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Audio Technica CKM70 vs Radius TWF11R [REVIEW]

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

[EDIT]

After rereading the review and taking in to account some comments it received, i realised that some very important parts were rather vague. Like the neurotic i truly am, i decided to rewrite the parts that concern the sound, trying to be more precise and thorough this time around. I am looking forward to more of your opinions and constructive criticism.

 

  Although Audio Technica is a well known and respected brand here, not many head-fiers had the pleasure to give the ATH-CKM70 a try. I was lucky enough to get these as a gift from James, so i decided to post my impressions on this relatively unknown iem. I will also be comparing them to the more well known Radius TWF11R, to offer a point of reference.

 

 

  So, in the left corner, wearing a silver/black housing, and sporting a 12.5mm dynamic driver, a sensitivity of 106db, an impedence of 16Ω and a frequency range from 5 to 24,000Hz, we have the Audio Technica CKM70 :

 

(the Silver Surfer ...)

CKM70.png

 

 

  In the right corner, wearing a red/black housing, and sporting a 15mm dynamic woofer, a 7mm dynamic tweeter, a sensitivity of 105db, an impedence of 24Ω and a frequency range from 10 to 18,000Hz, we have the Radius TWF11R “DDM” :

 

(... vs Optimus Prime)

DDM.png

 

 

  Build quality, fit and comfort:

 

 

  TWF11R:

 

 

  Well, it's plastic all over, but durable and of a good quality. The strain reliefs on the cable are well placed and do the job quite well. The cable itself is good for a nylon cable and that's the only nice thing I can say about it. It has more memory than my pc, and microphonics are present, although to a lesser degree than i was expecting, thanks to its rather light weight.

 

(good build quality, relatively poor usability)

streign-rel.png

 

(the nozzle has an air duct on its base, try not to choke it when wearing them)

ddm.png

 

  The most controversial part about the Radius is the fit. The nozzle of the phone is long and thick, so large tips are uncomfortable with the DDM. It also pushes allot of air, so tips that offer a tight seal are a no go for the non bassheads. They choke the airflow, making the bass too prominent and boomy, overwhelming the mids and masking the treble. After some trial and error, i found out that pipe shaped tips with a big aperture and a thin rim offer a very balanced sound with reasonable bass, that doesn't bleed into the midrange and lets you actually hear the treble. With these tips, the Radius, ironically, are the most comfortable iem i have ever used. They unfortunately offer very little isolation without music playing through them.

 

(small single flanges like these are highly recommended with the DDM)

tips2.png  

 

(comfortable fit that doesn't choke the air duct)

DDM-ear.png

 

  CKM70:

 

The build quality is simply OMG for a pair of phones you can get today for around 80$ (from Japan). Aluminum and scratch resistant plastic have been used to create one of the most good looking iems i've ever seen (pictures don't do them justice). The cable is fat and sturdy, but also heavy, so although there is no memory effect, you will get allot of microphonics. On the up side, you can wear them over the ear without looking like a cybernetic life form (Radius I am looking at you), greatly reducing the aforementioned microphonics. Fit is nice and comfy, and isolation is average.

 

(pretty and sturdy)

streign-rel-ckm.png

 

(straight down looks better, over the ear works better)

ckm70-ear3.png

 

  Sound:

 

 

  TWF11R:

  The TWF11R offer a relatively thick sound that is a tad worm but well balanced. They also are, to my initial surprise, rather flat, as can be shown by their frequency response graph:

 

(graph shamelessly stolen from mobile-review) 

radius.png

 

  Dynamic range is good but resolution is average. Having average resolution, they don't play all that well with badly compressed tracks. Distortion , especially in the mids, sounds prominent, as it masks most other contents in the frequency range.

 

  Transparency is another area where the DDMs are lacking a little. The main perpetrators are their recessed treble and an unconventional imaging (more on that latter). Still, the DDM manages to produce an extremely detailed midrange and low end, so it's not all bad.

 

  The 24 Ohms impedance makes sure that these are very easy to drive, but the Radius do love the extra juice when available. Background hiss is surprisingly inaudible for a low impedance iem.

 

  Soundstage varies greatly from recording to recording. Although it can be quite intimate sometimes, it always retains an out of the head feeling to it. On the other hand, there are times when the soundstage becomes very wide, with an unusual depth for an iem, conveying both space and distance very well. Imaging is similarly varied. Sometimes it's fairly precise, sometimes the Radius take some surreal liberties with the direction of the sound, resulting in sounds coming from behind or above you. This may not suit the analytical freaks out there, but it's quite pleasant and immersive when it happens.

 

  Sometimes, more often than not with mp3 joint stereo, the separation is lacking and the positioning is fuzzy. Instrument separation is also done unconventionally. Instead of dissecting each instrument, the DDM blends them together, layer upon layer, and manages to do that without sacrificing detail. You will still be able to tell the instruments apart, but the presentation will sound more like a live concert than a recording, sacrificing some transparency to increase immersion once again.

 

  The bass is very well extended and detailed. It's more polite than punchy, and reaches very low. Quantity is a little more than i would prefer, but since it is polite, well controlled and doesn't invade the mids, it's easy to get used to. Attack speeds are better than expected considering their sound signature. They may not excel with very fast metal or electro but they can handle them. Decay and reverb are just right for natural instruments, but not the best for electronic sounds that sometimes have next to no decay. Drums, double basses and bass guitars sound very detailed and natural.

 

  The mids are the selling point of the Radius. Prominent, full, very detailed and textured. Vocals and most instruments reside here and they sound excellent, conveying detail, along with plenty of emotion and feeling. If you like string instruments, this is the iem to get. The tonality, weight, depth, texture and fullness of pianos, guitars, violins e.t.c. is probably the best you can get in their price range. Vocals get the same treatment, with the exception of female vocals in the soprano range, due to the DDM's frequency dip in the high mids.

 

  What deserves a special mention is the extreme detail of the texture of the sounds here. Chorus, brutal vocals, distorted guitars and every other similarly complex sound is reproduced to perfection. The down side of this is that in some non ideal situations, like badly compressed music and/or low quality/underpowered dacs, the aforementioned detail can sometimes become a little grainy, detracting from the refinement of the sound. This isn't very noticeable though, and it can be completely avoided with good quality equipment and tracks.

 

  The treble is plenty and well extended, but very polite (probably too polite for the treble freaks out there) and a little recessed. It's also very dry, demonstrating a difference between the tuning of the twitter and the woofer. This is probably a conscious choice, as the tweeter seems to be responsible for the minute details added in the texture of the mids. The side effect is that instruments like cymbals have little decay, and are positioned too close to the mids. Brash instruments and solo violins also lack sparkle. So if sparkly highs and airy cymbals are a priority to you, better look below.

 

  CKM70 :

 

  The CKM70 produce a sound that is neither thick nor thin, neither cold, nor warm, if maybe a tad bright. They are also rather flat, neutral and balanced. Their frequency range, combined with a very good dynamic range, is impressive, allowing them to be a true all arounder. Transparency and resolution are two other areas the CKM70 covers very well.

 

  Soundstage has a more fixed size to it compared to the Radius, and is on average a little wider but has less of a depth. Imaging is good and consistent, and the presentation is very airy. Stereo separation is also quite good, as is the separation of instruments.

 

  The 16 Ohms impedance makes sure that these are very easy to drive, but there is a small quantity of background hissing. Amping them does offer some improvements, but the DDMs seem to benefit a bit more.

 

  The bass is well extended, tight, punchy and well defined. Quantity is ideal, less than the DDM but more than something like the re0. Bleeding in the mids is non existent and detail is quite good. Attack speeds are greater than the DDM's and decay is shorted, but not too short. It can reproduce fast metal and electro well, without staying too far behind the DDM in tonality.

 

  The CKM70 seems to also have a similar dip to the DDM in its frequency response, but this time it affects the low mids instead of the high mids. The mids in general sound smooth and clean. Where the audio technicas lack in texture compared to the DDM, they make up for with detail. An acoustic guitar might sound a little better through the DDM, but the CKM70 will allow you to better hear the sound of the plectrum plucking the strings. Timbre is also very good, close but not quite to the DDM's level.

 

  The treble is simply great. Sparkly, with great extension and definition. The CKM70 manages to produce a good amount of detail here, without sounding piercing or harsh. Sibilance is also not an issue unless the recording already includes it. Saxes and violins are reproduced with a good amount of detail and the proper timbre. Cymbals sound wonderful, airy, detailed, with excellent decay.

 

 

  Conclusion:

 

  Most iems in this price range, sacrifice some areas, in order to be great at some other areas. The DDM falls to this category. The good news are that despite some quirks, where the DDM performs it's truly excellent. If you are a performer of a string instrument, you will really appreciate the unbelievable timbre you get for the asking price.

 

  On the other hand the CKM70 tries to serve equal portions of everything. The dynamic range required for something like this to work well, is not often found in iems that can be had for less than 100$. While the CKM70 can't quite reach the seer amount of detail of treble oriented analytical phones like the re0 or the CK10, it manages to offer a very good compromise between analytical characteristics and good presence in the low end. It may not truly excel in one single area, but it manages to be very good in all areas together. It won't alienate a basshead like a re0, or an analytical listener like an ie8 or even a DDM.

 

  It's also carefully tuned to play well with everything you can throw at it. It's fast enough for speed/thrash metal and at the same time offers good enough decay for natural instruments. It sounds properly full when tonality and harmonics dictate it, without being too full for complex passages.

 

  Which one do I prefer? It's hard no to like the CKM70, it is an excellent all arounder, that performs very well across the whole frequency range. Still, most of the time I find myself using the Radius instead of the Audio Technica offering. I just can't get enough of their awesome timbre.

 

  Which one would I recommend? The CKM70 does everything right, plays by the book in both sound and fit, while offering an excellent build quality. It's the safest choice between the two, and an even better bargain than the DDM for its current asking price.


Edited by SkiesOfAzel - 10/17/10 at 11:44pm
post #2 of 28
Thread Starter 

 Here are some tracks used for comparison with links to youtube (i mostly used flacs).

 

  Electro :

 

  Chicane - Saltwater (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9u6jKV9TPLc

 

  The treble on the CKM70 is airier and more detailed. Instrument separation is also better as is the imaging. Soundstage is wider mainly to the better stereo separation. The prominence of the treble is another factor that helps that width to extend. The DDM produces a thicker, more organic sound that is pleasant but not as clean. Vocals though are better with the Radius, fuller, more detailed and emotional. Especially the part at 2.10 will literally drown you inside the words.

 

 

  Massive Attack – Angel (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaef2NgwqHY

 

  The CKM70 did very well here too, with impressive subbass, better cymbal reproduction and punchier bass. The DDM had a little too much bass but it still managed to pleasantly surprise me in other areas. It offered better instrument separation, more detail, especially in the lower mids and an amazing imaging, with sounds creeping from behind or above my head. Soundstage was also wider, and guitars and vocals were clearly more detailed and textured.

 

  Alternative/Rock:

 

  Katatonia – Evidence (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG6rMbnMktc

 

  I was very satisfied with the CKM70, it really did everything right, vocals guitars, drums, cymbals sounded very good. Then I switched to the DDM and OMG! If you want to showcase the tonal abilities of the DDM this is the song to use. The texture of the guitars is so detailed, that you can mentally follow every nook and cranny of their sound, which is full, with great natural decay and extension. The part at 1:05 almost blew me out of my chair. If you like this type of music you owe it to yourself to get a pair of these.

 

  Tool – Schism (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1YM476Pa4o

 

 

  This was closer. A little better cymbals on the CKM70, a little better guitars and vocals on the DDM. The psychedelic part around 3:30 was more enjoyable on the DDM thanks to an excellent decay and a bigger soundstage. Imaging was also crazy with sounds flying in from all directions.

 

  Fields Of The Nephilim – And There Will Your Heart Be Also (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP2vFSeDAaU

 

  An airy recording combined with the airy soundstage of the CKM70 produces an ethereal result. Presentation certainly goes to the CKM70 although there is some sibilance from time to time. The DDM sound is a little fuller and the vocals a little more detailed.

 

  Shoegaze:

 

  Arms & Sleepers – Kino (mp3 320kbps):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LucQTHULdBs

 

  The extra sparkle of the CKM70 really shines here. The more midcentric second half which is unfortunately missing from the youtube sample is a little better on the DDM as is the rendition of the accordion but the first part goes to the CKM70 hands down.

 

  Jazz:

 

Angelo Badalamenti - Fire Walk With Me (flac):

 

http://vimeo.com/11728287

 

  Le't try some jazz for a change. The lower end is more detailed and textured with the DDM. The double bass is very good with both but a little more prominent and natural with the DDM. The sax on the other hand, really benefits from the CKM70 better treble and the cymbals are wonderful, while the CKM70 does well enough on the lower end. Although the DDM doesn't lag far behind, i will give the win to the CKM70.

 

  Metal:

 

Alcest - Sur L'Ocean Couleur De Fer (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81piPtioDDQ

 

  Technically, the CKM70 did very well. I will go as far as to say that the acoustic guitars on the wonderful part from 4.54 and onwards sounded a little bit better with it. The DDM was a little better with the electric guitar, and the bass guitar was more prominent and easier to follow. The vocals were a little fuller and more forward too. Still the reason i will give the DDM this win, is that It was better at capturing and reproducing the raw emotion of this song.

 

Moonspell - From Lowering Skies (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVRfaTg6O-E

 

 I included this song especially for the drums. With the DDM they are prominent, maybe a tad too prominent but sound very natural. The shorter decay of the CKM70 down there, manages them well enough as they sound punchier, but still, i prefer the Radius natural sound. As usual, guitars sound better with the DDM, cymbals are better with the CKM70. On the plus side for the CKM70, its thiner sound works a little better for clarity in metal, although the difference with this particular track was very small.

 

Dark Tranquillity - Punish my Heaven (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKvS6gF12mE

 

  I chose this track to test speed, because it's one of the best/clearest recordings of death metal i've ever listened to. I really expected the DDM to lag behind in this, but it managed to reproduce the fast drums and guitars in a very coherent manner. It's also very good with brutal vocals in general, and guitars sounded a little better. The CKM70 on the other hand, benefited from a superior attack speed and treble, to reproduce a more fittingly aggressive sound. It also showcased a better dynamic range with a wider soundstage. The cymbals were excellent once more with the audio technica. A win for the CKM70, but not as wide as i was expecting, the DDM is faster than i initially thought. I will have to try a not so clean recording in order to find out how well the Radius with its thicker sound, manages to cope with fast metal.

 

Anathema - Shroud Of Frost (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dffMSufw5dc

 

  Doom Metal Pink Floyd style, listen to this patiently even if you are not in to metal (the second part is worth it). A recording were the cymbals are already recessed and the vocals are in your face followed closely by the guitars. Emotion in abundance by the DDM, airy presentation by the CKM70. Cymbal reproduction is suprisingly close. Guitars sound cleaner with the CKM70 and fuller with the DDM. Both phones do a very good job with this track.

 

Classical Music:

 

Ludwig van Beethoven - Adagio Sostenuto (Moonlight Sonata 1st part) (flac):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nT7_IZPHHb0

 

  I have a special relationship with this track. I first listened to it when i was 8 years old (i think it was featured on the Beauty and the Beast tv show) and immediately decided i had to learn how to play the piano, just to perform it. I managed to perform it live at the age of 15, and then i lost interest in the instrument . This is the track that fueled my love for music and it will always have a place in my heart, even though i rarely listen to classical music anymore.

  The DDM wins this easily. I know the notes and how the piano sounds like the back of my hand, and i don't think it gets much closer than this. The depth and volume of the notes, the decay, the texture, everything is as it should be. To be fair, the CKM70 does a good job on the piano, and someone without my background might not find it lacking to the DDM, but to me the difference is very noticeable.

 

I will probably add even more tracks as time goes by. If you have any requests don't hesitate to ask.


Edited by SkiesOfAzel - 9/28/10 at 10:39am
post #3 of 28

Very good review, thanks! I would like to put those in my ears anytime soon :p mainly the DDM, but I'm waiting for Radius to issue a new, better designed version ^^

post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 

 Lol better design??? I take it you haven't seen the TWF21R http://www.flickr.com/photos/feldu/4952638770/? What's next from those crazy bastards at Radius? Car sized iems?

post #5 of 28

I'm waiting for them to deisgn something that will fit most ears like conventional earphones..maybe the model afterwards :P

 

I still don't agree that they are that much more revealing than any other decent earphone :P I found them pretty forgiving in comparison to some other earphones that I have or have tried.

 

I think you got the DDM down pretty well. I think they are pretty polite overall and not just in the treble. I've never heard the CKM70 so no comment there but they never did get very popular here.

post #6 of 28

Thanks for the link! So these are the new Radius! I have to agree that they look...hmm, special!

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post

I'm waiting for them to deisgn something that will fit most ears like conventional earphones..maybe the model afterwards :P

 

I still don't agree that they are that much more revealing than any other decent earphone :P I found them pretty forgiving in comparison to some other earphones that I have or have tried.

 

  I think i have to explain the revealing part a little more. The mids have extremely detailed texture that sounds excellent from a good source. A not so good source tends to distort that detail, and my ear is so extremely sensitive to distortion, it can really drive me crazy. Not everyones ear is sensitive to the same freqs or sound patterns though, so if you find them forgiving, you are lucky . I also believe that texture smearing/distortion due to compression is the reason that some people have found their sound unrefined. Btw, the guy that reviewed these at mobile-review, agrees that there is an audible difference between compressed and uncompressed formats with the DDMs, and he has reviewed almost every high end iem under the sun.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post

 I've never heard the CKM70 so no comment there but they never did get very popular here.

 

  Yep, very few have them and it's a shame. I can understand why not many gambled on these back when they were sold for 180$, but now that they can be had for less than 100$ they are a real bargain. I hope more people do get them so that these can gather the attention they deserve.


Edited by SkiesOfAzel - 9/27/10 at 4:55pm
post #8 of 28

Great review Skies!

 

However, you're sorely tempting me to get those pair of CKM70's I've seen on sale. :( When you say tonality isn't quite as good as the DDM's, how close are we talking here? THe CKM70 interests me because its AT's highest end dynamic. If it can be a good middle ground between the DDM and the RE0, that would be fantastic...

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

 The CKM70 offers good tonality, don't worry about it. You might be able to get it cheaper if you search the Japanese stores. Some of them offer free shipping and others sell it for the unbelievably low price of 69$. 

post #10 of 28

Hmm I'll have to think long and hard about it this afternoon before I stab my wallet again. If I could find something that was like the CK90Pro with the timbre of the DDM and the airiness of the RE0... heh

 

On another note, that frequency response graph of the DDM is pretty surprising, particularly in the flatness of the bass curve. After looking at Etymotic research though, the frequency response graphs are starting to look to me more and more shaky as a way of telling how they will sound to the ear (they certainly don't sound like they have flat bass at times)- though they are still a good reference to compare different headphones with.

 

I'm like rawster in that I'm also surprised that you find the DDM that revealing, but I think I know what you mean. I think that while its very good at picking out things like the quality of the microphone used, or the quality of the mastering. But they certainly don't pick out artefact detail or hiss like the CK90Pro or even the Ety MC5 does. If you ever get a chance to listen to the CK90Pro, you'll know what I mean - those little balanced armatures can be viciously technical on independent artists with cheaper production.

post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Hmm I'll have to think long and hard about it this afternoon before I stab my wallet again. If I could find something that was like the CK90Pro with the timbre of the DDM and the airiness of the RE0... heh

 


  I know what you mean about stabbing your wallet. Amazon.jp has them for 75$ with free shipping which is more of a nick than a stab :

 http://www.amazon.co.jp/%E3%82%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3%E3%82%AA%E3%83%86%E3%82%AF%E3%83%8B%E3%82%AB-ATH-CKM70-audio-technica-%E3%83%80%E3%82%A4%E3%83%8A%E3%83%9F%E3%83%83%E3%82%AF%E5%9E%8B%E3%82%A4%E3%83%B3%E3%83%8A%E3%83%BC%E3%82%A4%E3%83%A4%E3%83%BC%E3%83%98%E3%83%83%E3%83%89%E3%83%9B%E3%83%B3/dp/B001BXYBPU%3FSubscriptionId%3D0571BBGTQZ5YYPEDSY02%26tag%3Dkakaku-ce-22%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3DB001BXYBPU%26me%3dAN1VRQENFRJN5

 

[EDIT]

Lol, they just went out of stock, you are unlucky.

 

  As for their sound signature, well, they do have some analytical qualities like the re0, with them being relatively flat and neutral, but they almost surely offer a greater dynamic range as they reach lower than the re0 (although the freq range spec from audio technica is a joke). Their bass also helps them sound natural, so the timbre will probably be better as well. Their soundstage is very airy and has an out of the head feeling to it, imaging might be more accurate with the re0, but i am just guessing on that last part.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

On another note, that frequency response graph of the DDM is pretty surprising, particularly in the flatness of the bass curve. After looking at Etymotic research though, the frequency response graphs are starting to look to me more and more shaky as a way of telling how they will sound to the ear (they certainly don't sound like they have flat bass at times)- though they are still a good reference to compare different headphones with.

 

  A frequency response graph certainly won't tell you how an earphone will sound to you, everyones hearing is a little different. Besides, with iems you have to factor angle and depth of insertion to the ear, tips used etc. Thus the graph is a more objective way to measure performance than my ear, so i decided to include it for those that care for the technical characteristics of the DDM.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

I'm like rawster in that I'm also surprised that you find the DDM that revealing, but I think I know what you mean. I think that while its very good at picking out things like the quality of the microphone used, or the quality of the mastering. But they certainly don't pick out artefact detail or hiss like the CK90Pro or even the Ety MC5 does. If you ever get a chance to listen to the CK90Pro, you'll know what I mean - those little balanced armatures can be viciously technical on independent artists with cheaper production.

 


  I will have to look further into it then, as i 'd hate to misinform anyone who reads this review. I have access to some Beyerdynamics monitoring cans, so i will make some more tests and update with the results. My experience with balanced armatures is limited to the pl50, the er6 and the sf 5 pro, and i don't have access to any of them anymore to use for testing.

 

  Btw, i didn't mean that the DDMs are transparent in the conventional sense, as you imply in your post, i meant to say that they tend to distort complex sounds (especially in the mids) with badly compressed tracks. Every phone does that of course, but the DDM offers average resolution, so the distortion is smeared over other frequencies. The CKM70 has a good resolution, and the distortion doesn't invade other frequencies, so it's less annoying/noticable.


Edited by SkiesOfAzel - 9/28/10 at 6:24am
post #12 of 28

Nice comparison Skies!  I see you have been enjoying your DDMs, haven't you? I am actually glad I took a chance and told you about them. After all, you have made some nice posts/comments thereby offering great insight of the DDM world. I might be looking into new Radius and perhaps I can write a review/comparison here Abing 11 and 21 models when ever available. 

post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 

  To tell you the truth, the CKM70 was almost exactly what i was looking for in an iem when i came here to ask for advice, flat, balanced, reasonable bass, good detail without being harsh and very good resolution. In one word (okay, maybe two ) an all arounder. Still, i am glad i took your advice and got the DDM, it might not be exactly what i had in mind, but it managed to exceed some of my expectations in the long run.

 

  The TWF21R already sounds more to my liking, less bass, more treble, bigger soundstage and even better mids. If they manage to increase the dynamic range and resolution with the new model, i will get them even if i have to use superglue to secure them in my ears.

post #14 of 28

Wait, so is that what the new model DDMs coming out this year will look like?! Nooooo! They're even bigger than the current ones...

 

I've been meaning to get these since I first read about them. Given what the 'improved' ones will look like, do you recommend getting the current version? Is the new design confirmed?

 

Great review btw!

post #15 of 28

I recommend get the old ones and when new model will come in December, get a new one as well and sell which ever is your least preferred. That is what I will do 

 

 

HP-TWF21.jpg
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by showa60 View Post

Wait, so is that what the new model DDMs coming out this year will look like?! Nooooo! They're even bigger than the current ones...

 

I've been meaning to get these since I first read about them. Given what the 'improved' ones will look like, do you recommend getting the current version? Is the new design confirmed?

 

Great review btw!

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