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Re-Discovering Vinyl......and learning a few things! - Page 2

post #16 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuberoller
My son,

you must learn to use the turntable as a tool of foreplay. The typical vinyl side is 22 minutes. That should give you just enough time to come up for air and switch sides. The next 22 minutes should be enough for you to get the favor returned and THEN you put on the CD changer with a few hours of love grooves in the slots. Have you ever seen the relections a spinning record makes in a candle-lit room? My wife thinks that is just too sexy and it gets her goin' every time. Chicks dig vinyl and if you get good at it,you can use it to your advantage.


Will have to remember that
post #17 of 67
My grandfather has a turntable (have no idea what brand; haven't bothered checking, as I haven't used it all too much), and I quite enjoy listening to it. There is something distinctly different and satisfying about plopping that big disc on and watching it spin. Plus, Pink Floyd sounds even cooler in vinyl than on CD

As for Tuberoller's usage of vinyl, erm, never really thought of it that way... but I suppose you're right. There is something soothing/sexy about watching a record slowly meander it's way around...

(-:Stephonovich:-)
post #18 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuberoller
Chicks dig vinyl and if you get good at it,you can use it to your advantage.

Good lord, Gilberto/Getz on wax is like having a Genie in a bottle...
post #19 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by minya
I have to disagree. Maybe it's an age thing, but digital definitely sounds far superior to me.

- Chris
Chris, are you basing that judgement on listening to your Tech 12 or have you heard better rigs?
post #20 of 67
Chicks generally like to take things slow....33 1/3 RPM is better than 300 - 500 RPM in this case.

Quote:
THEN you put on the CD changer with a few hours of love grooves in the slots.
You can always get a record changer
post #21 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by Ohoen
Chris, are you basing that judgement on listening to your Tech 12 or have you heard better rigs?
Nope, I haven't heard any high-end vinyl rigs. Then again, I wouldn't call my digital rig all that great, either.

But I prefer gobs of detail and neutrality - something digital does better. There's also no comparison for convenience. Even if a high-end vinyl rig did blow me away, I couldn't handle all the god-damn variables: tone-arm, cartridge, platter, cartridge weight, vertical tracking force, needle replacement... blah. That said, I'm condemned to use vinyl because a good amount of music I listen to is released on vinyl exclusively.

(And by "use," I mean "play once to record onto my computer, after which I play its digital facsimile and never touch the original record again." Take that, you analog-o-philes. )

(AND since I buy almost all of my music through mailorder outlets [most of it is nigh-impossible to find in record stores] -- vinyl is quite expensive to ship. Especially overseas. Score another one for digital. )

(Edit part three: Just want to make it clear that I'm not in any way trying to proselytize or knock anyone else's opinions. Merely offering a difference of opinion.)
- Chris
post #22 of 67
hi trawlerman. I need to ask you a TD-150 question.

I opened up my motor which was lacking torque and I gathered all pieces inside. I put them back in the correct order and I put it together. I plugged it in my Vintage kenwood receiver and i noticed the following differences with my Kenwood semi automatic TT. The sound from the needle scratching like a pencil between the tracks where there is no sound is much louder on the Thorens. Could that be because on the Kenwood I got a 200 EURO cart (which i bought orriginally for the TD-150 before it broke)and on the Thorens currently there is a 30 EURO and heavily used cart?

Also I noticed that when I wipe the record with the soft hair brush on the kenwood the platter slows down because of the friction if i apply the pressure i think its normal for cleaing. On the thorens I can even make it stop. The motor is not so strong I guess from its nature. Do u remember? Anyway it still spins up the record to perfect speed! Im glad i brought it back to life. Still has some work to be done though and finally put the Stanton 881 . Cant wait!

Get a TD-150 quick. Its small slim and its sweet! And also its very cheap. But make sure to get a TD-150MKII because MKI is lacking in tonearm terms.

Im glad my mother bought that in the early 70s. And it wasnt heavily used so condition is excellent!

I will stop trashing your post now and ask if theres a significant difference between SACD and vinyl. Is it worth going vinyl if dont count the cheap and many records you can get. If the prices for the records were the same and you took out the collectibility factor are things almost the same. Do SACD and vinyl sound the same? Or pretty much the same? Why should one invest a minimum of $700 for a good TT/cart/phono stage combo instead of grabbing for half the money or for the same money a good Sony SACD?
post #23 of 67
Well, there is much more stuff out on vinyl than SACD, and more stuff continues to be released on vinyl than on SACD. Strange but true. That said, it is either mostly indie stuff, classical or audiophile reissues....indie and dance/electronica/house/rap etc. stuff making up most of it. I heard a Sota vaccuum turntable and an SCD XA777ES in the same ~20-30,000 dollar system, and I preferred the vinyl for the same recording. This was 2 channel. But let me be frank, the SACD was fantastic. If the catalogs were not an issue, SACD would probably take it for convenience, even though it is far less convenient than CD (no copying, no portability etc). That said, the vinyl catalog is far superior, especially if you like classical music or indie music...and you can't beat a turntable for feeling like you are a part of the process of making the music -- the ritual aspect of it.
post #24 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by stuartr
more stuff continues to be released on vinyl than on CD. Strange but true.
What??? This does not jive at all with my experience.
post #25 of 67
In one of the more recent stereophiles, it put the new vinyl market far ahead of the new SACD market. For most of the independent labels I listen to (Thrill Jockey, Matador, Drag City...), almost every release is available on vinyl and cd -- not SACD. Every major radiohead album is available on vinyl, with none on SACD. A bunch of modern classical is on SACD, but as far as I am concerned, most of the performances are *****. I would rather listen to Dorati, Mravinsky or Ormandy for the large performances, and soloists like Casals, Rostropovich, Oistrakh, Heifetz, Starker, Richter, Horowitz and so forth -- very little of this is available on SACD (nor modern vinyl for that matter). Anyway, that's just my experience.
post #26 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by stuartr
In one of the more recent stereophiles, it put the new vinyl market far ahead of the new SACD market. For most of the independent labels I listen to (Thrill Jockey, Matador, Drag City...), almost every release is available on vinyl and cd -- not SACD. Every major radiohead album is available on vinyl, with none on SACD. A bunch of modern classical is on SACD, but as far as I am concerned, most of the performances are *****. I would rather listen to Dorati, Mravinsky or Ormandy for the large performances, and soloists like Casals, Rostropovich, Oistrakh, Heifetz, Starker, Richter, Horowitz and so forth -- very little of this is available on SACD (nor modern vinyl for that matter). Anyway, that's just my experience.
That is more plausible. Saying new vinyl exceeds new CDs, though, strains credulity.
post #27 of 67
Wow, I said CD's? That is retarded of course. I meant SACD's. Sorry.
post #28 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Even if a high-end vinyl rig did blow me away, I couldn't handle all the god-damn variables: tone-arm, cartridge, platter, cartridge weight, vertical tracking force, needle replacement... blah.
But minya, that's what makes it fun........more things to spend money on, too!
post #29 of 67
I was thumbing through my weekly planner and it had a page of interesting stats for the last 20 or so years. Does anyone care to guess what year it was that worldwide CD sales exceeded vinyl record sales? I'll give you a hint. It was after 1983. CDs were not widely available until after that year.
post #30 of 67
Thread Starter 
1988.
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