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Confused: Vinyl(Analog) vs Digital - Page 4

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

1. I don't know. There's a lot of debate and I've gotten incredible sound from both digital and analog. With digital, I prefer hi-rez; I run both SACD and DVD-A. It is safe to say you can get great sound from both. Which is why I run both. Format snobbery is not going to get in the way of enjoying music.

2. Vinyl is often better mastered than the typical "Loudness War" CD you find today. But CDs can be mastered very, very well. One reason I love SACD is that it is sort of a guarantee that the mastering is done well. Though that argument is complicated because the vast majority of SACDs are classical and jazz, which tend to be mastered very well on CDs. Still, I'll pay a few extra dollars for hi-rez. I like to get the best possible recording.

3. Vinyl playback is tricky and capricious. The gear can be viciously expensive, then you have to set it up correctly. Even then, there's a bit of maintenance and upkeep. My hi-rez digital players are a lot easier to deal with. Still, I found it worthwhile to invest deeply in vinyl playback. The technology hasn't changed much, so I think the rig will be about as good as it gets for years. Digital changes every 18-24 months. I won't spend a lot on digital because something better and cheaper is usually on the horizon. For digital, I'll hang a generation or two behind and upgrade with used gear when it gets affordable. I don't think the Michell Orbe and SME IV will be much improved upon in the next 20-30 years, so I went whole hog. I could be wrong, but I doubt it. There isn't a lot of R&D being sunk into vinyl, so what's good today will probably be good in 2021 and beyond.



I enjoyed reading Uncle Eric's thoughts on the matter. I think he's a real smart guy. Like UE, I think it's all good. I've got a 32 year old Sony PS-4750 TT with Shure V15 VMR. Each  has satisfied me from day one. Today, this TT/Cart is used to get my LP collection into my iTunes library.Thing is, I cannot distinguish the digitized material from the original LP's when I've set recording levels decently. In fact, most everything I've got in my iTunes library, from 256k downloads to 24/96 wav files sounds as good as SACD from my Sony DVP-S9000ES. My route from laptop to JBL L100t3's: Windows 7 up-sampled to 24/96 USB, to X-FI HD converted to optical S/PDIF, to Sony TA-E9000ES pre/pro.


Edited by sterling1 - 8/2/11 at 5:40am
post #47 of 54

Got both, digital has the edge for me, if you take all eventualities on board, though I do prefer the more natural sound of vinyl, even with the snap crackle and pop.

post #48 of 54

The great part is that we have a ton of choices out there. Really after all it's based much on style. The LP guys are kinda like cool cats now. They think they are better. They think that there is really no contest as records are better. The LP guys really have it much harder. Look at what they do to get music.

 

 

1) Records take up space and he can warp them. They must be kept in order, but because he can't tilt his head at the correct angle to read the spine, finding one is really a chore. He need glasses if he is 50 just to read the spine. They are not in order like on a computer. So the LP guy has to look really high or really low and try to tilt his head and read these silly letters at the wrong angle as he is almost falling down.

 

He has very little light in his listening room so he trips on stuff walking along still looking for that @#$%^% record. Now he is pulling the records out and looking at the front covers because he can't find the thing! Where did it go?" Did someone barrow my record?" Finally it was the one record somehow pushed back in the collection and he went right by it." I knew where it was all the time."

 

 

2) He now has to make sure to get it out of the jacket. They roll out at times. Now he needs to clean the record. He needs to turn on the record cleaning machine. He has to get out the solution! He looks closely the record has two sides. Crap it was a double album. He has to get the other record and clean that one. He first puts the clean one back into the jacket.

 

OK........3) He takes the dust cover off the turntable. He has to dust the belts. He then gets the needle cleaner solution and very slowly cleans the needle. He uses an anti-static gun on the platter. He lowers the record onto the platter. At this point anything can happen if the trajectory is off there is a remote chance he will hit the grooves of the record with the edge of the platter. This record is from 1968 and will never be able to be found in this condition ever again. There is a level of stress here. Not maybe the level of stress doing open hart surgery but maybe the level of stress of just holding his breath for a moment every time he puts a new record on. He then screws down the record clamp. This is all well but at this point he is reminded if the record is warped or not.

He turns on the turntable and picks up the needle and places it at the exact place on the record as he holds his breath not to damage the needle.

 

4) Music is finally heard. It's been 45 min. from the time he started looking for the record. The record side is less than 15 min long. Then the process starts all over again.

 

5) He forgot to check the rpm speed. This record could be playing too fast? He needs adjustment here right in the middle of the side.

 

 

 

 

The digital guy turns on the PC finds the picture in the dark on I-Tunes and pushes play.

 

 

 


Edited by Redcarmoose - 8/2/11 at 9:25am
post #49 of 54



Yeah, LoL, thats those eventualities I mentioned, pure therapy when in the mood though. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

The great part is that we a a ton of choices out there. Really after all it's based much on style. The LP guys are kinda like cool cats now. They think they are better. They think that there is really no contest as records are better. The LP guys really have it much harder. Look at what they do to get music.

 

 

1) Records take up space and he can warp them. They must be kept in order, but because he can't tilt his head at the correct angle to read the spine it is really a chore. He need glasses if he is 50 just to read the spine. They are not in order like on a computer. So the LP guy has to look really high or really low and try to tilt his head and read these silly letters at the wrong angle as he is almost falling down. He has very little light in his listening room so he trips on stuff walking along still looking for that @#$%^% record. Now he is pulling the records out and looking at the front covers because he can't find the thing! Where did it go?" Did someone barrow my record?" Finally it was the one record somehow pushed back in the collection and he went right by it." I knew where it was all the time."

 

 

2) He now has to make sure to get it out of the jacket. They roll out at times. Now he needs to clean the record. He need to turn on the record cleaning machine.He has to get out the solution! He looks closely the record has two sides. Crap it was a double album. He has to get the other record and clean that one. He first puts the clean one back into the jacket.

 

OK........3) He takes the dust cover off the turn table. He has to dust the belts. He uses an anti-static gun on the platter. He lowers the record onto the platter. He then screws down the record clamp. This is all well but at this point he is reminded if the record is warped or not.

He turns on the turntable and picks up the needle and places it at the exact place on the record as he holds his breath not to damage the needle.

 

4) Music is finally heard. It's been 45 min. from the time he started looking for the record. The record side is less than 15 min long. Then the process starts all over again.

 

5) He forgot to check the rpm speed. This record could be playing too fast? We need adjustment here right in the middle of the side.

 

 

 

 

The digital guy turns on the PC finds the picture in the dark on I-Tunes and pushes play.

 

 

 



 

post #50 of 54

Lots of Jazz is still recorded in analogue and it still has a way bigger spectrum and more flavor. By the same token some things sound better in digital. Of all the stuff, reel to reel sounds the best of all and tubes sound better than solid state (transistors) Most audiophiles will tell you the same thing. You have to hear it on a high end system with a very good components! This guy who said digital is better and that records are just nostalgic, is the one with his head up his rear!

post #51 of 54

Sounds like some guy who's stoned out of his gourd! I record the records into my hard drive CD burner so All I Have To Do is PUSH PLAY. Sometimes I enjoy looking at the record and reading the liner notes and there is a lot of good info about the artist etc. Records create an atmosphere that you will never get from those cold hard sounding dry CD's!
 

post #52 of 54

Records were made for a hundred years and most music was recorded on vinyl and bakelight. Compare that to thirty years of CD's. You just can't!

post #53 of 54
Bakelight?
I think you mean Lacquer.
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyRay View Post

Bakelight?
I think you mean Lacquer.

It's "Bakelite," but yes - you are correct.  Bakelite was a thermosetting material, similar to resin and epoxy these days - meaning that it would be a very poor choice to manufacture records because it cannot be re-formed.  On the other hand, a thermoforming material can be heated and re-formed ad nauseum.

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