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Easiest Balanced DIY amp. - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 


Thanks a ton MrSlim.

 

The one I borrowed was actually the exact same model you warned against haha. I though something was up.

 

Thanks for the ebay link, I will most likely buy that listing.

 

this is getting exciting. Now all i need is time to buy all the parts and pcb board and a clean space to get DIYing

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSlim View Post

If it looks something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Weller-WEL8200PK-120-Volt-Universal-Soldering/dp/B00002N7S0/ref=pd_cp_hi_1, then no,  it has way too much power for the type of soldering you would be doing. There are even higher powered models..  You want something like this: http://cgi.ebay.com/50W-soldering-STATION-4-TIPS-kit-solder-iron-NEW-tmc-/300442293106?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item45f3c19372.  It looks that same as mine, probably from the same Chinese factory, and it works great. And you get the bonus of 4 tips..

 

You will also want one of these: http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Solder-Sucker-Desoldering-Pump-Removal-Tool-/250660135124?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a5c8220d4.

 

It will save your butt when you make a mistake and need to unsolder something.. 

 

Besides that, get yourself some good side cutters, small needle nose pliers, some fine guage resin core solder, and a cheap digital meter, and you'll be set for doing the Guts of DIY..

 

When you start into case work, then it's handy to have a friend who has some power tools that he'll let you use, unless you have your own.  I've done all my casework with a cheap drill press I snagged off Craigslist, some shoulder bits for doing bigger holes, and a Dremel knockoff I got at 50% off ( and paid for with CdnTire money(Canucks will know what I'm talking about). 

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallenAngel View Post

Off the top of my head DIY, just CMOY, A47, PINT, Mini3.

As for commercial - just about every portable amp.


I would say that your comment is a gross over-generalization.  The PINT and mini³ are hardly "tweaked" versions of the CMOY design.  Do they both use opamps, sure, but by your apparent definition a CD player's output stage that uses an opamp is a tweaked CMOY. 

 

As to the OP's question I'll repeat what I've said many times over, DIY is generally a pretty poor way to save $$.  I'd also view the beta22 or dynahi/mite as horrible first, second, heck 10th projects. 

post #18 of 24

It's much easier to fix a cmoy after frying something than a beta22 eh? (not to mention the joys of casing) :) 

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by n_maher View Post

 I'd also view the beta22 or dynahi/mite as horrible first, second, heck 10th projects. 

 

 

I don’t thoroughly concede this as a blanket assumption as there are always exceptions. The balance of success and failure with tackling first builds such as these without prior experience rests with the mindset of the builder at hand.

 

The key is in the knowledge of all possible known errors and mistakes before building, which equates to many months of reading, solder practice and good shot of granddad’s best whisky before pulling the pin and forking over money for something that could end up scrap.

 

It was one of the best experiences I’ve had, so horrible is not a word I’d use.

post #20 of 24

Myself, I hate to use the term "CMoy" at all. Sure, he did popularize the amp, but in reality

it is just a non-inverting amp based on a single op-amp. almost every op-amp data sheet has

some version of this circuit on it. In that regard, you could say the "CMoy" is found almost

everywhere but that is the same as calling all pain medication aspirin...

post #21 of 24

Some people can build a B22 as their first electronics project, most people cant. Thats fine.  

 

What does one loose by building a few easy to intermediate difficulty/complexity electronics projects for practice and experience rather than jumping in and building "the one" amp? A few dollars and a few hours is all. Some time spent gaining experience VS the sad reality of people who set out to build ambitious first projects and wind up with spectacular failures. To compound matters when you ask about how the amplifier of fail (fail goes in, fail*gain comes out!) is set up their lack of experience generates a meaningless answer. There is no help for these people when they need it. Nobody likes to be a part of this sort of thing and IMO it brings the forum down to see or hear about someone's busted amp, even if you knew the train would crash before it left the station... It brings me down anyways.

 

Building a Cmoy complexity amp that works right on the first try is still something I'm proud to accomplish. I still get a little anxious the first time I fire up even a simple amp. I still get a thrill when it works right too.

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

Yeah I will check into the cmoy before dishing out tons of cash for the beta.

 

Hopefully I can do the cmoy, then the CK.

 

are op-amps hard to solder? I wanted to avoid the tiny ones found in the mini3 because they looked so easy to mess up :/

 

Might not at all be the case, but the discreet amps looked easier to build because the parts are bigger.

post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by n_maher View Post




I would say that your comment is a gross over-generalization.  The PINT and mini³ are hardly "tweaked" versions of the CMOY design.  Do they both use opamps, sure, but by your apparent definition a CD player's output stage that uses an opamp is a tweaked CMOY. 

 

As to the OP's question I'll repeat what I've said many times over, DIY is generally a pretty poor way to save $$.  I'd also view the beta22 or dynahi/mite as horrible first, second, heck 10th projects. 


Why is it a poor way to save money?

 

Seems like anything that comes close to a B22 in retail is quite a bit more expensive or doesn't exist.

post #24 of 24

Good tools cost $$, to do a good job you need good tools. 


Example - some would claim you can build a 2ch beta22 for $300.  Technically, can one do that?  Probably.  But I'd wager it's a safer bet to assume it'll cost at least twice that much and probably more by the time you're done.  And that end product won't look anywhere near as finished as the most basic commercial offering. 

 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sokolov91 View Post


Why is it a poor way to save money?

 

Seems like anything that comes close to a B22 in retail is quite a bit more expensive or doesn't exist.

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