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SR60-Mod - Page 210  

post #3136 of 5003

Bravo! @ lawrywild. I love the brushed look that you gave em.

post #3137 of 5003
You mean the XM6?

You can calculate what it will do if you know the impedance curve.
post #3138 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by abcray View Post

Hi friends.

I always wanted to add more bass to my SR 225i cans.

Last night I opened up  those and popped the ten venting holes of each. I was too agressive and should have done only to four of those. Now the sound is too bassy, muddy  with loss of details. Is it what is called "canny" resonance? 

I regret for what I did and I wish I could fix it. What about dumping the back of the drivers and inside of the cups with Dynamat or adhesive felt? What if I found a thin layer of paper similar to those that had been  popped and glued over  the holes? What if I changed the L-cushions to the G-cushions, the sound would be softer, less bassy?  Has anyone ever done it? I´m desperate. Please help me. Thanks.


Don't use sticky felt - just buy a sheet of regular felt from Michael's - or another craft store for about $.30 cents.  Cut a circle to fit around the rear driver magnet and over the holes.  You can use a few small dabs of glue between the 10 holes that you opened up.  This should change the sound in an appreciable way.  I actually have a pair of SR225 headphones that Bill once modified and that's how he performed the mod.  Additionally, the sides of the plastic cup for the rear part of the drive were also lined in felt.

 

Good luck to you.  If you do think task, I'm sure you'll be more than pleased with what you'll begin to hear again.

 

Edit: Don't even think of covering any of those holes that you punched open with some Dynamat.  It will make the driver vibrate and rattle with distortion - something,  you really don't want to do.


Edited by wje - 4/18/11 at 5:56pm
post #3139 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclein View Post



abcray-I think if you now cover each hole with Dynamat you can reverse your errant hole punching.

             I personally haven't done it so somebody chime in to help our friend here...you just cover up the holes...
 

 


Noooooooooo.  Don't cover any of those holes with Dynamat.  I have first-hand experience with this.  If Dynamat is in place, it will block the sound and the driver will be restricted from moving the necessary air that it can.  The end result will be a driver that will be vibrating horribly and sound like you've blown the driver.  This isn't a good path to take.  Felt should be utilized as I described above.  Just plain felt - with a few drops of glue carefully placed in strategic locations to keep it in place.

 

post #3140 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

You mean the XM6?

You can calculate what it will do if you know the impedance curve.


Yeah, that's what I meant :)

post #3141 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

You mean the XM6?

You can calculate what it will do if you know the impedance curve.


 

That's a whole lot of overkill when a 10 cent resistor will do the same thing, but still kind of a cool feature nonetheless.


Edited by unchain - 4/18/11 at 6:30pm
post #3142 of 5003
Thread Starter 

Here is an HF2 version of an SR325.  Working out the logistics took me a while (with the freaking hole saw) and drove me a little nuts, but I wanted to put it up here.  I'm in the process of sending some version of this to different people.  I appreciate the patience of all who waited for me to get the specs right.  We just went through FCAT testing, and time has been a real "unobtainium" down here in downtown Pandora.

 

Special thanks to Shwallman who lent me his HF2 shell to give me a sense of perspective.  John, your graciousness will never be forgotten.

 

finished3.jpg

 

I finally found the right fit for the driver cage, which is great for partial liberation.  It's not so tight that it would stay in if you turned it upside down (a little adhesive or screws would come in handy) but it's pretty snug in the cavity and pretty flush with the face.

 

finished1.jpg

Driver Flush.jpg

post #3143 of 5003

Quote:

Originally Posted by JamesMcProgger 

OK guys, help me with my wood (pun intented indeed)

I need to decide wood for my future cups.

wood2.jpgwood1.jpg

 

 I put up those guides Progger, unfortunately I didnt bookmark them, but I'm pretty sure I linked the source when I put them up. Also I dont know squat about wood, the tonal properties of any particular wood like velocity of sound or internal dampening qualities etc. I dont even know how accurate those charts as guides are. The Cocobolo for instance seems to trend toward being a wood that supposedly resonates more bass in the one chart and trends toward being not as bass centric and more favoring the higher frequencies on the other. Before I dismantled the pair I put together with Cocobolo I'd say the chart that plots it on the brighter side is more accurate.

Eclein just switched out his Cocobolo cups for some made out of Limba, which is not either chart but it seemed like from his impressions that he preferred the Limba cups to the Cocobolo ones. I looked up Limba after he posted his impressions because I was curious and found this.

Limba (a.k.a. Korina)

Back in the fifties, Gibson® introduced a couple of space age looking guitars: the Flying V, and the Explorer.  Both were made from white limba, which for some reason Gibson referred to instead as Korina (maybe limba didn’t sound sexy enough).  Guitarists might drool at the mention of guitars made from Korina, but if you go to a lumberyard and ask for Korina, most managers will respond with a blank stare, followed by a comment like “Never heard of it….” Limba comes from Africa, and is somewhat difficult to come by here in the states (again, Limba is not the same thing as African mahogany).  It produces a beautiful, warm rich tone, similar to mahogany, but with maybe just a touch more resonance.  It’s my personal favorite for guitar bodies and necks.  The tone is great and it’s  lightweight. Limba is usually classified as either black limba or white limba, depending on the coloration of the grain.  Black limba looks much more interesting, is slightly more lightweight, and is easier to find for sale; while white limba is the traditional choice.  The distinction between the two is not a matter of different species, like the difference between Philippine and Honduran mahogany.  It’s simply the difference in grain pattern caused by mineral deposits. Black Limba is generally from older trees.  I’ve heard opposing opinions as to which sounds better, but in a blind tone test, I doubt anyone could recognize any difference. 

As far as I know both RS models use mahogany and probably the GS model as well. So it would seem that Grado based on the charts is using a wood that is mid centric and more of a textured tone than a pure tone. That's just my opinion based on my reading of the charts. Which again were meant as a guide, food for thought if you will. I finally bought some wood not to long ago that I dropped off at a wood shop to be lathed. I went with African Blackwood for a couple of reasons; first I thought they would look awesome, and second I thought they would sound awesome. One of the thoughts I read researching wood was, the Blackwood was to Brazilian Rosewood as Brazilian Rosewood was to Indian Rosewood. Which on the one hand was just someone saying he thought the Blackwood's tonal properties were superior to Brazilian Rosewood (which is generally considered the best). OTOH sound and tone are all sort of subjective, but my general sense was it's good stuff and they should look awesome.

The other wood that I think would make great cups is the Ovangkol. It seems to be very mid centric like Mahogany according to the one chart but also resonates better on both ends, leading me to think it's more balanced than Mahogany but again that is just my perception. 

post #3144 of 5003

"Koa

Koa is similar in tone to mahogany, but has a slightly brighter attack.  It has been a favorite among bass players for some time, and is one of the best tonewoods for guitar as well.  Curly Koa is particularly beautiful, though fairly rare.  Unfortunately, the supply of Koa, which grows only in Hawaii, has dwindled to near extinction.  Consequently, there is now a ban on harvesting any new trees.  As a result, suitable Koa lumber is difficult to obtain, and usually far too expensive."

 

There goes my recommendation...

post #3145 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

Here is an HF2 version of an SR325.  Working out the logistics took me a while (with the freaking hole saw) and drove me a little nuts, but I wanted to put it up here.  I'm in the process of sending some version of this to different people.  I appreciate the patience of all who waited for me to get the specs right.  We just went through FCAT testing, and time has been a real "unobtainium" down here in downtown Pandora.

 

Special thanks to Shwallman who lent me his HF2 shell to give me a sense of perspective.  John, your graciousness will never be forgotten.

 

finished3.jpg

 

I finally found the right fit for the driver cage, which is great for partial liberation.  It's not so tight that it would stay in if you turned it upside down (a little adhesive or screws would come in handy) but it's pretty snug in the cavity and pretty flush with the face.

 

finished1.jpg

Driver Flush.jpg


Bill, what size saw is the one the driver (w/ cage) fits? Is it actually a 46mm saw? Seems to be what I'm measuring here for the diameter of it. I can't find a saw in that size anywhere though, so just wanting to confirm that.

And if you don't mind, what are your other commonly used ones? I've got to order some saws and just want to know what you're using.
post #3146 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by unchain View Post




 

That's a whole lot of overkill when a 10 cent resistor will do the same thing, but still kind of a cool feature nonetheless.


The XM5 has it too. Of course, this being head-fi, everyone needs a portable amp anyway. You might as well get the one with all the cool options.
post #3147 of 5003

Thanks a lot guys,

I'll cover the holes gluing a with a thin felt on them, as a semi-permeable membrane. I think of letting two to four holes uncovered. I'll also stick Dynamat on the the back of the driver. I accept suggestions about the number of the holes I should leave regarding the use of l-cushions.

post #3148 of 5003



I like 4 holes. But i did it to a pair of 325s awhile ago and did all of them. They sounded nice aswell. Start off one at a time and see for yourself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by abcray View Post

Thanks a lot guys,

I'll cover the holes gluing a with a thin felt on them, as a semi-permeable membrane. I think of letting two to four holes uncovered. I'll also stick Dynamat on the the back of the driver. I accept suggestions about the number of the holes I should leave regarding the use of l-cushions.



 

post #3149 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by abcray View Post

Thanks a lot guys,

I'll cover the holes gluing a with a thin felt on them, as a semi-permeable membrane. I think of letting two to four holes uncovered. I'll also stick Dynamat on the the back of the driver. I accept suggestions about the number of the holes I should leave regarding the use of l-cushions.



it's all personal preference mate :)

post #3150 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by abcray View Post

Thanks a lot guys,

I'll cover the holes gluing a with a thin felt on them, as a semi-permeable membrane. I think of letting two to four holes uncovered. I'll also stick Dynamat on the the back of the driver. I accept suggestions about the number of the holes I should leave regarding the use of l-cushions.


I'd say it is a combination of preference and how bowls fit your ears. The sit on some, while fitting around others. If they are around yours, it's probably similar to a comfy in distance, where if they're on your ear, it will add distance and reduce bass, warranting more bass.

I'm still at a big fat 0 on mine. Now that I actually hear a solution that makes sense if I want to go backwards, I'm willing to punch some holes. Still wanting to go all out with wood first. Seems like it would benefit more from a wooden shell than more rattling plastic.
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