000.gif

post #42 of 449



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriv View Post

 

 

If you want to be more objective, follow this tutorial: http://www.head-fi.org/wiki/tutorial-on-how-to-equalize-headphones . It works very well with some 'phones. I got better results with the previously-unlistenable ER4S that I did by calibrating by ear.

 


I checked out that thread. Very informative. If the apps listed had a sweepable sine wave, pink noise and some kind of visual software it seems that everything in that initial thread could be done by one app on the iPhone to give users a good starting point to EQ their headphones.  This could do for music what some of the photography apps do for photos.  It may be better technically to take pictures with expensive DSLRs and edit them in Photoshop but it is extremely fun to take pics with the iPhone 4 and tweak them with all of the photo apps. Similarly it may be more correct to eq headphones and songs with expensive audio gear but it could be very enjoyable to do it through apps on the iPhone or iPad.

 

I will be checking out at least one EQ app and thank you very much for this thread and responses. 

 

Brandon

 

 

post #43 of 449

I haven't tried the equalizer app yet, but I might this weekend.  I like the EQu app quite a bit.  I find myself really boosted the lows.  It really provides me with a fuller sound.  I have noticed the with EQu running the volume is decreased a few db as opposed to playing music from the ipad itself. 

Also, hopefully they will make it possible to fast forward your music.  Lots of time and lots of little things to be added I'm sure.  This is an awfully nice add though.

post #44 of 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonB View Post
I checked out that thread. Very informative. If the apps listed had a sweepable sine wave, pink noise and some kind of visual software it seems that everything in that initial thread could be done by one app on the iPhone to give users a good starting point to EQ their headphones.  This could do for music what some of the photography apps do for photos.  It may be better technically to take pictures with expensive DSLRs and edit them in Photoshop but it is extremely fun to take pics with the iPhone 4 and tweak them with all of the photo apps. Similarly it may be more correct to eq headphones and songs with expensive audio gear but it could be very enjoyable to do it through apps on the iPhone or iPad.

 

I will be checking out at least one EQ app and thank you very much for this thread and responses. 

 

Brandon


Yes, built-in calibration tools would make these apps nicer. But first things first--let's hope that they do a better job with the basics. I'd like to see Equalizer have a better UI, eliminate its low-frequency noise/distortion, and release a version that takes advantage of the iPad's screen space. EQu should fix the technical problem with its audio, display the right numbers in dB when adjusting its curves, and implement a way to jump to any position within a track.

Those should be first priority. Until then, we can use SineGen and Electri-Q to come up with the correction curves, as you suggested, then transfer them over to Equalizer or EQu. The shapes displayed by those two are accurate.
 

post #45 of 449
Thread Starter 

well i have now converted back to using "eqalizer" because he released a parametric update, which also alows you to enter specific values for gain, q, and frequency via the ipod keyboard.

 

it is much easier to use your fingers to manipulate the values than on equ.

the values via keyboard is what really got me though. you can be totally precise.

also it has the "precut"gain slider.

im finding that it is more stable and must use less resources or something too, because "equ" skips a lot and "equalizer" does not.

the display and UI are easier to work with on equalizer as well.

 

 

 

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