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My DIY electrostatic headphones - Page 5

post #61 of 1517
Thread Starter 

Thanks folks for your compliments and encouragements.  I really appreciate them.

 

Wachara C.

post #62 of 1517

Those earpads really aren't all that comfortable, long live the 70's and vinyl everything... smily_headphones1.gif  You could have some earpads made from real leather (which should breath a bit) or copy the Sennheiser HE60/90 design which uses a fabric in contact with the head but the rest is vinyl/leather. 

post #63 of 1517

This is amazing work.  Now I'm itching for a CNC even more.  Too bad you don't live close I would have loved to auditioned them.

 

The ear pads do look uncomfortably thin.  How's the soundstage & leakage with these as closed headphones?

post #64 of 1517
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Region2 View Post

This is amazing work.  Now I'm itching for a CNC even more.  Too bad you don't live close I would have loved to auditioned them.

 

The ear pads do look uncomfortably thin.  How's the soundstage & leakage with these as closed headphones?


Hi Region2,

 

CNC is an amazing machine.  I just love it.

 

The headphones are not closed back though.

 

IMG_0838.jpg

 

As I'm typing this, I'm listening to them right now.  Even though the ear pads are not that comfortable, they do make pretty good seals.  The sound stage isn't as open as my previous version which has a big open back, but it's not bad - not bad at all.

 

Now I need to find someone who can help me make a pair of leather pads.  smily_headphones1.gif

 

Wachara C.

post #65 of 1517


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chinsettawong View Post

Hi Region2,

 

CNC is an amazing machine.  I just love it.

 

The headphones are not closed back though.

 

IMG_0838.jpg

 

As I'm typing this, I'm listening to them right now.  Even though the ear pads are not that comfortable, they do make pretty good seals.  The sound stage isn't as open as my previous version which has a big open back, but it's not bad - not bad at all.

 

Now I need to find someone who can help me make a pair of leather pads.  smily_headphones1.gif

 

Wachara C.


That's embarrassing.  Thanks for the correction!  Too bad the housing isn't more rounded, I wonder how they would feel and sound if you could put on some pads from the O2.  I'm sure if you can get some patterns down you can find some customs leather company to get it made for you.  I've been considering this for some of my other headphones as well.

post #66 of 1517
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Region2 View Post


 


That's embarrassing.  Thanks for the correction!  Too bad the housing isn't more rounded, I wonder how they would feel and sound if you could put on some pads from the O2.  I'm sure if you can get some patterns down you can find some customs leather company to get it made for you.  I've been considering this for some of my other headphones as well.


Too bad that I can't find any O2 pads to try.  frown.gif

 

Wachara C.

post #67 of 1517
Thread Starter 

I've been listening to my new headphones for a few days.  I find that the treble on these headphones is a little better than my fully open back version.  Do you think that the less open area and a piece of sponge at the back side of the drivers cause a little coloration on the sound?

 

Wachara C.

post #68 of 1517

With any obstruction to the backwave you will get a colored sound, no way around it.  The Stax 4070 is a marvel of engineering but the effect its closed shell is clearly evident in the midrange.  It's hard to say how these drivers behave in that chassis but it is certainly well worth it to try different damping setups.  Felt, wool and other semi acoustically transparent materials have worked well in the past. 

post #69 of 1517
Thread Starter 

Hi Spritzer,

 

Thanks so much for your information.  I searched your old threads, and I found that you mentioned once that you didn't like the sound from these Marantz headphones.  You said that they didin't fixed the drivers in place and the sound wasn't that good.  Could you tell me how the drivers in the original Marantz were put?

 

May I ask something about Stax?  How do they prevent sweat from entering into the drivers?  The way I do it is to put a layer of diaphragm between my ears and the drivers.  Is this a good way?

 

Wachara C.

 

post #70 of 1517

I'm digging way back here but I think they were built like the Magnavox unit.  There they just fitted the driver in a circular slot on the baffle and fixed it in place with the foam behind it.  No care was taken to eliminate baffle leak and thus they sounded dreadful...

 

All Stax sets from 1960 have had a film next to the ear to seal off the driver and after 1994 all of the models also have a PVC film on the back as well.  If you want to see how the brand new Stax phones are made, Google "SR-507 investigation".  I can't give you the link as it will just be deleted...

post #71 of 1517
Thread Starter 

Hi Spritzer,

 

Those are really nice pictures.  Seeing those pictures has answered a lot of the questions I have in mind.  Thank you so much. 

 

I really appreciate all your help.

 

Wachara C.

 

post #72 of 1517

Happy to help.  I did void the warranty doing that but it was well worth it to see what they are up to.   

post #73 of 1517

My old headphones uses 12.7 micron polyurathane.

Where can I get the thin mylar 2 to 6 microns in small quantities in North America?

post #74 of 1517
Thread Starter 

Hi tmblack,

 

I have some 3 micron Mylar which sounds very nice on my headphones.  If you like I can send some to you.  :)

 

Wachara C.

post #75 of 1517
Thread Starter 

Hi tmblack,

 

You can also buy the 1.4 and 0.9 microns Mylar from http://www.indoorspecialties.com/ .

 

Wachara C.

 

 

 

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