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X-fi Go! Pro buzzing noise - Page 2

post #16 of 30

I am pretty sure they stopped manufacturing the non Pro version. Shops may still sell them but they may be old stocks. Heck the Non Pro card was even removed from Creative Official website.

As for X-Fi Go! supporting 24/48, I doubt you can differentiate the SQ between the SQ of 16 and 24bit with THAT CARD. Hell even the onboard sound in my PC supports up to 24bit/192kHZ format. Cards of that sound are made of very simple components, which means the signal produced will be rather noisy. It is better to buy a better soundcard that specify the SNR, TND and crossfeed values. 

post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by windcar View Post

I am pretty sure they stopped manufacturing the non Pro version. Shops may still sell them but they may be old stocks. Heck the Non Pro card was even removed from Creative Official website.

As for X-Fi Go! supporting 24/48, I doubt you can differentiate the SQ between the SQ of 16 and 24bit with THAT CARD. Hell even the onboard sound in my PC supports up to 24bit/192kHZ format. Cards of that sound are made of very simple components, which means the signal produced will be rather noisy. It is better to buy a better soundcard that specify the SNR, TND and crossfeed values. 



Ok, you that OWN a Go! Pro be happy with what you are, and accept the simple fact that the regular Go! is just better. Too bad, you should've known better before buying that. Oh, and The regular Go! is on their website. Lol at your claims. Go troll another topic.

post #18 of 30

nay, I am ok with my Pro. They are good for portable gaming. I also own a X-Fi HD which is superior to all stick size SC too. 

I thought i am here just to share my views on these stick cards but apparently I have offended some people unintentionally.

post #19 of 30

No no, I'm sorry if I sounded harsh frown.gif The thing is that virtually all those sticks are kinda crummy, and what I was saying is that even though they're on the lowest end of audio, they are still an improvement over onboard chipsets. Despite ALC1200 not being so bad as other onboard chipsets, I have absolutely no faith on such contraptions.

 

How do you feel about your X-Fi HD? Is the sound colored? Software still bloated? Because it is supposed to be quite nice.

post #20 of 30
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, thank you for all the feedback!  I'm glad there are some users on this forum that are familiar with these products.  The poster who said above that the buzzing is reduced in speaker mode is correct - I have only really noticed on headphone mode.  It was audible for me using headphones in headphone mode when listening to quiet music, and it seemed to cause some interference with some computer game music - I noticed the latter in Starcraft 2, for example.

 

I have decided to just go back to using my onboard sound (Realtek ALC272) for now.  I appreciate the information on the Go! versus the Go! Pro, and honestly, I'm rather annoyed that Creative would brand the newer product "Pro" if it has lost functionality from the previous model, but I guess I should have done my research before buying the Go! Pro, since the Go! was also available online when I purchased.  In any case, I think that, in the future I am going to upgrade to a higher quality sound card.  I have been reading about the X-Fi HD for a little while, so I might get that one, or a comparable model by another company. 

post #21 of 30
Hi. unluckily I'm a user of sound blaster x-fi go pro and have same issues as other people here. Usually I listen to medium quality mp3 are no audiophile so I choose this card. I'm owner of creative xmod cart too compared them and x-fi go pro has at least for me better sound quality than xmod if only that noises in quiet songs would dissapear. Luckily about 80% of songs that I listen to are louder and not slow so most of the time I don't hear it. Didn't find solution how to 100% kill the quiet noises but you can make them like 60-70% more quiet if you turn crystalizer to 100% and play a bit with equalizer. I was testing this only on one enya song (usually don't listen to enya but she is perfect test subject for this) and discover that noises are more quiet if you slide up first slider from the right on the equalizer.
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post #22 of 30
Guys, I think I discovered way to further eliminate the noise. If you are using windows go to audio setings and put wave slider to maximum (dfault it is on half). It made a miracle for me.

Edited by xmoduser - 4/8/11 at 5:47pm
post #23 of 30

is it true it have noise

 

or you are wrong

 

is there solution to it

 

which is better to buy

 

x-fi go

 

or

 

x-fi go pro

post #24 of 30

Holy crap I'm glad I found this thread...I was just about to upgrade my regular Go! to the Pro version because I had seen the Pro being labeled as 24-bit on many retailers' websites, whereas I couldn't find any info about the specs of the original Go! in terms of bitrate; I just naturally assumed that the Pro would be higher quality.  I was literally seconds away from placing an order on Amazon but decided to try a little bit more searching.  Good thing, saved myself 30 bucks.  Thanks guys!

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by murdercitydevil View Post

Holy crap I'm glad I found this thread...I was just about to upgrade my regular Go! to the Pro version because I had seen the Pro being labeled as 24-bit on many retailers' websites, whereas I couldn't find any info about the specs of the original Go! in terms of bitrate; I just naturally assumed that the Pro would be higher quality.  I was literally seconds away from placing an order on Amazon but decided to try a little bit more searching.  Good thing, saved myself 30 bucks.  Thanks guys!



It's great you didn't buy the Pro version as it is most certainly not an upgrade, feature and bug fix wise. Not that it is life changing, but the regular Go! has 24bits support while the Pro has 16bits.

 

Just keep and use your regular Go! as long as it works :)

post #26 of 30

Well, I got my SB Go Pro a couple weeks ago and it sounds great except for the buzzing and hissing, mostly in the left speaker on my jvc rx700 headphones.  I thought I would chime in on this thread and see if I can't get some emotional support, even though it's an old topic lol.  I like many here listen to all kinds of classical music and most of it is recorded at low volume, quiet, or has a lot of static since a lot of these recordings are old.  All that helps make the hissing and buzzing louder with this device.  I like it better than my IDT onboard but like I said the buzzing and hissing at some parts is very distracting.  One thing I noticed though is it works great with my coby cvh56 crap headphones.  They're actually pretty good despite being three bucks lol.  I can't say that about a lot of  cobys other products and headphones.  I guess I could just use those, they're not much worse than the JVCs.  The cobys just don't have all that fancy technology.

 

BTW, I had the other SB xfi go and it did not have the hissing or buzzing but one side gave out on it when I tried plugging in some headphones with a bent jack by accident,


Edited by AaronDude - 9/23/12 at 1:50pm
post #27 of 30

i think you should contact the dealer.... i tried one back in China, everything is fine...

post #28 of 30

I recently bought that usb external sound card device and it is vastly superior in its percieved audio quality compared to my existing chip set, which was an integrated virtual chipset instead of hardware.  I have a lap top.  The device is for the lap top.  It makes YouTube videos in standard definition sound as good as CDs on my laptop from when playing CDs with the old chipset.

 

I tested with classical music using Beethoven's 5th symphony and I have no complaints about lack of dynamic range.  The dynamic range is far superior to my on board integrated virtual chipset. I heard no buzzing noise during the quiet parts of the symphony.  I think the buzzing is a problem on your end from:

(1) Your headphones suck,
(2) You did not install the drivers correctly,
(3) Your usb port is broken, or

(4) Your device is broken (Return it and get your money back and buy a new one and try it and see if it works).

 

My on board chipset is "Conextant High Definition Audio".  I don't think there's much "HD" about it.  If that is "HD" for a laptop for Conextant, then I tremble at the thought of what the standard definition Conextant chip set sounds like.

 

Its for a laptop.  Don't expect desktop quality out of a laptop.  For those people who say that their on board chip set sounded better, they probably already had real sound cards instead of virtual chipsets because they have desktops not laptops.

 

I tested with Esser test tone generator and I found that this usb external sound card device did not produce audible sounds at frequencies greater than 17,400 Hz.  I am listening with Seinheiser HD 205 headphones that cost $150.  My onboard chipset produced audible frequencies for the full range of human hearing all the way to 20,000 Hz.  However, I don't care because I don't listen to music at frequencies higher than 17,400 Hz.

 

I don't know what people are talking about when they say that the SNR sucks.  Well it is the best I have ever heard but I have a laptop and the people who are saying that the SNR sucks probably have desktops.

 

 

 

Edit: I tested a ****ty recording of a guitar cover video that I made and I heard alot more hissing side by side comparison of Sound blaster go pro vs. onboard chipset.

Here is the test video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXQCFgI42kA

 

The problem is the source not the sound card, because no hissing was present in a better recording for this beethoven recording test video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOk8Tm815lE

 

I think you are listening to old recordings and that is the cause of the hiss.

 

The cause of the hiss is from vinly, which audio philes appear to prefer over CD quality for some bizarre reason.  You just don't hear the hiss because your onboard chipset doesn't have enough dynamic range to hear the hiss.

 

My guitar recording is using analog means to interface with the laptop, instead of using an audio interface.  Vinly also uses analog means to interface with the studio equipment.

 

The cause of not everyone hearing the hiss is that some people have hearing with greater dynamic range than others.  You lose dynamic range in your hearing with old age as the middle ear bones  become less able to perform mechanical impedence matching.


Edited by dietermoreno - 1/10/13 at 1:47am
post #29 of 30

Well now I bought an M-Audio interface for $79 (which has the added benefit of recording to Pro Tools and has phantom power for a mic), and I think the sound quality is much better than my on board chipset.

 

I already had the M-Audio interface for a couple months but I was only using it for recording and phantom power for a mic, until today I was forced to use it to listen to music because my Sound blaster Go Pro Usb sound card broke from an audio cable stuck in it because its too flimsly.

 

I think the quality of the M-Audio interface is comparable to the Sound blaster Go Pro, except I have mixed feelings about the crystalizer in the Sound blaster.

 

I think the crystalizer is what is causing the hiss.  A crystalizer tries to increase the dynamic range on dynamic range compressed audio.  Unfortunately, crap in = crap out.

You can't write an algorithm to guess perfectly how the audio should sound if it wasn't dynamic range compressed.  It has a tendency of thinking that white noise is dynamic range that should be increased.  I find that it makes YouTube and mp3s sound more punchy, but its a strain on the ears hearing all of the hiss that is an artifact of the crystallizer, so much strain hearing that hiss that it distracts from the bass response, which lossy compression is known for poor bass response, so that kind of defeats the purpose.  I find that it doesn't sound any better for CD quality and it actually makes CDs sound worse.

 

So all in all, I'm glad that my Sound blaster Go Pro is broken and I use M-Audio interface instead so I don't have to strain my ears with that high hiss and that extra loudness, which that extra loudness only makes YouTube and mp3s sound better.

 

All in all, crap in = crap out.  There is no way to get CD quality out of YouTube or mp3.  Just give up and use FLAC.  Oh, gasp, you have to actually buy the CD from the artist instead of iTunes or watching/torrenting on YouTube if you want good quality.


Edited by dietermoreno - 4/7/13 at 1:51am
post #30 of 30

I just think it's some component in the x fi go pro that should be shielded and it isn't.  That's the static I'm hearing.  Headphones that are harder to drive or less sensitive don't really have a problem.  Even on my new hp envy running just the windows drivers I hear it.  It still sounds miles better than the phoney beats audio chip in my new laptop.  LOL there is an option to disable the beats audio effects but it doesn't work and it hasn't worked on hp laptops for three years.  Other than that my syba c media usb sound card sounds much better than either of these.  Funny how it only cost me five bucks a year ago and it's so much better.  I could probably spend 50 bucks on a premium name brand usb sound card and still enjoy the syba better.

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