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SR60-Mod - Page 199  

post #2971 of 5003

good? or bad? kinda hard to tell from what you said.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hi-fiber View Post

oh i went all wood on my grado...

 

IMG_0628.JPG

 

the sound? well at first i was puzzled... i thought theres an imbalance but i realized that the instruments get localized to certain spots... like i cant point exactly where certain instruments are.



 

post #2972 of 5003

 

oh sorry, im having a hard time with english.

 

at first i was quite disturbed at the "imbalance" but i realized sooner that the instruments "fall" itno their respective spots. it doesnt sound too forward now. 

superb high frequency extension and vocals get this "air", and sometimes maybe too much [especially with female vocals] but its better than the plastic/wood combination.

 

basically it sounds more clean and refined without sacrificing the slam.

 

i love how they sound now! hahaha thats the bottom point! ill try better wood than mahogany next time. and maybe an aluminum sleeves.

post #2973 of 5003

40w is too much for this job IMO. You don't want to overheat and loosen the voice coil wire underneath. 15w or 18w is more than enough, if it doesn't heat up fast enough you didn't tin the tip properly because it melts almost instantly for me.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wje View Post



 

1) You can get a 40-watt model.  Usually. Home-Depot or Lowes sells a 40-watt Weller soldering iron, a small roll of solder and a tool to work with to hold your wire in place while performing the work.  The cost should be around $15.00.  15-watt models are available as well as 25-watt, I believe from Radio Shack. However, those models seemed to take too long to melt the solder for my impatient self.

 

 



 

post #2974 of 5003

i would agree that 40W is too much... i felt that my 30W was already too much. but of course, with a steady hand, you can make it work.

 

i was tempted to pull the wire so that i wont overheat the thin voice-coil wire. but i backed up i might tear the voice coil by any sudden movements.


Edited by hi-fiber - 4/13/11 at 3:20am
post #2975 of 5003
Quote:

Originally Posted by RLembke View Post
 

My question - does anyone have excess headband/rod/gimbal parts lying around that I could buy from you?  Since it looks like I'll be replacing most of the stock SR60s, it doesn't sound like the best investment to buy all those parts I'm just going to replace.


Anyone have any thoughts on headbands parts?  Anyone have any laying around gathering dust?

 

Rob

post #2976 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by RLembke View Post




Anyone have any thoughts on headbands parts?  Anyone have any laying around gathering dust?

 

Rob

 

have you thought about buying one of those cheap-n-nasty lo-fi headphones? the sturdy iron used for headbands in gradoes seem to be quite rare. i havent read your earlier posts, what happened to your SR60 anyway?
 

 

post #2977 of 5003

I've got a set of iGrados that have a cable shorting out.  While searching around for recable wire suggestions, I found this thread.  Now I'd like to try and turn these drivers into a set of BilaGrados.  Since cable, cups and headband pads are all easy to recreate or find, the only parts I lack are the gimbals, and "L"-metal band-"R" strap.  

 

Worst case, I will just buy a new set of SR60s and offer up my extra drivers to anyone that needs to replace one or someone that wants a set of drivers that are easily liberated.

post #2978 of 5003


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lawrywild View Post

When I modded my Alessandro cups I just bought stainless steel mesh. Can't remember the specs, but I definitely got something with a high open area, like 70%+. Something like 0.7mm woven wire with 1.5mm holes. It's pretty much identical to the 225/325 mesh except with thinner wire so that I could cut with scissors, which also meant it was more open too.

 

400

 

edit: found specs:

 

Mesh Count: #10 mesh - 10 wires or holes per linear inch.
Wire Diameter: 0.56mm
Aperture: 1.98mm - this is the hole size and it is square
Open Area %: 60.8%

 

http://www.themeshcompany.com/acatalog/Stainless_Steel_A5_Sized_Sheets.html


That's something similar to what I did.

 

post #2979 of 5003

Eh 40 is too much? I blew out my driver once with a 60 but otherwise I've been pretty alright with my 60W... have I been doing something wrong?

 

post #2980 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawrywild View Post

40w is too much for this job IMO. You don't want to overheat and loosen the voice coil wire underneath. 15w or 18w is more than enough, if it doesn't heat up fast enough you didn't tin the tip properly because it melts almost instantly for me.
 



 

 

 

I agree 100%.

 

 

I use a Hakko 15w.  It's a fantastic iron for pretty much everything I do.

112CRbNyijL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
 

 


Edited by cswann1 - 4/13/11 at 9:39am
post #2981 of 5003


It's not right or wrong... it's just a recomendation.  An experienced hand might be capable of using 60W (or more) using good technique to prevent overheating.  Using a lower power iron will take a little longer, but that time makes it more forgiving before you start doing damage.  Big powerful irons are tradtionally used for larger joints, while smaller irons (15-30W or so) are more typical in electrical work.

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nightslayer View Post

Eh 40 is too much? I blew out my driver once with a 60 but otherwise I've been pretty alright with my 60W... have I been doing something wrong?

 



 

 

post #2982 of 5003
Guys, if you plan on using your soldering iron more than once or twice, please do not use Radioshack or Wal-Mart soldering irons. The stands they come with, the lack of a power switch, they're just totally unsafe. Not to mention, without a temperature adjustment knob (or at least a knob controlling the power flow to the iron), the temperature the tip is at is often wildly inappropriate for the job you're working on.

If you want to get yourself a decent, inexpensive, well made soldering station that has a knob to control the electrical flow (exact temperature, tip feedback stations will run you at least $100 or so), check out the Weller WLC100. It was my first station when I was 13 and I still have it and it still works wonderfully and costs around $45. I use a fairly expensive temperature feedback Hakko station because I work with delicate components and need to know exactly how hot my iron is. They are a great investment if you plan to solder a lot.

40 watts is OVERKILL. Unless you are very, very quick, you will stand a good chance of damaging components. Don't risk it. The 15 watt Hakko would probably be ok if you really, really don't want to spend a couple more bucks and get a nice station. Just be careful where you set it and make sure you unplug it after use.

I'm a computer engineering/embedded componants programmer and I've been soldering circut boards since I was 10 anyone with soldering related questions, I can answer them, just shoot me a message!
post #2983 of 5003

200 pages. congrats kids. None of us have lives haha

post #2984 of 5003
post #2985 of 5003

Wow...200 pages on mods you can do to Grado headphones, I think we should point out that the Grado cans made this possible. If you think about it we take whatever Grado model we can afford and then have the option to make them sound the way we want them to, fit on our heads they way we want them to, and even how they cover or don't cover our ears. 

 

And how about our fearless leader who started out making little videos about how to mod our Grados then made Coccobolo shells for everybody who asked him about them, now he's got the process more and more refined and still holds down a full time job and is a Father and Grandfather to boot...how about that BILAVIDEO guy huh!!!!!

 

Hats off to ya buddy--Thanks BILL!!!!!

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