Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › A Netbook for my new uDAC2 and Grado Headphones, Maybe?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A Netbook for my new uDAC2 and Grado Headphones, Maybe? - Page 2

post #16 of 25

I've got xP on my Netbook. Works ok, but I wonder if the wee Asus can handle Win7?

post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 

I have heard from several sources that Windows 7 actually runs very well on netbooks. That is compared to Windows XP and possibly even better than Linux. However Windows 7 costs $100 here in Canada. Netbook Ubuntu is free except for my time. Time could get to be substantial by the time I got everything working. So then it depends on your point of view.

 

Am I saving a $100 and enjoying many hours of tinkering with a new toy? OR Am I saving $100 and spending ridiculous amounts of time trying to get the computer running again?

post #18 of 25

I've tried OS X, Ubuntu, Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Starter and Windows XP on various netbooks here an there.  Except for starter, I tried the other four on my 1215N each separately for a week each.  OS X was only for a few days, since the drivers aren't quite right yet, but I did run it on an HP 210 for about three weeks.

   Windows 7 Home Premium (or above) takes the cake for best netbook OS out right now.  It's speedier than XP and looks a lot nicer, the battery life optimization is better than all the other OS's and it's about as easy to use as OS X (easier in some ways).  Ubuntu is great (and I've always been an Ubuntu fan), but it's not worth sacrificing almost 25% battery life in some cases. 

   I'm an apple fan, I loved my Mac Book Pro (2007 model) until it died on me recently (not video card related, but logic board stuff).  But OS X just isn't made for netbooks.  Battery life was about the same as Ubuntu, but a lot of windows aren't sized right for smaller netbook screens. Wireless issues are also a pain to work out.  But it is Hackintosh, not officially sanctioned by apple.  I can see why they'd want it to be a pain, it is there business model after all (they control the machines OS X goes on).

   XP was XP.  I think anyone that's used a computer in the last 10 years has used XP.  It's a great, simple OS but I feel like Windows 7 is all around better than XP.

 

Audio quality-wise, getting the right drivers, audio player and DAC can make each of them about on par.  They are, after all, just giving off 0's and 1's in the end. 

 

I'd say stick with Windows 7 (assuming you're not using Starter, I'm not a starter fan just because I change my background like 3 times a week and Starter doesn't allow this). But in the end, if you're staying plugged in or not demanding the best battery life your netbook can provide, the OS really doesn't matter.

 

Ubuntu is a lot of fun too.  I'd at least try it out.

 

@Sparky14 - If you can run XP on your netbook, you can run Windows 7 32-bit for sure.  A fresh install of Windows 7 just feels snappier than XP.  It's a very polished OS.  If you can pay (or have other means, like working at a Uni), I'd say give it a whirl.

 

@Tiddler - I think one of the most enjoyable parts of Linux is getting everything working.  It can be frustrating, but the fun isn't just in getting the OS but getting it going too.  I think of Linux as being the LEGOS of operating systems.  Half the fun is putting it together, then playing with the finished model, then strip it down and do weird things with it.  If you're really worred about it, Ubuntu is a great stepping stone.  Most (if not all) of what is needed is already there, it's a very easy OS to get going.


Edited by Bomo.is.ooc - 10/8/10 at 10:01am
post #19 of 25

the new asus netbooks are supposedly better than the old i remember reading, you may want to check out hp netbooks i think they had some good ones

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky14 View Post

I've got xP on my Netbook. Works ok, but I wonder if the wee Asus can handle Win7?



Yeah, Win7 is actually not hard to run at all its very effiencent.  Its the standard for any new netbook really.  It is less intensive than Vista, the only issue is XP can run well on 512mb of ram Vista & 7 should have 1GB or more of RAM to run well.  Esp Vista.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiddler View Post

I have heard from several sources that Windows 7 actually runs very well on netbooks. That is compared to Windows XP and possibly even better than Linux. However Windows 7 costs $100 here in Canada. Netbook Ubuntu is free except for my time. Time could get to be substantial by the time I got everything working. So then it depends on your point of view.

 

Am I saving a $100 and enjoying many hours of tinkering with a new toy? OR Am I saving $100 and spending ridiculous amounts of time trying to get the computer running again?



Ugh maybe things are different in Canada, like I said all of the normal netbooks come with Win7 these days, and when Win7 was just comming out Asus had a free upgrade program so you can get a free copy of Win7 for your XP netbook.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RockinCannoisseur View Post

the new asus netbooks are supposedly better than the old i remember reading, you may want to check out hp netbooks i think they had some good ones


I had one of the first Asus netbooks the EEE 1000H it was super great.  It did everything it was supposed too and was one of the best netbooks on the market.  Problem is netbooks got so popular Asus (and most of the other manufacturers as well) started to make a ton of half assed models to just increase there selection and get more sales rather than just stick with the nice models.

 

There are so many EEE models now that even I as a laptop reviewer do not know them all.

 

While Asus is my most recomended brand for a netbook, if you would like a "super netbook" Alienware has the M11X witch is pretty popular and a lot more robust than other netbooks.  Though its much heaver, 11" instead of 10" and much more expensive so its a lot more like a netbook/laptop hybrid than what I would call a pure netbook.

post #21 of 25

+1  4  m11x that indeed looks bOss.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockinCannoisseur View Post

the new asus netbooks are supposedly better than the old i remember reading, you may want to check out hp netbooks i think they had some good ones



The latest Asus models are much nicer than the previous models, which were pretty much tops to begin with, but they have their kinks.  The 1215N, for example, has some display issues (flickering on occasion and not waking up correctly) that exist but are pretty isolated.  In comparison to the original Eee pc (700), they're miles ahead.  Netbooks in the $300-$400 range are on par with budget/consumer laptops of 1-2 years ago (if you buy the newer pine view models), but with a smaller body and often better battery life.

 

My 1215N gives my G73 (Asus's top tier gaming laptops) a run for its money when it comes to my over all usage.  More often then not, I'm on my couch listening to music with friends while on my netbook.  It trounces all over the lines of what a netbook can and can't do.  With the 1015N coming out with similar specs, but a smaller form factor, netbooks are only going to get more amazing.  The only thing truly holding this form factor/price point back is Intel.  They have such archaic and nonsensical limitations on their Atom chips that's it's almost ridiculous.  For example, a very limiting memory controller which can only recognize (at tops) around 2.8gb of DDR3.  Then the limitations that Intel also has imposed on nVidia's Ion chips that hold it back even further.

 

It's kind of funny that the company that once touted netbooks so much (Intel as a part of their World's Ahead or w/e it was called) is the one that's holding it back.

post #23 of 25

I am extremely happy with my 1201N. The only thing the 1215 has on mine is DDR3 and Nvidia Optimus. But, if all you're going to use it for anyway is as a musical source while you're at work, anything more than my 701, one of the very first "netbooks", would be considered over kill, IMO. I have my 701, power cable, portable HDD, uDAC, and a few other nick-nacks and it all fits my sling bag. Have a regular back pack? All that stuff, and a pair of full sized cans would fit easily.

 

 

The M11X is way rad, but unnecessary for this topic..

post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 

Got it all together now! L3000.gif

 

So here is what I ended up with.

 

Computer:  Acer Aspire One Netbook, Windows XP, 160 GB HD

Media Player SW:  Foobar2000 v1.1

USB DAC:  uDAC-2

Headphones: Grado 125i

 

I'm listening to Jose Stone  while posting this update and loving it.beyersmile.png

 

I still need to go through my CD collection and rip them all to flac.

 

Thanks to everyone who passed on their advice and encouragement.

 

Cheers

post #25 of 25

I am in a similar situation and went a similar route.

My setup is Acer Aspire One->TASCAM Us-144 as transport->(Broken external DAC I still need to fix)->PPAv2->Grado 325i.

I've tried the netbook with ubuntu netbook remix, xp, and win7 ultimate. I've chosen to go with win7 as it has drivers for my 144 and integrates with the rest of my home network. 

Linux just never seemed to work right for me, it was always just a little 'off'. Hard to describe, I was just always fighting with it to get it to do what I wanted. Eventually I got tired of it and went back to windows. I never was able to get the TASCAM to run right under linux (you have to connect it as a usb 1.1 device).

One problem that I have found with the netbook is that it stops and stutters, especially when playing internet radio. The performance is seriously lacking.  It's a wonderful thing for trips, but even as a simple office music player, I'm not very satisfied with it. I wouldn't recommend it for playing movies either. Sometimes they work for me, sometimes they don't. It just depends on how high the quality is. I like that it is so small, but I can't do anything with it while playing music without it adding some artifacts. If I were to do it again, I would buy the smallest regular laptop that I could find.

 

Just a word of caution, I would check with your IT dept/ IT policy to make sure that you're allowed to hook anything up to your company computer. Don't just go by what your boss says. I've been fired from a job at a bank for having an external hard drive with music on it hooked to my computer. My bosses were fine with it, corporate was not.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Computer Audio
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › A Netbook for my new uDAC2 and Grado Headphones, Maybe?