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Klipsch Custom 3 at $109 - good value? - Page 2

post #16 of 34

err you looked at the dates?

 

but yes the kc3's are great sounding, rubbish cable but sound fab

post #17 of 34

Yep, I'm stupid to try my chances with old threads but hey, you found my post :) thank you very much. haha, do they sound superior to ue700? They are 50usd where I can buy them.

post #18 of 34

oh yes they are very much better than the UE700.  at US$50 they are an utter steal!

post #19 of 34

Are they available somewhere for $50??

post #20 of 34

yeah, here locally but sadly they now a goner, buyer was to damn fast :( sorry to keep hopes up.

post #21 of 34

are klipsch custom 3 worth 150$??

 

or what will be better??

 

custom 3 or xba-3??

post #22 of 34

assuming thats US$ then yeah they are worth it but have caveats.  the cable is the single worst cable ever used on anything since humans put cables on things.

 

otherwise they have the most wondrous warm and rich, luscious sound for a dual BA IEM. 

 

however ive not heard the xba so youll really need to read up on both but if its to be your only IEM maybe skip the KC3, its cable its spectacularly bad.

post #23 of 34

i think you need more clarity to how you explain things..

 

The Custom 2 and Custom 3 both have 2 armatures.

 

The thing is that the Custom 2 has a single body dual armature unit, no crossover.

While the Custom 3 has 2 independent armatures with different response frequencies with a cross over, Thats why its so important to be clear about the term dual armature.

 

Same with the UE triple.fi 10 pro, everyone was excited for it being a triple armature, while the SE530 from shure, the Westone 3 and other tri armature builds were 3 independent armatures with 3 cross overs and different frequency responses the triple fi was actually a single + dual armature configuration, with one for highs, and a dual for bass. with a single crossover seperating them.

 

sorry to be a pain, but i think its important that people understand it.

post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by knubbe View Post

I think they would be pretty hard to beat at that price, unless you could get TF10s for a similar amount

I agree
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aevum View Post
 

i think you need more clarity to how you explain things..

 

The Custom 2 and Custom 3 both have 2 armatures.

 

The thing is that the Custom 2 has a single body dual armature unit, no crossover.

While the Custom 3 has 2 independent armatures with different response frequencies with a cross over, Thats why its so important to be clear about the term dual armature.

 

Same with the UE triple.fi 10 pro, everyone was excited for it being a triple armature, while the SE530 from shure, the Westone 3 and other tri armature builds were 3 independent armatures with 3 cross overs and different frequency responses the triple fi was actually a single + dual armature configuration, with one for highs, and a dual for bass. with a single crossover seperating them.

 

sorry to be a pain, but i think its important that people understand it.

yes the KC2 is a 1 way dual BA, the KC3 is a 2 way dual BA, sorry i just assume people are familiar with this stuff, particularly anyone whos been around here long enough to know what the KC3 is.

post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post
 

yes the KC2 is a 1 way dual BA, the KC3 is a 2 way dual BA, sorry i just assume people are familiar with this stuff, particularly anyone whos been around here long enough to know what the KC3 is.


can u pls explain again

 

sorry to bother u but i actually need to know regarding crossover etc

post #27 of 34

Ok...

 

Balanced Armature 101,

 

A balanced armature is a closed microspeaker which is more accurate in small spaces then a Dynamic cone speaker,

 

The benefits is that it sounds good with much less airflow then a dynamic speaker and it requires less power to operate,

The problems are that they are hard to make for wide frequency responses and the sound expansion is much narrower then a dynamic speaker (the sound comes out in a vector instead of a expanding cone), also the increased sensability can affect quality at high power output,

 

So you can have a mediocre/OK single armature earpiece or a excelent multiarmature ear piece, but this isnt 100% true as companies like Phonaks or Ultimate ears have managed to make excelent single armature earphones using modifications and acustic casings, (see phonaks PFE1xx or Ultimate Ears Super.fi 5 v2 / UE 600), so there are exceptions to that rule,

 

Now there are different types, Single, Dual And Multi

 

A single armature is exactly what the name says, 1 armature with a set frequency response in a single casing, No crossover needed. Examples: Kplich Custom 1, Ultimate Ears UE600,

A dual armature is 2 armatures with a set frequency firing inside a single casing No crossovers are used as the 2 armatures feed off the same input and fire at the same response frequencies, Examples : Klipch Custom 2, UE700, Jays Q-Jays.

A Multi armature is actually several single armatures with different inputs and different frequency responses  bundled togather inside the same ear piece, The number of armatures can vary from 2 to how many you can physicly cram in to a earpiece (i think that the pissing contest between UE and Jerry harvy is up to 16 per ear piece), While you can install a crossover per armature its usualy grouped to Lows, Mids and Highs with a Crossover filtering the input so the armature/armatures in question only recive the frequencies they are sopposed to reproduce, so in a sane design a maximum of 3 crossovers would be needed, 1 for high, one for lows and one for mids. 

 

What is a crossover...

 

A crossover is a little electrical circuit that filters the incoming signal and "shaves off" the frequencies you want it to, so if you wanted to feed a bass/lows armature, you would program a crossover that only lets through from 10hz to around 320hz,

There are 2 main reasons why you would do that, As anyone who builds or knows a bit about speakers you know you have different speakers with different physical shapes to reproduce different frequencies, thats why a component speaker has woofers (optimized for bass), Twitters (optimized for highs) and central speakers (optimized for mids), the size and electrical properties of the speaker itself set which range it reproduces the best,

 

But if you had the entire signal going to all 3 speakers, the highs coming out of the woofer or the bass coming out of the twitters might not be exactly pleasent to listen too... everything from clipping to just badly reproduced frequencies would ruin the listening expiriance, so the crossovers make sure that only thats suppose to go to that speaker does so,

 

The other problem is less of an issue but still unpleasent for some, having the same output come out of several speakers with different frequency responses and different electrical properties can cause a echo effect which can be unpleasent.

 

So going back to the KC1 vs KC2 vs KC3 discussion...

 

The KC1 has a single armature and does not require a crossover since you only have a single armature reproducing a single frequency range.

The KC2 has a dual armature that also does not require a crossover since you have 2 armatures in a single casing reproducing the same frequency range,

The KC3 has 2 independent armatures each with its own case with 2 different frequency response ranges, meaning you need to put 2 crossovers, one letting in only lows to the bass armautre and one letting the mids and the highs to the high armature.

 

Some pictures for the kids :

 


Single Armature, As you can see, 1 casing, 1 exit.

 

A dual armature : As you can see you have two armatures in the same body with a single exit, No crossover.

 


Triple.Fi 10 pro diagram showing the crossover, Take in to account that for efficiency many earphones put several crossovers on the same PCB

 

Examples...

 

Westone 3 : Has 3 different armatures in 3 different casings, one for Highs, one for Lows and one for Mids, it also has 3 crossovers making sure the highs armature only gets highs, the bass armature only gets lows and the midrange armature only gets mids.

Ultimate ears Triple.Fi 10: Has 3 armatures but in a combination of a single armature for Highs, and a dual armature for Mids and Bass, It means that it has 3 armatures in 2 casings with 2 crossovers, one crossover for the single highs armature and one crossover for the dual mid/bass armature.

 

Hopfully this small "how do multiplie armatures and crossovers work" class was usfull to explain what you wanted to know.


Edited by Aevum - 10/30/13 at 12:54pm
post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aevum View Post
 

Ok...

 

Balanced Armature 101,

 

A balanced armature is a closed microspeaker which is more accurate in small spaces then a Dynamic cone speaker,

 

The benefits is that it sounds good with much less airflow then a dynamic speaker and it requires less power to operate,

The problems are that they are hard to make for wide frequency responses and the sound expansion is much narrower then a dynamic speaker (the sound comes out in a vector instead of a expanding cone), also the increased sensability can affect quality at high power output,

 

So you can have a mediocre/OK single armature earpiece or a excelent multiarmature ear piece, but this isnt 100% true as companies like Phonaks or Ultimate ears have managed to make excelent single armature earphones using modifications and acustic casings, (see phonaks PFE1xx or Ultimate Ears Super.fi 5 v2 / UE 600), so there are exceptions to that rule,

 

Now there are different types, Single, Dual And Multi

 

A single armature is exactly what the name says, 1 armature with a set frequency response in a single casing, No crossover needed. Examples: Kplich Custom 1, Ultimate Ears UE600,

A dual armature is 2 armatures with a set frequency firing inside a single casing No crossovers are used as the 2 armatures feed off the same input and fire at the same response frequencies, Examples : Klipch Custom 2, UE700, Jays Q-Jays.

A Multi armature is actually several single armatures with different inputs and different frequency responses  bundled togather inside the same ear piece, The number of armatures can vary from 2 to how many you can physicly cram in to a earpiece (i think that the pissing contest between UE and Jerry harvy is up to 16 per ear piece), While you can install a crossover per armature its usualy grouped to Lows, Mids and Highs with a Crossover filtering the input so the armature/armatures in question only recive the frequencies they are sopposed to reproduce, so in a sane design a maximum of 3 crossovers would be needed, 1 for high, one for lows and one for mids. 

 

What is a crossover...

 

A crossover is a little electrical circuit that filters the incoming signal and "shaves off" the frequencies you want it to, so if you wanted to feed a bass/lows armature, you would program a crossover that only lets through from 10hz to around 320hz,

There are 2 main reasons why you would do that, As anyone who builds or knows a bit about speakers you know you have different speakers with different physical shapes to reproduce different frequencies, thats why a component speaker has woofers (optimized for bass), Twitters (optimized for highs) and central speakers (optimized for mids), the size and electrical properties of the speaker itself set which range it reproduces the best,

 

But if you had the entire signal going to all 3 speakers, the highs coming out of the woofer or the bass coming out of the twitters might not be exactly pleasent to listen too... everything from clipping to just badly reproduced frequencies would ruin the listening expiriance, so the crossovers make sure that only thats suppose to go to that speaker does so,

 

The other problem is less of an issue but still unpleasent for some, having the same output come out of several speakers with different frequency responses and different electrical properties can cause a echo effect which can be unpleasent.

 

So going back to the KC1 vs KC2 vs KC3 discussion...

 

The KC1 has a single armature and does not require a crossover since you only have a single armature reproducing a single frequency range.

The KC2 has a dual armature that also does not require a crossover since you have 2 armatures in a single casing reproducing the same frequency range,

The KC3 has 2 independent armatures each with its own case with 2 different frequency response ranges, meaning you need to put 2 crossovers, one letting in only lows to the bass armautre and one letting the mids and the highs to the high armature.

 

Examples...

 

Westone 3 : Has 3 different armatures in 3 different casings, one for Highs, one for Lows and one for Mids, it also has 3 crossovers making sure the highs armature only gets highs, the bass armature only gets lows and the midrange armature only gets mids.

Ultimate ears Triple.Fi 10: Has 3 armatures but in a combination of a single armature for mid and highs, and a dual armature for bass, It means that it has 3 armatures in 2 casings with 2 crossovers, one crossover for the single mid/highs armature and one crossover for the dual bass armatures.

 

Hopfully this small "how do multiplie armatures and crossovers" class was usfull to explain.


i love u man,,,,lol

 

no seriously i understood it quite well,thanks

post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post
 

assuming thats US$ then yeah they are worth it but have caveats.  the cable is the single worst cable ever used on anything since humans put cables on things.

 

otherwise they have the most wondrous warm and rich, luscious sound for a dual BA IEM. 

 

Great sound, bad fit and worst cable ever. I got mine on sale for $100 and had them reshelled by Fisher (InEarz.com). Very happy with the result.

post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRCMRGN View Post
 

Great sound, bad fit and worst cable ever. I got mine on sale for $100 and had them reshelled by Fisher (InEarz.com). Very happy with the result.


yup i got the message and got brainwavz m3,,,,way more cheaper and i like them

 

they may not be at the level of custom 3 but are pretty good for a 90$ earphone............i would say best in the range

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