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I have found the holy grail of bass.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Wow, so I've been ordering headphones left and right off of Amazon trying to A/B and return whatever doesn't make the cut.  

Now I know that I've been doing this all wrong.  Let me explain.

 

So far, like many of you, I've been trying to find the headphone with the right balance of highs, mids and lows.  I had come to the conclusion that any one single headphone wasn't going to do it.  But IF any one, single headphone was going to get close, it would be the Beyer (and for many others of you it would be a Senn). 

 

I've been obsessing over the details between 770 vs. 880 vs. 990 vs. ohm vs. pro, trying to find the right bass. I've been worrying about having too much treble.

No more.

 

The solution was DSP. 

 

Background context:  I got my DT-770 last week and have been almost happy with them, but felt something was missing.  Today, I got my Asus Xonar U1 in the mail. 

THIS IS WHAT I WAS MISSING.

 

1. I have the 32 ohm cans.  You CANNOT drive these through regular hardware.  YOU MUST HAVE AN AMP.  To be more specific, you will not get the aural pleasure that a basshead truly needs by going from player to headphone directly.  You will get sound of course, and you could even get it at a competent volume.  You will not get loud, club thumping bass in your face.  You need an amp (or in my case a soundcard with headphone amp built in).

 

2.  All this obsessing over getting the right bass, mid, treble levels in addition to asking the headphone to provide an awesome soundstage is asking too much.  I just turned on the virtual 7.1 dolby DSP on my soundcard and this is what I believe I've been looking for, but never knew about. 

 

For the past hour, I've been listening to LTJ Bukem's Logical Progression (drum and bass) and holy Jesus H. Christ.  You are IN the club at full volume.  We frequently complain that EQing one frequency will "drown out" another frequency.  That is why one headphone cannot make two people happy, let alone one person.  But we've been messing with the wrong settings and looking in the wrong place.

 

The DSP lets your have that bass in your face experience without drowning out any other frequencies.  Why?  Because it's not really an increase in BASS that you need, it's the soundstage presentation that you need changed. 

 

I'm sure you've all been to a concert where the bass rattles your bones, but the vocals and treble can pierce you as well.  You get full representation of all things.  Well, you cannot EQ your way to this sound.  It must be done through DSP.

 

Now, I understand some of you purists hate DSP.  This thread is not for you.  But for those of you looking for what I've been looking for, give it a shot.

 

(OMFG, this setup sounds so good)


Edited by sugarkang - 12/9/10 at 3:21am
post #2 of 17

I've never tried it. I'll have to check it out as soon as I get a chance. Mind me asking what sound card you're using?

post #3 of 17

I'm looking into buying a pair of Beyer's myself ( still doing research in trying to seperate/categorize/and understand all the different models ( ohm and versions ).

 

Now that you mention the USB sound card, its interested me enough that I might actually pick it up ( or something similar )... I think my laptop needs a boost.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarkang View Post
I'm sure you've all been to a concert where the bass rattles your bones, but the vocals and treble can pierce you as well. 

 

Sure, that's pretty much why I stopped going to concerts.

post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarkang View Post
I'm sure you've all been to a concert where the bass rattles your bones, but the vocals and treble can pierce you as well. 

 

Sure, that's pretty much why I stopped going to concerts.

Same here... ugh

 

post #6 of 17

HeadRooms crossfeed is all the DSP that I need. It does bring up the bass level just a tad and seems to place it in front of you, and not right at the sides of your head.

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

HeadRooms crossfeed is all the DSP that I need. It does bring up the bass level just a tad and seems to place it in front of you, and not right at the sides of your head.


I'm not too crazy about how it rolls off the highs.

post #8 of 17

I would personally rather use a simple crossfeed plugin. The problem with simulating surround sound on headphones: 1. the recording is in stereo 2. your headphones are not speakers in a room and the processing your using isnt even the right type. If you insist on using these simulators then Id recommend Dolby headphone.
 

   

Just remember if it sounds good to you, by all means use it. You dont have to listen to me or anyone else.

post #9 of 17

The LCD-2 is the holy grail for bassheads, IMO.

post #10 of 17

^^IF you have good taste in bass. If you want simply maximum bass the LCD2 is probably not the best. For the best bass, a real subwoofer wins hands down. 

post #11 of 17

i definitely don't have rolled off highs. i have the brightness switch engaged and there is plenty of top end here.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbophead View Post




I'm not too crazy about how it rolls off the highs.

post #12 of 17

I hope the OP is right because right now I have a D2000 and the bass is weak.  In matter of fact, it's weaker than the esw9a and M50.  Of course, my last resort right now is to get an amp because I'm suffering from some serious disappointment, to the point of wanting to return them.  The first time I have ever encounter a headphone that didn't wow me the first time I heard it.  Don't get me wrong, the rest of the SQ is good, but I bought these for some bass.


Edited by soundeffect - 12/10/10 at 12:09am
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I'm actually using Dolby Headphone.  I didn't name it specifically because I thought I'd remain agnostic instead of actively try to promote a single type of sound.  From what I've read, there are some competing technologies available.  One is from DTS, example. 

 

By increasing the sound stage, it takes care of a number of things:

1.  evens out frequencies; feeling that songs have either too much/not enough bass is gone.

2.  reduces sibilance measurably.  Beyers are overly bright, but near perfect with Dolby Headphone.

3.  reduces ear fatigue because frequencies won't catch you off guard.

 

Don't get me wrong.  There is definitely an unnatural quality about it and I acknowledge that it's not 100% good with no side effects.  I think this is most prevalent in vocals, that may end up sounding a bit hollow, or echoey.  However, I also know that you can't have an opinion until you try it. 
 

Here's a comparison of my EQ settings with and without Dolby Headphone.

 

Dolby Headphone off (clean signal):

DT770.PNG

 

EQ with Dolby Headphone on:

 

DT770 DH.PNG

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EYEdROP View Post

I would personally rather use a simple crossfeed plugin. The problem with simulating surround sound on headphones: 1. the recording is in stereo 2. your headphones are not speakers in a room and the processing your using isnt even the right type. If you insist on using these simulators then Id recommend Dolby headphone.
 

   

Just remember if it sounds good to you, by all means use it. You dont have to listen to me or anyone else.



 


I'm using the discontinued Asus Xonar U1.  I needed to solve two problems:  1. electro-magnetic interference from my existing soundcard; and 2. power to drive the cans.  This card does both. 

 

The Xonar series is pretty well regarded, I think.  A lot of them have a setting for headphone impedance as well, and will adjust gain accordingly.  Incidentally, mine does not.  However, my underpowered headphone was the Beyer.  The HD-595, even though that one is 50 ohm, didn't need extra power.  I would not recommend this card if you have a 300 or 600 ohm can that needs driving. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by xite View Post

I've never tried it. I'll have to check it out as soon as I get a chance. Mind me asking what sound card you're using?

post #14 of 17
Dolby Headphone is incredible for bass soundstage in music, convincingly rendering it remote from the listener in a very speaker like manner. You have to have the right headphones for it though. I've tried lots of headphones with Dolby Headphone and few are really convincing, especially with bass.

There have been plenty of threads advocating Dolby Headphone with a channel mixer. I think the channel mixer is completely unnecessary if your headphones have good enough synergy with DH. DH simulates up to 5.1 speakers in a room. That includes stereo speaker. If the music has good stereo imaging (and DnB often does) umpixing is not required. Just let DH simulate stereo speakers and you're in for a treat.
Edited by ear8dmg - 12/10/10 at 2:07am
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGreen View Post

The LCD-2 is the holy grail for bassheads, IMO.


I'm gonna go with a properly driven SR007mk1 for a better quality of bass.

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