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Testing audiophile claims and myths - Page 171

post #2551 of 3125

I'm sure it has a DAC. But that 1TB drive isn't going to go very far with a library of DSD files. Assuming you could even find enough to fill it.

post #2552 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

I'm sure it has a DAC. But that 1TB drive isn't going to go very far with a library of DSD files. Assuming you could even find enough to fill it.

It does have a line-out.  So it's a computer with capability to convert 32 bit audio files.

post #2553 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

Our Music Servers, which come in 1TB and 2TB capacities, offer resolution up to 32/384 kHz (as well as DSD), can be controlled wirelessly with both Apple and Android devices, play internet radio (and great music apps like Pandora and MOG) and support drag-and-drop transfer of music from your computer or NAS drive.

 

:rolleyes:

For anybody to seriously consider a music server primarily intended for high resolution files, capacity of 1TB and 2TB is hopelessly too small.

 

It is like a Ferrari with a 5 gallon tank...

post #2554 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

For anybody to seriously consider a music server primarily intended for high resolution files, capacity of 1TB and 2TB is hopelessly too small.

 

It is like a Ferrari with a 5 gallon tank...


Depends on whether people like having and ACTUALLY listening to a reasonable amount of music or boasting they have enough music to listen to something unique for 10 years before hearing anything twice.  The latter is a common affliction of audiophiles that makes little sense to me. 

post #2555 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post
 


Depends on whether people like having and ACTUALLY listening to a reasonable amount of music or boasting they have enough music to listen to something unique for 10 years before hearing anything twice.  The latter is a common affliction of audiophiles that makes little sense to me. 

Contrary to potential users of DSD and therefore storage systems of one kind or another, I am DSD regular and am recording my own masters. On average, it is a hair below 15 GB/session. Over 2TB of my own DSDs, most still made with Korg MR 1, therefore DSD64. If I were using MR 1000 from the start, that data would (almost) be doubled.

 

I have some 2.5K LPs to digitize. I find DSD128 the first digital worthy enough to undertake it. Assume playing time of an average LP to be 40 minutes, times 2500 = 100000 minutes. 11 minutes of DSD128 = 1GB .

100000 divided by 11 = 9.0909... TB

 

That without any downloads ( I find Channel Classics to be both quality and reasonably priced - but sadly only DSD64 ).

 

That amount of storage used for redbook CD would tend towards what you have described.

post #2556 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

Contrary to potential users of DSD and therefore storage systems of one kind or another, I am DSD regular and am recording my own masters. On average, it is a hair below 15 GB/session. Over 2TB of my own DSDs, most still made with Korg MR 1, therefore DSD64. If I were using MR 1000 from the start, that data would (almost) be doubled.

 

I have some 2.5K LPs to digitize. I find DSD128 the first digital worthy enough to undertake it. Assume playing time of an average LP to be 40 minutes, times 2500 = 100000 minutes. 11 minutes of DSD128 = 1GB .

100000 divided by 11 = 9.0909... TB

 

That without any downloads ( I find Channel Classics to be both quality and reasonably priced - but sadly only DSD64 ).

 

That amount of storage used for redbook CD would tend towards what you have described.


No not at all contrary.  If you listen to about 3 complete albums each day, you would not repeat one for almost 3 years.  I am pretty safe to say, you listen to little of your 2500 album list more than very, very occasionally.  A diseased way to appreciate music in my opinion.  You may listen to a track or two more often, but again, you aren't listening to much of your extensive collection very often at all.  Quite pathetic in fact. And disguised as a collection valuing quality over quantity.  Yet valuing deceptive quality as quantity. 

post #2557 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post
 


No not at all contrary.  If you listen to about 3 complete albums each day, you would not repeat one for almost 3 years.  I am pretty safe to say, you listen to little of your 2500 album list more than very, very occasionally.  A diseased way to appreciate music in my opinion.  You may listen to a track or two more often, but again, you aren't listening to much of your extensive collection very often at all.  Quite pathetic in fact. And disguised as a collection valuing quality over quantity.  Yet valuing deceptive quality as quantity. 

 

And who are you to tell people how to listen to their music exactly? Unlike your pretentious highness, some people actually like wide variety of music and won't settle for listening to 5 albums a month because it's supposedly the "best way to appreciate music". The only thing diseased is the mind that thinks it knows better how to enjoy music and gives lessons to others about it. The only thing pathetic is someone who cares so much about how others listen to their music they need to bash it openly as if their way is the only way to truly appreciate it.

 

The only thing that's clear as day is that if you have such strong opinions of how others listen to their music you must be doing something wrong yourself.

 

"Reasonable amount of music" - hah. Some people are more into listening to music than collecting a small amount of flawless recordings for bragging rights.


Edited by elmoe - 4/23/14 at 2:53am
post #2558 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post
 


No not at all contrary.  If you listen to about 3 complete albums each day, you would not repeat one for almost 3 years.  I am pretty safe to say, you listen to little of your 2500 album list more than very, very occasionally.  A diseased way to appreciate music in my opinion.  You may listen to a track or two more often, but again, you aren't listening to much of your extensive collection very often at all.  Quite pathetic in fact. And disguised as a collection valuing quality over quantity.  Yet valuing deceptive quality as quantity. 

You also can look at it this way. On average, I do listen to 2-3 complete LP albums a day.

 

I listen to some albums much more than the others, that is for sure. I have maybe less than 5 albums I never listened to - because they were acquired in larger batches of LPs and are music I am really not interested in. And then there are LP albums that are almost worn out with repeated playing. 

 

I have all but stopped acquring new albums, it has to be something really special if it is say classical work of which I already have several versions of, or a completely new "whatever". I certainly do not want to go to the collector frenzy crowd, who have incomparably more recordings, some to the point they will not live long enough to be able to listen to them all - even once. 

 

Once all digitized to DSD, it will be easier to find a particular work - couplings of classical works, although quite consistent, can have its quirks and some less frequent/obvious ones can slip under the radar of human mind. Phisically, it is possible position a record within the library at one place only; Bruch/Mendelssohn Violin concerto, as the most frequent coupling springs first to mind - under B or M ? 

 

I believe each person's desert island collection would stop at the number say around 50 . Luckily, I do not have to make that kind of decision - yet.

post #2559 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

 

And who are you to tell people how to listen to their music exactly? Unlike your pretentious highness, some people actually like wide variety of music and won't settle for listening to 5 albums a month because it's supposedly the "best way to appreciate music". The only thing diseased is the mind that thinks it knows better how to enjoy music and gives lessons to others about it. The only thing pathetic is someone who cares so much about how others listen to their music they need to bash it openly as if their way is the only way to truly appreciate it.

 

The only thing that's clear as day is that if you have such strong opinions of how others listen to their music you must be doing something wrong yourself.

 

"Reasonable amount of music" - hah. Some people are more into listening to music than collecting a small amount of flawless recordings for bragging rights.

Although I am more than just bitten by the audiophille bug, I do listen to "music" first, sound quality be damned. Just yesterday I remember going from one of the top phono cartridges ever to something incomparably more humble - because the original SQ and condition of the vinyl did really not warrant the use of that superb and by now next-to-unobtainium stylus.  I have 4 arm/cartridge combos on my main turntable and switching never takes more than say a minute.

 

And damn sure I was enjoying the voice of Teresa Berganza Rossini arias just as well - despite the German Decca pressing I was able to get is below the quality of the British one ( I am unfortunately familiar with ) ...

 

I hope everyone will eventually find the way to listen to their music as it suits best. Happy listening everyone !

post #2560 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post


Depends on whether people like having and ACTUALLY listening to a reasonable amount of music or boasting they have enough music to listen to something unique for 10 years before hearing anything twice.  The latter is a common affliction of audiophiles that makes little sense to me. 

When you have broad tastes in music and are looking to broaden them even further, there is no such thing as a "reasonable amount of music". Better to spend money on music than electronics, that's for sure!
post #2561 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post

If you listen to about 3 complete albums each day, you would not repeat one for almost 3 years.

The whole point of a music server is that they don't have to be "complete albums" any more. I rip my classical library by joining tracks into complete works. A symphony is one track. Then I put the whole library on shuffle play and stream it to stereos all over my house. Sometimes I sit down and listen carefully, controlling what I play using my iPhone. Sometimes I program it to just play Vivaldi on random shuffle at a low level as background music. If I feel like Jazz, I have a Jazz library... and a country library, and a R&B and Blues library, and a bunch of other genres. I'm surrounded by music all the time 24/7. In a week, I go through the equivalent of over 200 CDs. In a year, it would be well over 10,000... "Albums" would never be able to do that.
Edited by bigshot - 4/23/14 at 9:48am
post #2562 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

 

And who are you to tell people how to listen to their music exactly? Unlike your pretentious highness, some people actually like wide variety of music and won't settle for listening to 5 albums a month because it's supposedly the "best way to appreciate music". The only thing diseased is the mind that thinks it knows better how to enjoy music and gives lessons to others about it. The only thing pathetic is someone who cares so much about how others listen to their music they need to bash it openly as if their way is the only way to truly appreciate it.

 

The only thing that's clear as day is that if you have such strong opinions of how others listen to their music you must be doing something wrong yourself.

 

"Reasonable amount of music" - hah. Some people are more into listening to music than collecting a small amount of flawless recordings for bragging rights.


I did say it was my opinion.  Never stated it as a fact.  It is an opinion I hold having known  some people with large, large collections between 3000 and 10,000 albums.  Most poignant to me personally was a friend who I knew to love music, love good sound, and yet got into a mode of building the world's finest music collection within his abilities.  He came down with a serious illness, and I had the unfortunate experience of sitting in his listening room as he bemoaned the fact he was not going to live long enough to listen to even half of the LP's he had assembled in his collection. 

 

Now there are many ways to get too obsessed or too compulsive with any hobby you like.  Spending the cost of a house on a system to play only a few of the finest albums made, collecting more music than you can reasonably ever enjoy, collecting only things of highest quality even if that means ignoring music you do enjoy, getting tied up in quality to the point you really don't listen to music for music anymore, and so on and so forth.  Certainly one is free to proceed as they wish in the world whether I or anyone think it makes sense.  Also naturally anyone on some unhealthy path will become defensive explaining how it is their business and no one else to decide what is right for them.  And it is.  It also something others can judge as healthy or not, sensible or not, even though there is no absolute right or wrong.  Trying to learn from others, and realizing we always see the mistakes of others we can't see in ourselves, I do try and at least sometimes notice such things and alter my behavior to avoid what I consider less desirable outcomes.   It is my opinion an overly large music collection is not an optimum way to proceed.  Is that 500 albums, is that 100 albums is that 5000 albums well I have no definitive way to answer.  I also realize sometimes you have an album for only part of what is on it.  But at some point too much music is really too much as in you cannot really listen to it.  Call it pretentious if you will. 

 

Perhaps my earlier statements were too blunt and could have been stated more kindly.  No personal insult, lack of respect or judging anyone else as a lesser person was intended.  My  apologies if I did offend any of you.  It was a statement of an opinion which I hold.  Not a guideline I expect someone else to follow. Any judgment was only of the activity and not of the people themselves.


Edited by esldude - 4/23/14 at 11:11am
post #2563 of 3125

Then making do without adjectives like pathetic, diseased, or most recently pretentious and unhealthy, would do you some good. If you wish others not to feel insulted, perhaps you should begin by not insulting them.

 

As for your friend, I don't see how it was unfortunate. Perhaps his children, inheriting his large music collection, will make good use of it, or whoever else gets his hands on it. Nothing wrong with that, or are you saying that we shouldn't accumulate music we like because we're going to die someday without having listened to all of it? Who cares? At least I have the choice to pick from my extensive collection whatever I wish in the meantime.

 

I don't see how accumulating music can be considered unhealthy. I have an extremely large collection and there are only very few albums I haven't listened to (yet). Much like bigshot, music is on pretty much 24/7, and I listen to a lot more than 3 albums a day, and am glad I have plenty of to choose from. It's not about obsession or compulsion, simply whenever I come across a piece of music I like, I buy it and listen to it. I get bored of it and discard it for years, then rediscover it. There is nothing quite like this in fact, and I feel sorry for anyone too haughty to be able to have such experiences as they are, to me, some of the best things in life.

 

For the record I have a lot more than 10000 albums, and the number of which I haven't listened to is only in the 2 digits realm.

post #2564 of 3125
Someone can spend their whole life appreciating one tree, but I prefer to try to take in as much of the forest as I can. If I come down with a terminal illness, it doesn't matter if I have ten records or ten thousand, I'm still going to regret not having the time to hear all the great music there is to hear. Music is ennobling and you can't have too much of that in our modern world as far as I'm concerned.
post #2565 of 3125
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