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Amarra - Page 7

post #91 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r View Post


The AIFF file contains 100% of the data from the original song (the song is not kept on a redbook CD in the form of a file, despite how your OS may present it), hence AIFF is lossless.

I know what you meant by it, but that's not what that word means. If you don't believe me than so be it, but no need to continue this debate any further.

post #92 of 117

Opinions please.

 

I don't do much music streaming with my Mac's but having multiple libraries su*ks.

 

My wife and kids have MBP's

In my equipment closet I have a Mac Mini for the room / house.

I run my headphones off my MBP.

 

I have a Promise Thunderbolt Pegasus R4 4T RAID for my photography.

 

My thought is to consolidate all the music onto the Mac mini and get a Pegasus for that and call it a day.

My network is pretty stout with Cat6 in the walls and Cisco switches for the backbone.  I hang a few Airport Extremes for WiFi.

 

Should I be able to get consistent quality off the Mac mini  (12GB  480M SSD) ?

 

Would I make any changes to encoding?

 

Thanks

post #93 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

Amarra Demo:

 

http://app.streamsend.com/public/9h99/xcy/subscribe

 

I've been with Amarra for some time and like it.

The guys on the thread pointed me to XLD for import and conversion, then setting up MiDi for 96kHz output and running iTunes.

XLD would take your FLAC and convert it to ALAC for iTunes playback.  No sonic difference.  IMO

 

This method is free and sounds damn good.  Clean

 

 I found Amarra has a bit more warmth and that's my taste.

I did not like PureMusic at all.  IMO

Thank you! 


Edited by RUMAY408 - 12/2/12 at 6:24pm
post #94 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

Opinions please.

 

I don't do much music streaming with my Mac's but having multiple libraries su*ks.

 

My wife and kids have MBP's

In my equipment closet I have a Mac Mini for the room / house.

I run my headphones off my MBP.

 

I have a Promise Thunderbolt Pegasus R4 4T RAID for my photography.

 

My thought is to consolidate all the music onto the Mac mini and get a Pegasus for that and call it a day.

My network is pretty stout with Cat6 in the walls and Cisco switches for the backbone.  I hang a few Airport Extremes for WiFi.

 

Should I be able to get consistent quality off the Mac mini  (12GB  480M SSD) ?

 

Would I make any changes to encoding?

 

Thanks

Sounds like a nice NAS config. You shouldn't have any issues.

post #95 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxper View Post

Sounds like a nice NAS config. You shouldn't have any issues.

Actually with WiFi it appears I do.

 

I'm on my MacBook Pro retina WiFi connecting to the Mac mini shared iTunes library.  95% ok  5% dropouts.

Is there a piece of middleware that would buffer better than iTunes?

post #96 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

Actually with WiFi it appears I do.

 

I'm on my MacBook Pro retina WiFi connecting to the Mac mini shared iTunes library.  95% ok  5% dropouts.

Is there a piece of middleware that would buffer better than iTunes?

Just use a router for a hardwired connection?

post #97 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxper View Post

Just use a router for a hardwired connection?

yup

post #98 of 117

I took Amarra out of the mix and, surprise no dropouts yet.

post #99 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

I took Amarra out of the mix and, surprise no dropouts yet.

Implying Amarra was too intensive for the CPU? 

post #100 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxper View Post

Implying Amarra was too intensive for the CPU? 

Not sure.  I need more time without Amarra to see if the dropouts go away.

WiFi dropouts could occur with either application.

Common sense tells me if I get rid a piece of software it would be less susceptible to drop outs.

There may also be some cache product that would help

post #101 of 117

An interesting experience I've had a few times now is that I've been playing back music through iTunes and, as I had thought, Amarra as well (which is hidden behind the iTunes window). I felt that the music didn't sound as good as I remember it. Turns out Amarra was not running!

 

By the way, here's Amarra for $60. It's from an old promo that still works as far as I know.

post #102 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

Not sure.  I need more time without Amarra to see if the dropouts go away.

WiFi dropouts could occur with either application.

Common sense tells me if I get rid a piece of software it would be less susceptible to drop outs.

There may also be some cache product that would help

Open up Activity Monitor and Network Utility to monitor both your CPU/RAM usage and your WiFi connection tables. I would be very surprised to see Amarra taxing the CPU on such a strong computer. 

 

NK


Edited by Nick 214 - 12/2/12 at 11:19pm
post #103 of 117
Jaywalk3 wrote:
…and what happens when?…

 

Hi Jaywalk3,

 

Please don't take my reply as snarky but, there’s more to the world than we know or can measure today…As a recovering audiophile, you tend to be a bit more skeptical than some of us and less so than those who have never heard a truly high fidelity, high performance system.

Assuming you still own such a system, or have a friend who does, you may want to actually listen to several of the audiophile-focused players out there rather than falling back on the “bits is bits” argument. All it takes is an assistant, a demo version of X, Y or Z player, a pencil and paper to keep score, and some high rez material (though it’s amazing what a good player can do for a lossy compressed file). Amarra happens to make this task very easy because, due to the unique nature of how it works under the hood, it has a bypass switch. Have your assistant stop playback for a moment, then pop it in or out of bypass while you say which is “better.”

Once you’ve done the test, hopefully several times, then you can say either, “I don’t hear any difference (with this gear and room). ” or “I hear a difference (but I can’t explain it with what I know).” At that point, at least your opinion will be based on experience rather than supposition.

Strictly speaking, if “bits are bits” is all there is to digital audio playback, then the DAC input (F05 vs AES-3ID vs IIS) wouldn't matter as long as the AES receiver wasn’t dropping samples. That said, most of us would agree that the PHY layer does matter, mostly depending on the DAC design. If you ask most mastering engineers (the majority of which are with you in the  “bits are bits” camp and have decently resolving playback environments) if different DAWs sound different when playing the same file into the same DAC, they’d say, “Sure.” Yet, how can this be if  “bits are bits”? It can’t which points to secondary and tertiary effects that are subtle but still influential.

In head-fi.org and elsewhere, there's quite a bit of OPT (other people's time) taken up explaining and postulating on why “bits is bits” alone is a slightly myopic and extremely convenient position. It allows the adherent to say, “It can’t” without putting in the time.

post #104 of 117

If there is a difference, it is not because Amarra improves the quality of the recording. It just changes it, throws in some DSP stuff that wasn't originally intended to be there. These effects might sound better or worst for some. But they're not true to the original recording so the software is out of the question for any kind of purist.

post #105 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by chewy4 View Post

If there is a difference, it is not because Amarra improves the quality of the recording. It just changes it, throws in some DSP stuff that wasn't originally intended to be there. These effects might sound better or worst for some. But they're not true to the original recording so the software is out of the question for any kind of purist.

 

As far as I know, it doesn't alter the content in any way (unless you alter the built-in EQ or dithering is switched on), so this is incorrect. Way back I tried programs that try to enhance the music and they clearly distort the music. I had a problem with my computer once, years ago, where the treble had some harshness which turned out to be the result of iTunes Sound Enhancer somehow having been switched on.

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