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SR60-Mod - Page 200  

post #2986 of 5003

I NEED DYNAMAT. Got my sr80i's today.. promptly took off the loin cloth, opened them up, poked 4 holes and replaced the screen with my own silver mesh.. I'm getting a bit of midbass bloat though, I think a little dynamat would do wonders. I'll post all the pics I took soon. Phase 1 complete.

 

Phase 2 - Dynamat and recable.

 

Phase 3 - WOOD

post #2987 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by unchain View Post

...anyone with soldering related questions, I can answer them, just shoot me a message!


Home Depot sells a 25 watt Weller, I think that's the one I'm going to get. My first try at soldering is going to be a practice run recabling my Porta Pro's. What would be easier for a novice...desoldering with some desoldering wick or using one of those pumps?

 

And what kind of solder should I use. For the task and my skill level is there a certain type and guage that I should get?

 

post #2988 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislangley4253 View Post

I NEED DYNAMAT. Got my sr80i's today.. promptly took off the loin cloth, opened them up, poked 4 holes and replaced the screen with my own silver mesh.. I'm getting a bit of midbass bloat though, I think a little dynamat would do wonders. I'll post all the pics I took soon. Phase 1 complete.

 

Phase 2 - Dynamat and recable.

 

Phase 3 - WOOD


You just want the Dynamat to cover the rear of the magnet, right?  Keep in mind, the magnet has 2 holes on the back that are about 1/32" in size and go all the way through the magnet to the front of the driver.  You can carefully mold the Dynamat around those holes (keeping them open) and you should be good to go.  My local audio dealer sold me 2 pieces (each about the size of a license plate) for $15.00 this past weekend.  Actually, the product I got is not the original Dynamat, but the same, or similar stuff made by Stinger.

 

PM me with your addy information and I'll cut off a square and drop it in the mail for you.

 

 

post #2989 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by wje View Post




You just want the Dynamat to cover the rear of the magnet, right?  Keep in mind, the magnet has 2 holes on the back that are about 1/32" in size and go all the way through the magnet to the front of the driver.  You can carefully mold the Dynamat around those holes (keeping them open) and you should be good to go.  My local audio dealer sold me 2 pieces (each about the size of a license plate) for $15.00 this past weekend.  Actually, the product I got is not the original Dynamat, but the same, or similar stuff made by Stinger.

 

PM me with your addy information and I'll cut off a square and drop it in the mail for you.

 

 



I think bilavideo might have some in the mail for me already :) I'll let you know otherwise though. I'll upload those pics as promised now.

post #2990 of 5003

I have that weller, honestly I don't think I would buy it again given the chance, definitely gets super hot. However like I pointed out earlier I managed to replace an opamp on a Xonar DX without melting the board, it's all about control and luck :D

post #2991 of 5003

GEDC0588.JPG

 

removing the driver cloth

GEDC0598.JPG

 

freeing the shells / removing the stock grills & buttons

GEDC0604.JPG

poking a few holes (i couldn't wait for the dynamat)

 

GEDC0591.JPG

GEDC0606.JPG

 

post #2992 of 5003

I also went overboard when buying the Dynamat Extreme. The more you buy, the cheaper it is per square foot, and I couldn't resist:)

 

So, if anyone needs some PM me and I'll send you some for the cost of postage.

post #2993 of 5003

Chris,

 

Things are looking good with your mods - they're coming along nicely.  After some experience with the "bowl" ear pads on my 225s and 325s, I've started to take care of them a bit better so, hopefully, they don't wear out as quick.  About once a month, I fill up the sink with a bit of warm water and some mild detergent.  I dip the pads in the soapy water and let them soak a bit and then squeeze out all of the soap.  I then have to rinse them a few times with clear water and lay them out on a paper towel to dry overnight.  Hopefully, by keeping them cleaner, they remain comfortable and last a bit longer.  Then again, $20 for a new pair isn't so steep for a price either.

post #2994 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post




Home Depot sells a 25 watt Weller, I think that's the one I'm going to get. My first try at soldering is going to be a practice run recabling my Porta Pro's. What would be easier for a novice...desoldering with some desoldering wick or using one of those pumps?

 

And what kind of solder should I use. For the task and my skill level is there a certain type and guage that I should get?

 


I've always been happy using even a cheap suction pump... I've heard some folks really prefer the wick. I'd guess that whatever your learn with will be fine, just practice it a few times you know how the solder reacts.

I'd suggest 22 swg solder to start.
post #2995 of 5003

That means I have to take them off of my ears. We might have an issue there. Thanks for the advice. :) i bought them from a guy who used them for a year without washing them. They could use the washing for sure.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wje View Post

Chris,

 

Things are looking good with your mods - they're coming along nicely.  After some experience with the "bowl" ear pads on my 225s and 325s, I've started to take care of them a bit better so, hopefully, they don't wear out as quick.  About once a month, I fill up the sink with a bit of warm water and some mild detergent.  I dip the pads in the soapy water and let them soak a bit and then squeeze out all of the soap.  I then have to rinse them a few times with clear water and lay them out on a paper towel to dry overnight.  Hopefully, by keeping them cleaner, they remain comfortable and last a bit longer.  Then again, $20 for a new pair isn't so steep for a price either.



 

post #2996 of 5003
post #2997 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danthrax View Post

http://www.amazon.com/Dynamat-10425-Xtreme-Wedge-Sheet/dp/B00020CAVA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1302743919&sr=8-3 <-- good value you get a lot of dynamat.


Yeah, that's a lot of Dynamat - 4 sq. feet.  That should suffice for about 200 headphone modifications.  darthsmile.gif

 

post #2998 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post

 

Home Depot sells a 25 watt Weller, I think that's the one I'm going to get. My first try at soldering is going to be a practice run recabling my Porta Pro's. What would be easier for a novice...desoldering with some desoldering wick or using one of those pumps?

 

And what kind of solder should I use. For the task and my skill level is there a certain type and guage that I should get?

I can't vouch for it, Weller usually makes a good product. I'd say 25 watts is a bit overkill for this. I really recommend getting an adjustable temperature station. If not, go 15 watts.

 

To start, I usually recommend using 60/40 lead solder. It melts well, flows well, it's cheap. It's not RoHS compliant, but it works really well. I usually use around .031 in diameter for most things, smaller for very compact circuts, etc.

 

Go with the wick, but get decent quality wick (not Radioshack) or it will be harder. They're both cheap, so if you plan on soldering more, get both. They both have their uses, but I use solder wick 90% of the time.
 

 

post #2999 of 5003
Thread Starter 

Tonight, while playing catch-up, I had a breakthrough.  I've replaced the "grip" (upper and lower contact surfaces) with a thicker lip and a ring that stops the inner where I want it.  This design squeezes the inner tight but has more durability.  

 

I've had instances where somebody left some glue on the inner, then tried to force the inner into the groove, rubbing against the inner walls until they cracked.  I've also had instances where those little plastic bumps, deep inside the inner, managed to exert undue pressure.  Somebody in a bit of a hurry would just force the issue, only to get an agonizing crack (As with replacing a tire on your car, putting the thing on straight makes a difference).  It's an aggravation that needed to be dealt with.  Unfortunately, when you get down to tolerance of one-eighth of an inch, there's a fragility that makes the classic design less than user-friendly.  On a completed headphone, where all the parts have been assembled in the factory, these fragility issues don't come up but when you hand a shell, or an inner, to someone else, you have to ask yourself whether we're dealing with a "customer serviceable" part.  

 

I, personally, prefer thicker shells, regardless of what they do in Brooklyn.  Trying to make my ideas fit their tolerances has been a bit of a headache, but I think I've found a way through the labyrinth.  I'll follow up with some pics.  In short, I've thickened the outer lip, removed the inner lip and replaced its "grip" with a tighter fit from a thicker lip.  I've also created a ring that stops the inner exactly where I want it.  I can now check the fit before I've left the drill press.  Creating the "cradle" is now one of the earliest steps in the process.


Edited by Bilavideo - 4/13/11 at 7:08pm
post #3000 of 5003

prototype-shell.jpg

 

This way the driver is easily accessible/removable and no messing with flimsy shell walls. The locking mechanism can even be another wood ring with a small tack to hold it in place.

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