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SR60-Mod - Page 150  

post #2236 of 5003
Thread Starter 

What has happened to my life??  Remember the Grado Labs Tour?  Can you imagine what it would look like at my house?  I'll bet yours is starting to look like this.

 

New Wood.jpg

 

My wife woke up to find our latest shipment of wood, a shipment I can't tear into until I finish some projects I'm behind on.

 

stacks.jpg

 

My six-year-old asks what wood we're going to cut today.

 

Wood in the corner.jpg

 

I scratch my head and look around.

 

lathe.jpg

 

And look around.

 

drill press.jpg

 

In the meantime, my mistress - the drill press - calls out to me.

 

sander.jpg

 

But my sander also wants to play.

 

shells galore.jpg

 

By the time they're through with me, I've got my work cut out for me - and thirsty for lacquer.  I now realize why I'm doing this.  It's the laquer.  I'm probably addicted to the fumes - which would explain a lot.

post #2237 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsrule711 View Post

I was wondering what you would suggest I do next to my 60's. I currently have the quarter mod and the white cloth removed from the headphones. I also vented the driver with probably about 5 holes on each side (best mod so far love the bass). Whats next? Is my next move to get some wooden cups to put on? I dont really have the time/tools/knowledge to make my own. I know Jmoney makes some decent ones but they are fairly pricey so maybe I just need to save up. Are getting the wood cups really worth the investment? Who would you suggest I buy from?

 

Thanks

Alex



Jmoney isnt making shells anymore. Finally got a a reply to some emails I sent them before I went another route. If you're intersted shoot me an email I'm thinking about having a pair lathed from African Blackwood, but havent decided how I'm going to proceed yet. I was going to get a bigger piece of wood but the piece I'm thinking about now is only big enough for two pair. I also want to partially liberate the driver and replace the plastic cup with a wood one and I'm in the process of trying to decide what wood to use for that.

 

For all you DIY'ers out there, here is another interesting article on tonewoods from Taylor guitars, that included this chart:

 

tone.jpg

 

The Tone Zone: Tonewoods and their Relative Frequency Ranges
 

One of the most common ways to describe a wood’s tonal properties is in terms of its frequency range, which is often broken down into low-end frequencies, midrange and high-end frequencies. Picture it as a visual spectrum, as we’ve done in the chart above, with the lower frequencies on the left and the higher frequencies on the right. The graph line for each wood visually depicts its general tonal range. Rosewood and ovangkol, for example, tend to resonate with more low-end frequencies, whereas koa, cocobolo and maple tend to sound brighter from having more top-end frequencies. Note also rosewood’s “scooped” midrange and ovangkol’s fuller midrange. The dotted lines for walnut and koa denote the expansion of low-end frequency range as the guitar opens up after a period of playing it. 

 

That Ovangkol stuff looks interesting, didnt someone here make some cups with it?

 

 

post #2238 of 5003

 

backandsidewoods.jpg

 

 

tone.jpg


Not quite sure how well these two relate with each other, but still quite interesting information to digest.

 

post #2239 of 5003

Bill....thats alot of shells!!! WOW!!!! Bill..I like the real light colored wood, almost white..hint-hint-hint!!!!!! What kind of wood is that--the white or almost white on top to the right, ya know what?... just grab them and put those aside unless they are yours or spoken for...my creative juices are going now!!!!

post #2240 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaval View Post


Not quite sure how well these two relate with each other, but still quite interesting information to digest.

 



I agree, I've read through a few of these, and the general consesus seems to be to the tonal characteristics of any wood is more of a guide than any sort of hard and fast rule. It is as you say interesting information to digest and process though. Just some food for thought.

 

post #2241 of 5003
Thread Starter 

I'm still impressed with cocobolo's sheer range.  While its bass ranks third behind rosewood and ovangkol, its high-frequency sparkle matches or bests maple and koa.  Given its beauty, I just cannot say enough about this hardy, hearty Mexican tonewood.

 

Mary2.jpg

 

Okay, confession time.  I opened the boxes.  I just couldn't help myself.  My daughter is becoming the Parts Express model for our house.

 

Mary3.jpg

 

Okay, I'm opened my gifts.  Now it's time for me to get back to work!


Edited by Bilavideo - 3/17/11 at 10:31am
post #2242 of 5003

eek.gif The glorious bin of cups

post #2243 of 5003

Firstly, I'm very glad to hear your family is on the mend!

 

Nextly...Holy crap! More donuts than Boston P.D. on Fastnatch day! (If anyone here is a member of Boston's finest, I do mean this in jest, anyone who can keep that city under control has my utmost respect)
 

Those grooved ones have my particular attention, although my next step will be partial liberation of the driver. Anyone have any experience making new Gimbals? I think a peice of cut ABS pipe could be nearly perfect, and would alow us to experiment with different donut sizes more easily. I have seen a few examples of custom gimbals, but not many. (I still like the idea of brass or copper, especially after the steampunk grado thread that's floating around here.

 

Speaking of various sizes, what effect does the thickness of the donut have on the sound?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

 

shells galore.jpg

 



 

 

post #2244 of 5003

business is good smile.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

What has happened to my life??  Remember the Grado Labs Tour?  Can you imagine what it would look like at my house?  I'll bet yours is starting to look like this.

 

New Wood.jpg

 

My wife woke up to find our latest shipment of wood, a shipment I can't tear into until I finish some projects I'm behind on.

 

stacks.jpg

 

My six-year-old asks what wood we're going to cut today.

 

Wood in the corner.jpg

 

I scratch my head and look around.

 

lathe.jpg

 

And look around.

 

drill press.jpg

 

In the meantime, my mistress - the drill press - calls out to me.

 

sander.jpg

 

But my sander also wants to play.

 

shells galore.jpg

 

By the time they're through with me, I've got my work cut out for me - and thirsty for lacquer.  I now realize why I'm doing this.  It's the laquer.  I'm probably addicted to the fumes - which would explain a lot.



 

post #2245 of 5003
Thread Starter 

 

Originally Posted by Maverickmonk View Post

Firstly, I'm very glad to hear your family is on the mend!

 

Nextly...Holy crap! More donuts than Boston P.D. on Fastnatch day! (If anyone here is a member of Boston's finest, I do mean this in jest, anyone who can keep that city under control has my utmost respect)
 

Those grooved ones have my particular attention, although my next step will be partial liberation of the driver. Anyone have any experience making new Gimbals? I think a peice of cut ABS pipe could be nearly perfect, and would alow us to experiment with different donut sizes more easily. I have seen a few examples of custom gimbals, but not many. (I still like the idea of brass or copper, especially after the steampunk grado thread that's floating around here.

 

Speaking of various sizes, what effect does the thickness of the donut have on the sound?

 

1. I congratulate you on that statement: ". . . would allow us to experiment with different donut sizes more easily."  To be candid, I like making bigger shells.  I started making smaller ones to fit the gimbals, but the gimbals can be easily replaced with more elegant gimbals that don't force us to fit our work into such tight tolerances.  ABS pipe would be fine.  Cut it thin and sand off all the sharp edges.  Brushes and polished, you will have a nice and effective gimbal.  Just enlarging the gimbal a few eighths of an inch will give you the freedom to make more rugged, durable shells and avoid throwing most of that precious wood into a box full of cores.

 

2. The grooved shells are the ones with double walls, which is my response to the tight tolerances.  When you have to clear a 2" doughnut hole but layer two shells so that you don't go beyond 2 3/4", you end up with very thin shell walls.  I don't like thinner walls.  I created the double walls initially as a way of shoring up the durability of the shell, then realized that double-walling it provided two other benefits: (1) doubled contact surface and (2) a better grip.  In the future, I may end up moving on to a form of bayonet mounting, to allow for "shell rolling" (a term whose time has finally come).

 

3. Although I have had some very good experiences with longer shells (picking up artifacts that relate to a wider, grander soundstage), I'm convinced that the most critical space is that which is closest to the driver.  That's why I push for driver liberation - or at least partial liberation - and the use of effective first-stage shells.  But even sticking with slip-ons, most of the work being done is happening in the first eighths of an inch where the compression waves of the driver are the strongest.  I'm not saying the back end doesn't matter, because it definitely does.  I'm just saying that if you had one area in which to focus, I'd focus on the area closest to the driver.  Longer shells have their uses and their charms, but most of the time, there's a practical limit on how far out, beyond your head, you really want your shells to go.  It seems like we sometimes get hung up on the visuals - at least of headphones as they're laying on a table top - and either forget about the sound or don't think about what we look like when we strap on some bull horns.

 

4. My longest shells now are 1 1/2" - which are plenty long.  I go there because I get beautiful wood that sometimes comes to me that thick and I enjoy the luxury of having such long shells.  But what I'd really like to do is incorporate the front of those shells as the "inner" portion of the shell.  Now that I have a lathe, I'm going to be experimenting with maintaining the integrity of the thicker pieces and making the very front into the inner or "hat" portion of the shell.  I think a distance of 1 1/2 inches from stem to stern is ideal (for both shells together).  That said, I am no longer interested in giant GS1000-style gobstoppers hanging from each ear.  I don't think the Grado headband was ever designed to handle something like that.  I think it's inelegant and unnecessary.

 

5. When you speak of going to larger sizes - as in larger diameters - you are speaking my language.  If you look closely at the orthodynamics, particularly the LCD-2, it's interesting how these designs copy a fair amount of the grill design from Grado.  I know the type of driver is different, but when I look at something like this:

 

LCD2.jpg
 

I can't help but notice the similarities to this:

 

RS1 Grillshot.jpg

 

Obviously, the two designs are different, using different drivers, but they also share similarities, including: a minimalist headband with what looks to be rotating gimbal rods, a gimbal design (though Grado does all the way while the LCD2 simply fastens the lateral clips right onto the shell), wood shells and large, open grills.  I'm not saying one group actively copied the other (since the mechanics speak for themselves) but there's no reason why Grados could not have the diameters of the LCD2.  The LCD-2, with its orthodynamic drivers, has an obvious reason for presenting a wider face, but Grado's 40mm driver merits the same treatment.  Instead of tubing up, the next generation of Grado cans - if not modded ones - may well be one that uses the baffle disc commonly found on the K701 to widen the earspace to a circumaural "concert hall" enveloping the ears while also employing some form of the rear chamber for bass capture.

post #2246 of 5003

Damn that's nice *drool*
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

 

shells galore.jpg

 



 

post #2247 of 5003
Thread Starter 

 

Originally Posted by sml1226 View Post

Hey Bill (or anybody really) you wouldn't happen to know the height (head to cup) of the Jumbos would you? I'm still working on replacing that wire, but once I do, I need to get those things cut to a reasonable height.


I don't have my jumbos anymore.  If memory serves, I sold them to KneelJung.  I'd guess they have a diameter of four inches and a height of about two inches.  But I could be completely Rainmanning the whole thing.  "How much is a candy bar, Raymond?"  "Fifty dollars."

 

post #2248 of 5003

Bill, thanks for making me feel better about myself. I thought I was going nuts with my five pieces of wood laying around. Although if I get a drill press and lathe, I might be looking more like you. So many different woods to try out and this is a good way (simple) to see how things finish up.


 

post #2249 of 5003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post

 


I don't have my jumbos anymore.  If memory serves, I sold them to KneelJung.  I'd guess they have a diameter of four inches and a height of about two inches.  But I could be completely Rainmanning the whole thing.  "How much is a candy bar, Raymond?"  "Fifty dollars."

 


Hmm... exact same dimensions of the monster I made. Jumbos look like nothing compared to the height of the one I made. Oh well, I was thinking about 1.5", maybe less if that fails to be a reasonable looking cup, for the next attempt but that's still a little ways off. Gotta find a source of steel wire. The guitar shops won't sell any single strings. Nichrome may be getting a try if Hobby Lobby or something has some while I'm getting more foam.

And what do you do with those big hole filled blocks of wood there Bill?
post #2250 of 5003
Thread Starter 

 

Originally Posted by sml1226 View Post

And what do you do with those big hole filled blocks of wood there Bill?


I'm going to use them to create wood accessories that should have been part of the Grado experience for anyone paying $700, $1,000 or $1,700 for a headphone.  I'm not trying to be critical but you'd think for a $500 headphone you'd get some kind of royal treatment.  It should be wood, aluminum and leather everywhere: a leather headband, a wood or aluminum topper at the end of those gimbal rods, wooden rod blocks, aluminum shaft/rod locks, leather pads, wood y-splitters and wood covers for the DIY plugs running eight lines of copper for four lines of silver.  Nobody should be wearing the world's finest headphones on a ride that isn't fully pimped.  Get it, perfect it, celebrate it.

 

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