Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › My First Cans: RX900 or SRH840
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My First Cans: RX900 or SRH840 - Page 3

post #31 of 38

Price wise I would go with the RX900. I love these cans and have had no issues with sound leakage. I game with them almost everyday late at night and never had any complaints them leaking sound. Personally I think they are a bit huge so I wouldnt wear them out but I think they would definitely fit your needs.

 

BUY THEM LOL

post #32 of 38

V-Moda Bass Freq, were my first decent step up from stock earbuds with my old Sansa. Then came PoratPro, 326, AD700, 9850, XB300, X500.

 

To tell you the truth, out of all those headphones listed above, none of them really seemed like an upgrade. Although, they all have their own unique sound, and all have different purposes. The Bass Freq was the only one I had to say 'wow' to, because not only did it sound good compared to stock, but it was also in-ear. I didn't even know those existed a couple years ago, and now, I'm ready to pull the trigger on the K701...

 

Look what you've done Head-Fi.

post #33 of 38
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nobleacuff View Post

I've got the Shure SRH840's and they're great; I totally agree with all the positive feedback here. They're currently the best cans in my collection and I couldn't be happier with the purchase. For the price I don't think you can do better, and I'm sure if you buy them you'll be happy for years to come.

 

However, while they're super comfortable I would not call the Shure cans small and/or light (as others above have already noted),  and if they're really just a backup for your speakers I have another suggestion for you: the Sennheiser HD202's. I purchased a 5-pack of them (~$100 for 5 pairs!) at bswusa.com to use for large podcast recording sessions and I have been really pleasantly surprised at how good the sound quality is. Originally I didn't intend to use them for listening to music, etc., as I assumed they couldn't be that good if they only cost $20 for a pair. However, for the last year or so I've used them on a daily basis at my office and have really enjoyed them. It took a couple of weeks for the plastic headband to adjust to my head, but since then they've been comfortable, light, reasonably unobtrusive, and if they get stolen or broken you're only out $20-$25.

 

I'm sure you'll be happy with either choice, but if you'd like to find an inexpensive, lightweight headphone that you can cart around campus in a backpack and not worry about damaging or losing them, give the Senn HD202's a shot - worst case you're out $20-$25. And for what it's worth, I'm listening to my HD202's as I write this even though the Shure 840's are only 10 feet away. To my ears the 202's are a good headphone at an unbelievable price.

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Your suggestion helped much more than you know! Thank you nobleacuff. 

 

I'm really liking the idea of the HD202s. Not because I think they'd be comparable to either the JVCs or the Shures, and not because I think they'd be a good fit in terms of diversity of function. Not even because they're no small, light and portable. 

 

The HD202s bring out what I initially liked in the JVC RX700s: the price tag. These are $20 headphones with, according to you, surprisingly good audio quality--$20 headphones that can be upgraded or replaced with just a small cost to me.

 

The problem is that I really don't know exactly what I need. I've never been to college before, I've never lived in a dorm, I've used speakers all my life and I've never even used a pair of headphones. When I mentioned that these headphones would "function in the following settings," that was an educated guess. I don't know where or when or how I'll be using them. I don't even know if I'll end up using them at all. 

 

The HD202s offer a perfect solution to my debacle. For only $20, I can foray not into the world of audiophile sound, but into the world of headphone use in general. As these are closed, I can wear them on the plane on the way to school and listen to them in my dorm once I'm there. Due to their portability, I can toss them in my backpack and drag them around campus. Most importantly, I can "experiment." I can find out what I want from a headphone, where I'll be using it, and whether I even need one at all--for just a small fee. A week or two into college, I can buy whatever pair of headphones fits those needs, be it the JVCs or the Shures. 

 

It makes no sense purchasing $120 cans based on an "educated guess." It makes no sense purchasing $60 cans either.

 

$20 on the other hand? Absolutely. 

 

I truly appreciate everyone's advice so far. I think I'll be purchasing a pair of the HD202s later today, unless you guys have a better suggestion for a starter headphone in the sub $20 price range.

 

EDIT: How do the HD202s compare to the HD201s? Thanks.
 


Edited by Xombie11 - 8/4/10 at 10:39am
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xombie11 View Post

The HD202s offer a perfect solution to my debacle. For only $20, I can foray not into the world of audiophile sound, but into the world of headphone use in general. As these are closed, I can wear them on the plane on the way to school and listen to them in my dorm once I'm there. Due to their portability, I can toss them in my backpack and drag them around campus. Most importantly, I can "experiment." I can find out what I want from a headphone, where I'll be using it, and whether I even need one at all--for just a small fee. A week or two into college, I can buy whatever pair of headphones fits those needs, be it the JVCs or the Shures.

 

 

Perfect. You even had me convinced with that statement. I think you answered your original question right there.

 

That's kind of what I was trying to say a on a previous post, except I was substituting the HD202 for the RX900. With my main point being, "It's good to start a bit less expensive"

 

One thing I do love about inexpensive headphones though, is they can be put through lots of abuse. You can take them anywhere without the fear of them getting broken or lost, and you can replace them anytime due to the inexpensive replacement cost of buying another one. So I think that is a great choice that you are going with the HD202's. Stress levels decreased about 400%.

 

And of course, later on you can upgrade whenever you want.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xombie11 View Post

It makes no sense purchasing $120 cans based on an "educated guess." It makes no sense purchasing $60 cans either.

 

$20 on the other hand? Absolutely. 

 


Point taken. A very good one too. But sometimes, and "educated guess" is the best we can do. Obviously, that is not the case for you though, as these are you're first headphones. So I can understand how this statement fits you like a glove. Come to think of it, I did exactly what you did when I started buying headphones. I started low, to see what I liked and disliked, and upgraded later to improve upon my preferences and reduce the amount of dissatisfaction. Sounds like a great idea, when in fact, I didn't even realize I did that same thing myself.

post #35 of 38

I had both. The Shure 840 is in another league over the JVC 900 X. It is worth the step up IMO. Isince sold mine but my daughter uses the 900 for her ipod. Both sound good but the Shure really shine IMO

post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Katun View Post

 

Perfect. You even had me convinced with that statement. 

 

I think I  convinced myself too, haha.

 

I decided upon a pair of Panasonic RP-HTX7s in white, for $27 shipped from Amazon. I like the retro design, the SQ is on par with the HD201/202 (perhaps slightly better), and they're more portable due to a shorter cord with an extension. 

 

The funny thing is, these were the first headphones I ever considered getting, after reading through this (http://themacfeed.com/2010/06/themacfeeds-back-to-school-guide/) and their subsequent review. I changed my mind when I saw the RX700s. I really should have gone with my gut!

 

Thanks again for all your help, guys. Who knows, I may revisit this thread sooner than I think. 

 


 

post #37 of 38

What is the design purpose of the two wires exposed on the SRH840s?

post #38 of 38

They are single entry, which means that the plug only goes into one side of the headphones.

 

The cable that sticks out carries the signal to the other ear.

 

It's probably the biggest problem with the Shures, because one bad snag and you'd be looking at a pretty complex rewiring.  It won't likely happen if you're careful, but there's no question that designs that incorporate that cable into the headband better (ala AKG and Beyerdynamic) is a superior design.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › My First Cans: RX900 or SRH840