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PS1000 Impressions Thread - Page 49

post #721 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by priest View Post
 

 

I continue to be amazed by how different our ears must be. I owned the GS1000i for quite some time, and sold it because I found it too bright in direct comparison to my PS1000, which I don't find bright at all. Much happier with the flagship. I had a similar problem with the RS1i, which I also eventually sold in favor of the RS2i, which I like better and find to be warmer.

 

On another topic for the crew, I've been away from this thread for some time, and I wonder if anyone has formed an opinion on the PS1000 vs the PS500. In other words, is there any real cause to consider it the sonic little brother of the PS1000? I've been auditioning the PS500 for a month or so and am still trying to figure that one out.

 

I actually found the GS1000 and PS1000 basically the same headphone with a slight preference for the latter due to slightly less piercing treble.

post #722 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glam Bash View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdanderson View Post

CONGRATS! My PS1000 / Woo Audio WA6-SE combination has treating me pretty well.

Big +1 to this. My PS-1000s love the Woo. I found the RCA 6FD7 to not have the bright upper mids low treble of the Sylvania and GE versions(drove me nuts on my HE-500 too). I'm not feeling any symptoms of upgraditis with this setup;)

 

Glad you are so happy with the PS1000 and Woo combo. The PS1000 has outlasted all other headphones for me, and I've had quite a few. I keep buying, but it's more of an existential reflex and an addiction than a need for anything "better."

post #723 of 1224
This thread has gone quiet since the Dubstep Girl controversy.
post #724 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony1110 View Post

This thread has gone quiet since the Dubstep Girl controversy.

 

 

Yup. Since it is the PS-1000 "official" thread, I'm reluctant to talk about my PS-500 headphones that I received (broken in by previous user) yesterday in the mail.  I do have all the pads to put it through its paces, though.  The G-cush, the L-Cush, The Senn yellow 414 pads and the TTVJ "Flats".

 

I'm looking forward to the G-cush testing, though.  I want to hear how the sound signature will present itself.  Hopefully, one day, I'll be able to hear a PS-1000 and compare the sound signatures of that vs. the PS-500.

post #725 of 1224

I was in the middle of the ''Dubstep Girl contreversy'' as you call it, and I don't mind reading about the PS-500, in the PS1000 appreciation thread, what I do mind is repetitive negative comments about, in this case, the PS1000. The way I see it, an appreciation thread should concentrate on the positive side of a brand, or model of headphone.

 

That being said, I have health problems, and I've decided that from now on, I would pick my battles, and this one is just not worth fighting.

 

I have compared the PS500 and 1000, and as good as the 500 are, for me, the 1000 just do everything right, bass, mids, treble, soundstage, as I've said many times before their weight is the only thing that bothers me about the 1000.

 

Now, the big question, are the 1000 worth the times the price?, common sense would lead me to say no, but as you might have already experienced, when we're dealing with emotions, common sense often goes out the door.

 

I consider myself VERY lucky to be able to own the whole 1000 familly, and it might encourage you to know that the PS are my favorite of the three.

post #726 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post
 

I was in the middle of the ''Dubstep Girl contreversy'' as you call it, and I don't mind reading about the PS-500, in the PS1000 appreciation thread, what I do mind is repetitive negative comments about, in this case, the PS1000. The way I see it, an appreciation thread should concentrate on the positive side of a brand, or model of headphone.

 

That being said, I have health problems, and I've decided that from now on, I would pick my battles, and this one is just not worth fighting.

 

I have compared the PS500 and 1000, and as good as the 500 are, for me, the 1000 just do everything right, bass, mids, treble, soundstage, as I've said many times before their weight is the only thing that bothers me about the 1000.

 

Now, the big question, are the 1000 worth the times the price?, common sense would lead me to say no, but as you might have already experienced, when we're dealing with emotions, common sense often goes out the door.

 

I consider myself VERY lucky to be able to own the whole 1000 familly, and it might encourage you to know that the PS are my favorite of the three.

 

The highest Grado that I've owned was the GS-1000.  With the PS-500, I'm now running the Fiio E10 amp / DAC to see how it performs in my setup.  It really has a warmness to the sound.  The PS-500, to be frankly was a bit too thick for my tastes.  I think I should apply the G-cush pads and put the PS-500 through a routine with those pads.  My RS1i with the comfy pads also displays a warmness too it, though not nearly as thick as the PS-500.  This Amp / DAC combo is really feeding the Grados with a somewhat different sound signature that tends to migrate more towards a neutral presentation to a warm presentation.  The lower end is also a bit punchier and has a good presence.  

 

I also have the Fiio D3.  A bit later, I'll be running an optical connection from my sound card to the Fiio D3 and then the analog outputs to the Little Dot I+ amplifier.  Up to this point, the Little Dot I+ amp has proven to have a bit of additional extension on the upper end.  Then again, this might be due to the tubes currently installed (not the stock tubes).  I suspect the D3 / Little Dot I+ combination will tweak the upper end a bit an provide some extended detail so the percussion becomes more prevalent. 

 

Time and the tests will tell, though.

post #727 of 1224

I've had a very interesting experience with my PS1000 recently. I really liked the headphones when I first got them earlier in 2013, but from the day I got them, there was a slight buzz in the left channel when low bass notes would hit. Having had my fair share of Grados in the past, I've experienced this problem before and didn't think much of it. I figured it was just a hair on the driver, but I could never seem to get rid of it. Additionally, the headphones would distort slightly when I turned the volume up, but having heard that other people experience this with the PS1000, I figured this was just par for the course. Besides, I don't listen at very high volumes anyway, so I figured this wasn't that big of a deal.

 

Well, after a few months, the fact that the left driver was still buzzing in my $1700 headphones was still bothering me, so I decided to send the headphones in and have them repaired under warranty. Boy, am I glad I did...

 

In some ways, I feel like I've received back a completely different set of cans. Not only is the buzzing in the left driver gone, but no matter how high I turn these up, I don't hear even a bit of distortion. These babies just sing now when I turn the volume up. In fact, I'm finding myself listening at higher volumes than I ever have because it sounds so damn good. Furthermore (and I know this is completely subjective), I just find myself enjoying these headphones so much more than I ever did before.

 

Has anybody ever had a repair experience like this with Grado? I feel like they did more than just fix the driver. It's as if they tuned the drivers in a different way. I know that John Grado tunes the headphones by ear, but does that mean that he actually tunes each individual pair, so each PS1000 could possibly sound different from others? Or is there a reference driver to which all production drivers are tuned to maintain consistent performance standards?

 

I'm curious to hear other people's thoughts. Regardless, you'll have to pry these from my head before I let go of them; that's how good they sound.

post #728 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by MellowVelo View Post
 

I've had a very interesting experience with my PS1000 recently. I really liked the headphones when I first got them earlier in 2013, but from the day I got them, there was a slight buzz in the left channel when low bass notes would hit. Having had my fair share of Grados in the past, I've experienced this problem before and didn't think much of it. I figured it was just a hair on the driver, but I could never seem to get rid of it. Additionally, the headphones would distort slightly when I turned the volume up, but having heard that other people experience this with the PS1000, I figured this was just par for the course. Besides, I don't listen at very high volumes anyway, so I figured this wasn't that big of a deal.

 

Well, after a few months, the fact that the left driver was still buzzing in my $1700 headphones was still bothering me, so I decided to send the headphones in and have them repaired under warranty. Boy, am I glad I did...

 

In some ways, I feel like I've received back a completely different set of cans. Not only is the buzzing in the left driver gone, but no matter how high I turn these up, I don't hear even a bit of distortion. These babies just sing now when I turn the volume up. In fact, I'm finding myself listening at higher volumes than I ever have because it sounds so damn good. Furthermore (and I know this is completely subjective), I just find myself enjoying these headphones so much more than I ever did before.

 

Has anybody ever had a repair experience like this with Grado? I feel like they did more than just fix the driver. It's as if they tuned the drivers in a different way. I know that John Grado tunes the headphones by ear, but does that mean that he actually tunes each individual pair, so each PS1000 could possibly sound different from others? Or is there a reference driver to which all production drivers are tuned to maintain consistent performance standards?

 

I'm curious to hear other people's thoughts. Regardless, you'll have to pry these from my head before I let go of them; that's how good they sound.

 

think i might have received a dud when i had them?
 
i had a buzzing problem but fixed it, though then i still had fatigue problems, they where bright as hell with very recessed mids and they seemed to get grainy and boomy easily as i raised the volume. the treble became very shrill at louder volumes, even at lower volumes seemed like my ears could constantly feel that edginess in the treble.

Edited by Dubstep Girl - 9/20/13 at 2:56pm
post #729 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubstep Girl View Post
 

 

think i might have received a dud when i had them?
 
i had a buzzing problem but fixed it, though then i still had fatigue problems, they where bright as hell with very recessed mids and they seemed to get grainy and boomy easily as i raised the volume. the treble became very shrill at louder volumes, even at lower volumes seemed like my ears could constantly feel that edginess in the treble.

 

It's quite possible that you received a dud, but I dunno. The unit I bought at first sounded quite different than what I had previously heard from a demo unit at a store. Now that I had them repaired, they just sound so much better.

 
It really makes me wonder how different the PS1000 might be from unit to unit...
post #730 of 1224

I think that upstream equipement has a lot more influence on the way we percieve a pair of headphone's sound signature than sample to sample variation, that and the fact that we all hear sound differently.

 

Oh! and I love my PS1000 by the way.

post #731 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post
 

I think that upstream equipement has a lot more influence on the way we percieve a pair of headphone's sound signature than sample to sample variation, that and the fact that we all hear sound differently.

 

Oh! and I love my PS1000 by the way.

 

I totally agree about upstream equipment, but my original point was not actually how they sounded different from the store to my own personal rig. My point was that the same unit, after repair, sounds very different on my own personal rig.

post #732 of 1224

I know, but you also said ''It really makes me wonder how different the PS1000 might be from unit to unit...'' so i was just giving you my two cents on that.

post #733 of 1224

Hopefully, there would not be a noticeable difference from unit to unit.  If that were the case, it could indicate some serious driver tolerance issues, if that were the case.  I'm not sure if Grado uses the hole punch method by opening back vents on the PS-1000.  I did read where it was done on the GS-1000, HF-2 and PS-500.  I'll have to get my little flashlight out and check out the PS-500 through the mesh to whats on the inside of the cup.  Also, I wish I had marked the thread where the mention of opening the holes was indicated by model.  To me it was quite informative as that is what was done on the SR series by modders on this forum to get more bass.

 

On the other hand, I'm kind of curious from those who have heard the PS-1000 vs. the PS-500 with the G-cush pads?  I'm finding the PS-500 quite a good performer in this area and would interested in seeing the differences between the two models in this configuration.


Edited by wje - 9/21/13 at 1:49am
post #734 of 1224

I have heard both the 500 and the 1000, but with their repective hearpads, I used to have confidence in Grado to use the best pads for their different models, but after hearing my SR80i with Lcush, I'm curious to hear how the 500 sounds with G pads, or RS1i with flats.

post #735 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacker45 View Post
 

I have heard both the 500 and the 1000, but with their repective hearpads, I used to have confidence in Grado to use the best pads for their different models, but after hearing my SR80i with Lcush, I'm curious to hear how the 500 sounds with G pads, or RS1i with flats.

 

Apologies to those members for not discussing the PS-1000 at the moment.

 

OK.  From my experience last evening, here's how it appeared to me. I utilized various tracks from Acoustic Alchemy, but didn't try any other genres other than the lighter jazz group.

 
PS-500 with G-Cush pads.  I felt that the music was effortlessly being played through the headphones.  It was airy, but also a great low end too, which kind of surprised me.  The sound stage was very obvious.  I felt like I was back about 10 rows from the stage.  The upper frequencies were not overbearing in the least, but airy as mentioned before.  I was surprised at how well it really sounded.  I thought the G-Cush pads would hurt the low end response a bit - or, at least from my readings that's how I understood it to be.  The comfort level was very good.
 
RS1i with the TTVJ "Flats":  The first thing I noticed after placing them on my head and playing the music was that I felt as though I was in the front row at the concert.  The sound was very much "in my face".  The instruments had stronger frequency presence.  The highs were pushed out and at me.  Though, not overbearing, but not nearly as smooth as the PS-500s with the G-cush pads.  The bass, too, was very apparent, and present.  It was quite strong.  The mids were right about where they should be. The "flats" pads were doing their typical thing by creating some ear discomfort at the 30 minute mark for me.
 
Final summary: The sound signatures in this configuration were much more different than what I had anticipated.  In this case, the pads really defined the sound that was being produced to a large degree.  This is less apparent when using both headphones with the same pad types (the 414 pads or the other pads from Grado).  How do I feel from these results?  I think the PS-500 will serve a great purpose when I have time to listen to my jazz or smooth jazz music.  Maybe, even with female vocals.  The RS1i would be useful if I were to listen to music that would be a bit more aggressive.  Sort of like something by Stevie Ray Vaughn or Joe Bonamasso with Beth Hart.  They would really excel in that configuration.
 
Now, for the benefit of the PS-1000 users who feel that the upper end on the headphones might seem a bit too powerful, I wonder if those members had a chance to try the PS-500 with the G-cush pads?  I suspect that maybe the sound would be a bit more tamed and possibly a bit more in the range of what they are seeking.  But, I only say this out of speculation as I have never heard the PS-1000s, but did own the GS-1000s briefly.  I also thought a few weeks back that quite possibly go for another GS-1000 if one were to appear on the market.  However, after experiencing the PS-500s with the G-Cush, I'll place a hold on those thoughts for a bit longer.  
 
The TTVJ "flats" are either a love it, or hate it type of pad.  In this, I speak more from a comfort perspective and less from a sound perspective.  The foam being a bit firmer - and less of it, can quickly work towards cutting a listening session a bit short due to some discomfort.  In fact, a few days ago, I had cut a few "donuts" out of some thinner felt.  I placed the felt between the pads and my ears and the comfort was a bit better and tolerable over longer periods of time.  Also, I don't feel that using the felt really affected the sound capabilities of the pads all too much.  I may look further for some thinner foam pieces (1/8" to 1/4" thick) and cut the donuts from that.  Again, another mission to see how the comfort would fare.
 
The source items used for this test.  The Fiio E10 used only in DAC mode and fed by my computer.  The signal from the E10 DAC, was then fed into my Little Dot I+ with tubes other than stock.  For the software to handle the music selections and pushing the output to the DAC was Foobar 2000 and I had the WASAPI driver in use.
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