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American kids, dumber than dirt; is it really this bad? - Page 5

post #61 of 163

Pft, you all missed the point.  Its about the black ooze and our secret pact w/ aliens.  Don't forget the Smoke monster.  I think the fact that most Americans were able to watch more than 3 episodes of LOST is a prime example of the topic at hand.  

post #62 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by nealric View Post



 

So you lambast people for lacking common sense, then admit to being a conspiracy theorist? 

 

irony2.jpg
 


that's right.

post #63 of 163

My experience of Americans is that they do lack knowledge of the history and geography of the rest of the world. That is not to say they are stupid or anything, it must just be down to education and a bit if an insular streak. 

post #64 of 163

I managed to watch two episodes of Lost before i felt the urge to remove the plug from the tv.

I lost the will to live when ,after 20years mending diesel generators ,i saw the word "Hot" embossed on the exhaust system of a new model!! I found that you knew it was hot when you left your finger prints on it ,you only did it once.

It would seem that our kids are just as dumb as yours.Or at least someone thinks they are.

post #65 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

My experience of Americans is that they do lack knowledge of the history and geography of the rest of the world. That is not to say they are stupid or anything, it must just be down to education and a bit if an insular streak. 



I was quite well educated in world history during my high school years. Two years of high school was studying world history, one year of US History, and one year of US Government and Politics, so people not knowing about world history is not the fault of the schools, at least in NY.

 

The problem is that the education system varies so much from state to state. In New York, there are very high standards for education, with state-level standardized tests and teacher evaluations. Sure, some people are just dim, but I felt well educated in every area in high school except for English, but that was due to a poor teacher for two years in whose class we did not do a single thing the whole year (literally). Until George Bush's "No Child Left Behind" push, it was up to individual states to make sure that their educational systems were up to par, and many of them weren't.


Edited by revolink24 - 10/24/10 at 11:42am
post #66 of 163

Since you mention George Bush (and I am referring to W) he was famous for not having a passport and his lack of knowledge of international matters as he campaigned for president. The one area I found the US was far better informed than us here in the UK was events during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. The Boston Globe and NY Times carried far more stories than any UK paper.

post #67 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

My experience of Americans is that they do lack knowledge of the history and geography of the rest of the world.


Just saying, that can be said about many students and individuals in other parts of the world. When my mother moved us to India when I was in the 5th grade, I actually had a long standing argument with my Geography teacher (yes, geography teacher) and another student who had also moved to India as well as a couple of others with regards to whether Alaska is really bigger than Texas. The argument refused to abate itself until I finally had to drag my globe to school to prove the point visually.

post #68 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by revolink24 View Post


I was quite well educated in world history during my high school years. Two years of high school was studying world history, one year of US History, and one year of US Government and Politics, so people not knowing about world history is not the fault of the schools, at least in NY.

 

The problem is that the education system varies so much from state to state. In New York, there are very high standards for education, with state-level standardized tests and teacher evaluations. Sure, some people are just dim, but I felt well educated in every area in high school except for English, but that was due to a poor teacher for two years in whose class we did not do a single thing the whole year (literally). Until George Bush's "No Child Left Behind" push, it was up to individual states to make sure that their educational systems were up to par, and many of them weren't.


actually the state education has nothing to do with teaching history or geography.  if it were all id know about history is the industrial revolution and the russian revolution.  as for geography i could tell you cloud types, soil types, population trends but nothing as to the location of anything.

post #69 of 163

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post




actually the state education has nothing to do with teaching history or geography.  if it were all id know about history is the industrial revolution and the russian revolution.  as for geography i could tell you cloud types, soil types, population trends but nothing as to the location of anything.



Huh? It has everything to do with our educational system. The state defines the educational curriculum. In NY, the NY Board of Regents determines what should be included in the curriculum and standardizes it, as well as creates the final exams that determine who passes the class.

 

http://nysedregents.org/


Edited by revolink24 - 10/24/10 at 4:00pm
post #70 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

My experience of Americans is that they do lack knowledge of the history and geography of the rest of the world. That is not to say they are stupid or anything, it must just be down to education and a bit if an insular streak. 


I think history isn't too bad but geography is pretty bad. I was never taught anything about geography. My geography isn't the greatest but I also wasn't taught it outside of certain big countries mostly in europe.

post #71 of 163


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post


I think history isn't too bad but geography is pretty bad. I was never taught anything about geography. My geography isn't the greatest but I also wasn't taught it outside of certain big countries mostly in europe.



I had to take a Grade 12 Geography course before we learned about any geography outside of say, the G20 and any country of general knowledge (Iraq, Kuwait, Vietnam, etc...). The Grade 11 one was bogus. The other class, I think Politics or something similar, only had to do some 40-50 countries. We had to learn all 160 of them. .___.

I don't think it has as much to do with the education system than the students. I just don't think they're motivated to learn or that they even care. They just don't like to learn unless it's in some kind of game or fun way. That has led to schools dumbing down the curriculum so 50% of the students won't fail. And since the curriculum is worse, students are even less motivated to learn. 

I go to a ridiculously bad school. And I can safely say I'm one of the top 5 students in the school because the school is just that bad. But I'm in Canada, so I can't speak for the Americans. I can't imagine it'd be any worse however.

post #72 of 163

When I was in school there was no class where I had to know where any country was. There was no geography class on other countries or even the states in the US iirc but it has been a while since those classes so I may be mistaken about the latter. I also don't really care where countries are located on a map really either.

post #73 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

Since you mention George Bush (and I am referring to W) he was famous for not having a passport and his lack of knowledge of international matters as he campaigned for president. The one area I found the US was far better informed than us here in the UK was events during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. The Boston Globe and NY Times carried far more stories than any UK paper.



 And you would not need to be a genius to work out why.

 

Lets face it not to many care what happens there.

post #74 of 163

I don't know if I agree with conspiracy theories, but it's clear that the American government, and both political parties, are too deeply influenced by a few powerful corporations and wealthy individuals. The recent Supreme Court decision that allows for unlimited campaign contributions by corporations will only make this worse. If we want America to be a democracy, we have to prevent wealthy groups and individuals from simply buying victories in elections.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin View Post

You forget the linchpin of wide reaching conspiracy theories. The different political parties are actually fronts for the real power behind America. The point of the political parties is to convince the populace at large that they are in control of their government by offering superficial choices on unimportant issues. In reality, the masters of America (either Illuminati/Freemason if going ancient, or CFR/Bilderberg/Trilateral Commission if going modern) control America's destiny from behind the scenes and generally display a Hari Seldon-esque knack for directing the flow of history without tipping their hand to us hopelessly uninformed rubes.


Edited by Antony6555 - 10/25/10 at 12:49am
post #75 of 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antony6555 View Post

I don't know if I agree with conspiracy theories, but it's clear that the American government, and both political parties, are too deeply influenced by a few powerful corporations and wealthy individuals. The recent Supreme Court decision that allows for unlimited campaign contributions by corporations will only make this worse. If we want America to be a democracy, we have to prevent wealthy groups and individuals from simply buying victories in elections.
 


That is far more worrying than any conspiracy theory. The corporations must love conspiracy theories as they provide a distraction for some and put off the many from having a serious debate.

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