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Hearing Lose.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

 

 

After reading numerous posts about the fact that you suffer hearing lose with age (which is a fact of life),including some stating that if you can hear nothing over 14khz you may as well give up,I am posting this simple chart to show those with hearing lose that they have not lost anything to be worried about.

 

Enjoy the Music.

 

fChart.jpg

post #2 of 20

Mmm yes but i believe harmonics do play a role in how you perceive the sounds too?

The chart only reflects the fundamentals

 

Alternative chart:

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm


Edited by lazybum - 6/16/10 at 12:39am
post #3 of 20

Those are both very interesting charts. Thanks for posting!

 

I've also got a pretty good ringing in my ears that keeps me from getting much out of sounds around 7k, but I keep listening and enjoying anyway. I don't think anyone should give up hope. There's something out there to be enjoyed

 

post #4 of 20

That's bull. Everyone knows that 440hz is A4.

 

E: whoops, that text format is really dodgy. I read from left to right.


Edited by Trysaeder - 6/16/10 at 11:42pm
post #5 of 20

Loss, not lose.

post #6 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by stang View Post

Loss, not lose.

LOL.  I was waiting for some one to point that out.
 

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stang View Post

Loss, not lose.



I am at a complete lose.

post #8 of 20

Lol. I hope that misspelling was intended 

post #9 of 20

Why is it improper to say lose? Because you lose your hearing, you don't loss it.. 

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoneLover94 View Post

Why is it improper to say lose? Because you lose your hearing, you don't loss it.. 


You are joking right? 

post #11 of 20

Guys, the biggest problem with loss of ability to detect high frequency sounds is not being unable to hear instruments, but from being unable to make out the high frequency sounds in word pronunciation. For example words that have "tch, sh, ch, ke, ps" sounds will be a little more difficult to hear...  please listen to music responsibly!

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmars78 View Post




You are joking right? 


Maybe... Idk im confused. English is one of the hardest languages. ( I know, I was born in America and spoken English all my life. I am pure American, but still, the English language and what we use as common words aren't correct...ahh!! Im glad I dont have to think about this anymore... Summer =)

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoneLover94 View Post

Why is it improper to say lose? Because you lose your hearing, you don't loss it.. 

 

Are you American or English? Did your middle school not have English classes? Or is this just memory lose?

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caden View Post

Guys, the biggest problem with loss of ability to detect high frequency sounds is not being unable to hear instruments, but from being unable to make out the high frequency sounds in word pronunciation. For example words that have "tch, sh, ch, ke, ps" sounds will be a little more difficult to hear...  please listen to music responsibly!


The hairs that detect frequencies above 14k are the most sensitive, anything below that is pretty tank. Human voices can only make up to 12k, which is well below the limit.

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post

 

Are you American or English? Did your middle school not have English classes? Or is this just memory lose?


I am American. Born and raised here. Caucasian. Yes, I have had an English class all through school, but that doesn't change it from being on of the hardest languages in the world. Many things that we say today are actually improper for English, but because we commonly say them we think they are right. This may not be an example, but just pointing it out I guess.

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