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Testing audiophile claims and myths - Page 156

post #2326 of 3037

Haha no, if anything I wanted the Quads to sound better, but logic dictates they would sound the same and I usually tend to follow what science proves to be true, so I really was expecting to not hear a difference.

 

I don't think a small difference in dB would make that much of an audible difference like what I heard, but since you seems honestly intrigued I will borrow the receiver once more. I have a dB meter stashed somewhere, but I also have a multimeter so I'll test things out that way. No doubt, as I did it, there was most certainly a difference in dB, but I also tried the Quads at a lower volume than the Onkyo just to be sure (so a big, noticeable difference in dB, with the Onkyo turned up louder), and even at lower volumes, the Quads sounded more dynamic and more airy. That being said, I'll test things out once more with matching levels, I'll even ask my dad to come over so he can bring the receiver and adjust the level himself for a blind test while I'm at it, but considering that the Quads sound MUCH better even at a LOWER level, I don't think the results will be any different.

 

Can you recommend me a good test signal software/sound file for this? I only tested with music I am familiar with.


Edited by elmoe - 2/15/14 at 5:58am
post #2327 of 3037
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

Haha no, if anything I wanted the Quads to sound better, but logic dictates they would sound the same and I usually tend to follow what science proves to be true, so I really was expecting to not hear a difference.

 

Again, it does not matter what you want to hear, what you expect can be entirely different. Bias is sub-conscious, and it can work independently of, and even against your will. Can you successfully force yourself to ignore the optical illusion linked above, without covering parts of the image ?

post #2328 of 3037

I understand what you're saying, and I tend to agree to a certain degree anyway.

 

I will do the testing and get back to you. You'll have to give me a week or so though, before I have the time to get everything done.

post #2329 of 3037
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
Can you recommend me a good test signal software/sound file for this? I only tested with music I am familiar with.

 

Audacity (free editor) should be fine. Just generate a reasonably long signal that can be reliably measured with your equipment. For multimeters, a sine wave is recommended; some are only accurate at low frequencies (like 60 Hz), but even if you use 1 kHz and the DMM does not correctly measure it, it will still show the ratio of the two levels, which is what matters. For acoustic measurements, pink noise might be better; a simple sine wave is more sensitive to room acoustics, and moving the meter could change the level by multiple dB.

post #2330 of 3037

Yep I know Audacity well, I'll use that then, will post in here once I feel I've done this properly, might take a few tries to get anything reliable.

post #2331 of 3037
Fair play to you for bothering to do this Elmoe. I will be very interested to read what you find out.
post #2332 of 3037

How will you manage a direct A/B comparison? There shouldn't be a gap between samples. Auditory memory is very short. 1-2 seconds.

post #2333 of 3037

My SP preamp has two outputs that can be swapped through with a switch. All I need to do is set the receiver at the same dB level of the Quad amps (which don't have volume control) and then not touch the preamp volume knob. Just flipping the switch will output the signal to either the receiver or the monoblocks at the exact same dB level.

 

I will have to run two pairs of cables to the speakers simultaneously though, one from the receiver and one from the monoblocks. I am wondering if it will be safe to do this? The receiver remote control has a mute button, so if I mute then switch quickly, it should technically be doable no? If you have other ideas, I certainly welcome them.

post #2334 of 3037

That sounds like it should work. All you need is a kid to do the switching for you.

post #2335 of 3037

Yep thats no problem.

post #2336 of 3037

If you do hear a difference, try to define what it is... dynamics, frequency response, distortion, etc. If it is frequency response, see if you can correct for it using the Onkyo's tone controls. The mono block amps may have a "house sound" coloration. It isn't uncommon in amps without tone controls.

post #2337 of 3037

Lads n lasses - really - I've recorded half the stuff you're spending a gazillion quid on "stuff" to define how good it should sound - really as and when the band and I made it  - you can sometimes count in less than a grand in amps and speakers at source  - of course - and my point the room cost 100k - reading these forums Iit's all a bit emperors clothes in the dissection of the "audio" - i.e. you're reading far too much into the process - often you sometimes talk of gear that often cost more than the mix lol I know nowt I just  make the **** you're arguing about - if I have any advice I'd say **** the speakers buy a room - much cheaper ! Trust me go down the Dog n Duck in Soho on Friday and ask the drunkest bloke there he's probably the most audiophile engineer you've ever met.

post #2338 of 3037

Even if its clean sounding...the louder the volume the harder it is on your ears.  Better to have a smoother more laid back and refined presentation for loud listeners.

post #2339 of 3037

Lack of spikes in the response will make sound less fatiguing.

post #2340 of 3037
Quote:
Originally Posted by flppy ears View Post
 

go down the Dog n Duck in Soho on Friday and ask the drunkest bloke there he's probably the most audiophile engineer you've ever met.

 

But probably not the drunkest engineer I've ever met! I've met some doozies.

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