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My DIY electrostatic headphones - Page 51

post #751 of 1487

Are the XLR connectors even rated for such high voltages? It seems a bit dangerous to me.

post #752 of 1487

The setup I'm describing is only temporary. If think it would be clearer as to why I am no too worried about the xrl connectors if you saw it entirely biggrin.gif Eventually I want to build something that looks as much as possible like a pair of headphones, that is why I'm looking for the original stax male plug.

 

If you glance at chinsettawong first diy headphones, you will se that the cable and plug he is using aren't really recommended either (this is how i interpret the picture anyway).

post #753 of 1487
Quote:
Originally Posted by bidoux View Post

I have been using a 3 pins XLR connector for my mono prototype. Although this is not respecting the XLR's datasheet I am not sure it is an actual issue. On a related thought, as anyone found male stax plug ? I still have the female sockets Franck Cooter gave away but can't match it yet ...
i have two solutions.

1. To buy a Stax extension cable. Cut off the female plug at one end-- this can be your headphone jack on your DIY ES amp. Then you get one Stax headphone cable with a male plug. You can make it to your headphone cable.

2. Use the air plugs. Air plugs (I am not sure if there is a more proper name in English for them) are originally used in aircrafts. They are designed to carry very high voltage (400V?) which is much safer than the XLR connectors.
post #754 of 1487
Air plug is something like this. What do you call it?
http://bestdragon.en.made-in-china.com/product/IBEnwhSVYQWx/China-Air-Plugs.html

If you are making a DIY headphone and amp, and do not require them to be compatible with the Stax headphones, the air plug may be a good choice for your cable and amp.
Edited by koikoi - 3/30/13 at 7:10pm
post #755 of 1487

These don't really have a technical name. In America, their generic name is "CB microphone connector".

 

And from the experience I have with those, I highly doubt they are better than XLR. There may have been high quality ones at some point that were rated for 400 V, but the cheap ones available today probably aren't.

post #756 of 1487
Quote:
Originally Posted by bidoux View Post

Thanks Spritzer

Though it seems that this connector needs to be inserted in some sort of housing to make it usable. Maybe a XLR shell ?

 

That's exactly what I do.  You need to cut off the "lip" on the back for it to fit inside the XLR shell.  Here is a pic of a ESP950 adapter I made:

 

post #757 of 1487
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

These don't really have a technical name. In America, their generic name is "CB microphone connector".

And from the experience I have with those, I highly doubt they are better than XLR. There may have been high quality ones at some point that were rated for 400 V, but the cheap ones available today probably aren't.
I think those plugs are widely used in occasions that need highly secure connections.

e.g. I found these ones with rated current 25A and rated voltage 500V. They are definitely not for "microphone connectors". and they are not expensive at all.



In terms of sound quality, I think the XLR connectors may be better. There must be some XLR connectors with high rated voltage, If I can find, I will use XLR connectors.
post #758 of 1487
Thread Starter 

When I started making my headphones, I used only materials which could be bought easily locally.  The cable was ordinary paired cable and the jack was a cheap 5 pin DIN jack.  Surprisingly, they worked without problem.  

 

Nowadays, I use the extention cord from KOSS.  It's good and cheap.  wink_face.gif

 

Wachara C.

post #759 of 1487
Thread Starter 

For connectors, something like these work fine too:

 

 

Wachara C.


Edited by chinsettawong - 3/31/13 at 9:43pm
post #760 of 1487

Yup, many manufacturers used DIN plugs for electrostatic models.  All low bias though. 

post #761 of 1487

Hi Spritzer and everyone,

Do you guys have any idea why all ES headphones are with parallels cables not twisted ones? Is it because to avoid interference brought by the bias voltage wire?

 

I am about to make my own ES headphone cable and found that it is difficult to find parallels cables. The only thing I found is the Nordost flat cables. But the Nordost cables are not soft enough to make headphone cables.

 

Thanks,

 

koikoi


Edited by koikoi - 4/3/13 at 3:05pm
post #762 of 1487

Only use Stax or Koss cables. The Koss extension cable is the cheapest, around $10 from the factory.

Stax cables can be found on ebay, but are not cheap.

 

Electrostatic cables are double insulated (with the correct materials) to withstand the high voltage,

the conductor spacing is designed to maintain low impedance and low capacitance.

Very important parameters when one considers the electrical load an electrostatic headphone represents. 

Any old cable isn't going to do the job.

post #763 of 1487
Hi livewire,
Do you know where can I find the $10 Koss cable? I googled a lot but cannot find anything on the internet.
Thanks,
koikoi
post #764 of 1487

At Koss of course.

Call their customer service at 1-800-USA-KOSS,

Ask for a replacement "extension cable" for a ESP-950 headphone.

post #765 of 1487
Hi livewire,
Thanks. I am not in US, but I will try with local Koss branch.
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