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DT880 vs DT990 | Comparison & Review - Page 6

post #76 of 143

I'd choose colored everytime. Why the hell am I gonna listen to something I find boring? To tell others "OMG, mai hedphonz is moar realer"?. I just wanna enjoy my damn music, not over analyze how imprecise I think it sounds. I hate to be Captain Obvious, but it's all personal preference. There is no right or wrong when it comes to which headphones we like.

post #77 of 143

Beyer headphones, IMO, are intended to be listened with IEC level outputs.  That is 120-ohm headphone outputs.  Their A1 amp has an output impedance of 100-ohm.  I always use an adapter for Beyer headphones.  I think it sounds better.

 

FWIW.  YMMV.  blah blah.

post #78 of 143

Bought some DT-990 250 ohm headphones today with next day delivery. All before checking this thread out. I ALMOST skipped them due to the dreaded "recessed mids" issue that people seem to toss around too much (me included). I just wonder how recessed they are compared to the old M50 and D2000. D2000 mids didn't feel recessed much at all to my ears and that's all that matters. This is when connected to a desktop amp though.

 

The DT-990 was my FIRST really expensive headphone back years ago before I knew much about headphones. I didn't have much knowledge at the time and had no clue when buying them that they were considered bass heavy and being very bright. This was probably 4 or 5 years ago. At the time I not once felt that they were too bright and had a lot of bass. Quite strange. I could have sworn I had the 32 ohm version, but maybe not. They never had the blue band around them, so maybe the seller sent me the wrong version at the time.

 

I normally don't like extremely bright headphones. Are these brighter than the Grado 325i? Doubt it. Right now I'm using a KRK KNS-8400 which is VERY bright, but luckily it's tamed itself a bit after burn-in.

 

I guess there is a 50-50 chance the mids of the DT-990 might not be good enough for me. I had ZERO issues with the D2000 mids and the mids on the DT-880 600 were very good. Right now as long as the mids are decent and not too recessed I'll be OK. This is going to be another of my fun headphones. I don't care of they're perfect. I guess if vocal quality is extremely bad I may return them. That's what worries me. I've been wanting to get these headphones again for a long time. It's nice the DT-990 is down to $180 now!

 

Hmm, are these brighter than the k601? A lot of people say those are, but they're not too bad to my hears. That's my current favorite headphone.

 

BTW I know the DT-880 600 or even 250 ohm version is probably better, but I just don't need another neutral headphone right now. I kept my k601 over the DT-880 600 when I had them both at the same time.


Edited by tdockweiler - 12/8/10 at 8:05pm
post #79 of 143

I found the mids of the Denon D2000 noticeably more recessed than those of the DT990 600ohm.  I've never heard the 250ohm version, but I doubt the difference is enough to make the mids more recessed than they were on the D2000.  If you thought the mids of the D2000 were okay, you'll think the DT990's mids are just fine.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

Bought some DT-990 250 ohm headphones today with next day delivery. All before checking this thread out. I ALMOST skipped them due to the dreaded "recessed mids" issue that people seem to toss around too much (me included). I just wonder how recessed they are compared to the old M50 and D2000. D2000 mids didn't feel recessed much at all to my ears and that's all that matters. This is when connected to a desktop amp though.

 

The DT-990 was my FIRST really expensive headphone back years ago before I knew much about headphones. I didn't have much knowledge at the time and had no clue when buying them that they were considered bass heavy and being very bright. This was probably 4 or 5 years ago. At the time I not once felt that they were too bright and had a lot of bass. Quite strange. I could have sworn I had the 32 ohm version, but maybe not. They never had the blue band around them, so maybe the seller sent me the wrong version at the time.

 

I normally don't like extremely bright headphones. Are these brighter than the Grado 325i? Doubt it. Right now I'm using a KRK KNS-8400 which is VERY bright, but luckily it's tamed itself a bit after burn-in.

 

I guess there is a 50-50 chance the mids of the DT-990 might not be good enough for me. I had ZERO issues with the D2000 mids and the mids on the DT-880 600 were very good. Right now as long as the mids are decent and not too recessed I'll be OK. This is going to be another of my fun headphones. I don't care of they're perfect. I guess if vocal quality is extremely bad I may return them. That's what worries me. I've been wanting to get these headphones again for a long time. It's nice the DT-990 is down to $180 now!

 

Hmm, are these brighter than the k601? A lot of people say those are, but they're not too bad to my hears. That's my current favorite headphone.

 

BTW I know the DT-880 600 or even 250 ohm version is probably better, but I just don't need another neutral headphone right now. I kept my k601 over the DT-880 600 when I had them both at the same time.

post #80 of 143

It was kinda mentioned in the first page but

are the A700/AD700 slightly similar to the beyer's in terms of the sound signature?

by which there is high treble, and recessed mids?

post #81 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2enty3 View Post

It was kinda mentioned in the first page but

are the A700/AD700 slightly similar to the beyer's in terms of the sound signature?

by which there is high treble, and recessed mids?



The AD 700 has a lot more treble than the DT 880.

And the AD 700 is lacking big time in the mids versus the DT 880. The AD 700 also has a huge pocket of air at times with nothing there its very weird.

And basically the no bass of the AD 700 also makes the treble stand out.

 

Really don't understand why people say the DT 880/600 has recessed mids put more mids on it and it'll start to sound bad/weird

Maybe their source has the recessed mids.


Edited by mibutenma - 12/8/10 at 10:24pm
post #82 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mibutenma View Post

 

Really don't understand why people say the DT 880/600 has recessed mids put more mids on it and it'll start to sound bad/weird

Maybe their source has the recessed mids.


I could never figure that one out, either. Since the DT880 doesn't really have a large quantity of bass, what would the midrange be recessed between? The treble and...nothing? I get that the DT880 doesn't have euphonic or warm mids--they're definitely on the slightly cold/analytical/dry side. But quantity-wise? I just don't hear this. It could be an amping issue, as I've used my 250 ohm version with a crappy headphone out on a newish HT receiver and the mids did sound a little hollow. With some decent voltage going through them, though, this goes away.

post #83 of 143

I completely agree and never quite understood the 'recessed mids' on the DT880 either. I think these cans are extremely linear across the spectrum... until you hit 6-8k, and then things get a bit spikey. rolleyes.gif

post #84 of 143

I've been thinking about this, and I believe where it comes from is an issue of semantics, not necessarily "faulty" perception. There is a basic rule of sonic voicing, and that is that no fundamental frequency can influence the tonality of musical information that occupies frequencies that are higher than it. The immediate rebuttal most people are forming in their heads even as they read this is the idea of bass "bleeding" into lower midrange. Let me explain. It's not the bass itself that's bleeding into anything. Bumps in the frequency response are just that. They have a peak, and they roll off in both directions. What you're hearing as bleeding bass is the roll off from the hump (usually centered somewhere in the midbass, at around 80-100Hz). The actual fundamental frequency at, say, 80Hz cannot affect the fundamental at 160Hz. It can overshadow it or be overshadowed itself depending on the amplitude of each band, but this is a different thing (actually, this is recession--we'll get to this).

 

However, the converse of this is that any fundamental frequency can affect the tonality of musical information that occupies the frequencies beneath it. This is because virtually all sounds consist of the fundamental and several overtones, which occur at fixed intervals above the fundamental. If, say, the upper midrange of a headphone is 6dB higher in amplitude than the midrange, an instrument playing at 440Hz will have stronger than natural overtones at 1760Hz (440 x 2 x 2), 2640Hz (440 x 2 x 2 x 1.5), and 3520Hz (440 x 2 x 2 x 2) and will likely sound "brighter", or perhaps "honkier" than on a headphone which does not have this tonality. This is just an academic example (though the W5000, for one, has measurements that resemble this, hence the "nasal" tone some listeners perceive).

 

Getting back to the "recessed" mids on the DT880, let's consider what a recessed midrange is. It's a tonality in which the bass and treble are higher in amplitude (allowing for Fletcher-Munson and proximity effect of the transducer) than the frequencies that fall between them. Applying what I have discussed above, the elevated treble would certainly directly affect information that occupies the midrange, whereas the elevated bass would have either an indirect (roll off) or nonexistent effect. However, the midrange on a headphone with a 5dB bump at 9kHz will sound similar to the midrange on a headphone that is otherwise identical except that it also has a midbass bump at 80Hz. While only the latter case will have truly "recessed" midrange, the characteristic tonality associated with midrange recession (dry/analytical/cold) exists in both. The "recession" of the midrange in the second headphone, then, is not caused by this tonality but occurs because the midrange is flanked by two elevated zones in the frequency response.

 

The DT880 does not, IMO, have elevated bass. Therefore, it cannot have recessed midrange. What it does have, and here is where semantics come into it, is forward treble. Tonally, the midrange might sound similar on a headphone with forward treble and another headphone with recessed midrange, but the two are not the same thing. This is where I believe the notion that the DT880 has recessed midrange comes from.

 

Just my two cents. People might hear things very differently, especially if they consider the DT880's bass to be elevated.

post #85 of 143

I'm sure this has been said already as I couldn't bring myself to read more than 2 pages of this thread but while I appreciate the comparisons, I feel to call the DT 880 or 990 better than the other isn't fair.

 

The difference is preference in sound; it's like saying a hamburger is better than a sandwich, or vice versa.

post #86 of 143

I wrote this in a review a while back, the 880 mids are in no way recessed, but they are very polite, almost compressed and pretty far back from the "stage". The mids are very clear and never overshadowed by other frequencies. Listen to ACDC with the 880. Boring.......zzzzzz. Listen to Norah Jones.....AMAZING! The 880 mids just don't do very well with fast or upfront music. Now you may like that sound and that is fine, but when i hear ACDC, I want my head bobbin'. It's called rock for a reason. And that's why they make Grado's....  

post #87 of 143

...or DT990's? I have found that with the bass and treble 'punch', they do rather well with rock and related geetary-shredage. wink_face.gif

post #88 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Lust Envy View Post

I'd choose colored everytime. Why the hell am I gonna listen to something I find boring? To tell others "OMG, mai hedphonz is moar realer"?. I just wanna enjoy my damn music, not over analyze how imprecise I think it sounds. I hate to be Captain Obvious, but it's all personal preference. There is no right or wrong when it comes to which headphones we like.


Which is yet another reason I like the HD650 over both the DT880 and DT990. The Beyers sounded too dry, with less body than the HD650. That combined with their much brighter sound signature make them less enjoyable to listen to with all kinds of music than the HD650. Yet again, that is my personal preference. I just hear WAY too many people that say they are too slow and boring, and I disagree with that 100%.

post #89 of 143

Mids were still too boring with the 990. Mids are the heart of rock and why Grado is the king.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sampson_smith View Post

...or DT990's? I have found that with the bass and treble 'punch', they do rather well with rock and related geetary-shredage. wink_face.gif

post #90 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Lust Envy View Post

 "OMG, mai hedphonz is moar realer"?

 

yes. where real = truly good sound, absolutely. (by which I mean a sense of the space, clear distinction of instruments or voices, full spectrum sonority, and pleasing sense of performance)

 

and of course, your spelling helps, too. :-)

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