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Testing audiophile claims and myths - Page 148

post #2206 of 3125

Oh right. Cabinet resonances (which are affected by stands and coupling) are inaudible because no convincing DBT has established their audiblity.


Edited by thune - 8/27/13 at 10:11pm
post #2207 of 3125


Edited by jcx - 8/28/13 at 1:13am
post #2208 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

The main thing is that your speaker drivers need to be on the same level as your ears.

 

I'm not so sure this is the only thing that's important. Speakers should be pretty secure, and cheap stands are usually really flimsy, allowing a lot of movement of the speaker.

I had to secure the speaker stand to my desk, so that it wouldn't move as much. I did hear an increase in bass response, and mainly tightness of the bass.

Could be placebo ofcourse, but the logic behind this seems very sound. Speakers move air, speakers don't move air as they should when the speaker is moving too.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyorange View Post

Has there ever been a test of whether speaker stands make a difference in sound?  Does putting your speakers on a column of toilet paper rolls sound different from a proper lead shot weighted stand?  What about a stand weighted by water?

This is one of those audiophilic claims that actually might be true. Get the speakers as secure as possible. The heavier the speaker/monitor, the better (another benefit for active monitors). 

Not exactly scientific data, but as close as it gets probably: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E5Wh93z0eo

post #2209 of 3125
A firm cabinet mount is crucial for bass focus. My speakers came with both spikes and rubber pads. The rubber pads were on them when I brought them home. I had carpeting at the time and the speakers sounded soft and without the sharpness of presentation I heard in the showroom. I was told to swap out the feet and that took care of that.
post #2210 of 3125
Perhaps this is a problem with those dinky satellite speaker systems with plastic cabinets. I'm used to speakers made of 3/4 inch plywood. They weigh a ton. You set them on the floor and they stay set.

The only vibration related problem I've ever had is acoustic feedback from the bass coming out of the speakers reaching the turntable of my record player and making it vibrate.

...well that and making all of the walls of my listening room rattle like crazy when I crank the volume!

However, if someone is having a problem with imaging, that is almost certainly either a problem with the drivers not being pointed properly at the listening position, speakers placed too far apart, or reflections caused by room acoustics. Setting speakers on little feet won't help that.
Edited by bigshot - 8/28/13 at 9:40am
post #2211 of 3125

Afaik there are two contradicting ideas:

a) isolate the speaker from the surface it stands on so that the surface doesn't vibrate

b) couple the speaker to the surface it stands on so that the speaker doesn't vibrate as much

 

With a solid speaker stand you don't need either, to achieve a) you don't want spikes.

b) is the case if you have a soft thick carpet, like if your stands or speakers don't stand firmly on the ground.

post #2212 of 3125
The more things you set your speaker on, the more things there are to rattle and buzz. If your speakers have some heft, and your floor is solid, you don't need anything at all.
post #2213 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marleybob217 View Post

Not exactly scientific data, but as close as it gets probably: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E5Wh93z0eo

I'm too lazy to sit through 14 minutes of blabber. biggrin.gif Does the video ever show actual room measurement response graphs or waterfalls with and without the isolating platforms in place?

--Ethan
post #2214 of 3125

The video summed up:

- the speaker (cabinet) has to be rigid

- if the speakers is coupled to your desk, your desk can start vibrating and produce sound (requires a flimsy desk?)

- "isolation spikes" (an oxymoron imo) are supposed to reduce the surface area and minimize transfer of vibrations - the guy in the video says himself that he is very skeptical of that, but they are useful e.g. for floorstanding speakers on carpet to stop the speakers from rocking

- foam/isolation pads - common, nice, cheap, really do isolate

- speaker stands: best for solid footing, flexible (I don't think he mentioned height-adjustability)

 

No measurements, but he reports he could hear some differences...


Edited by xnor - 8/28/13 at 1:30pm
post #2215 of 3125

i've always found that on hardwood (my old room) that putting rubber pads (cut-up heavy floor mats) really helped the vibrations of other things in the room....in my new room (with carpet and moderate room treatment) i have no issues at all with vibrations of either the speakers or any surface around

 

by far the biggest difference i've ever made in the hi-fi world was treating and properly arranging my room, even more of a jump in quality then when i went to nice speakers

 

as far as mounting the speakers on stands...i've always been old school in that if the speakers can sit on little stands, they aren't big enough to be useful speakers.  not very objective i know, but it's worked for me 

post #2216 of 3125

post #2217 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marleybob217 View Post

 

I'm not so sure this is the only thing that's important. Speakers should be pretty secure, and cheap stands are usually really flimsy, allowing a lot of movement of the speaker.

I had to secure the speaker stand to my desk, so that it wouldn't move as much. I did hear an increase in bass response, and mainly tightness of the bass.

Could be placebo ofcourse, but the logic behind this seems very sound. Speakers move air, speakers don't move air as they should when the speaker is moving too.

 

This is one of those audiophilic claims that actually might be true. Get the speakers as secure as possible. The heavier the speaker/monitor, the better (another benefit for active monitors). 

Not exactly scientific data, but as close as it gets probably: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E5Wh93z0eo

 

This is my current setup.  The bass is pretty boomy I have to admit.  I've looked all over my room and can't find anything else suitable as a speaker stand of that height.  

 

post #2218 of 3125

Try moving it as far from the wall as possible on your desk and see if it improves. You may also want to cut off anything below 60hz to clear it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyorange View Post

 

This is my current setup.  The bass is pretty boomy I have to admit.  I've looked all over my room and can't find anything else suitable as a speaker stand of that height.  

 

post #2219 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post

Try moving it as far from the wall as possible on your desk and see if it improves. You may also want to cut off anything below 60hz to clear it up.

Do you know what the "Full-range speakers" option in the windows speaker config does?  I know it's a high pass filter of some sort but I'm wondering if anyone knows what frequencies it works at.  I can hear a difference by turning it on and off (the effect is instant), but turning it off doesn't seem to make the bass less boomy, it just seems to take away the deepest bass.

post #2220 of 3125
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyorange View Post

Do you know what the "Full-range speakers" option in the windows speaker config does?  I know it's a high pass filter of some sort but I'm wondering if anyone knows what frequencies it works at.  I can hear a difference by turning it on and off (the effect is instant), but turning it off doesn't seem to make the bass less boomy, it just seems to take away the deepest bass.

While i dont know the exact details of the setting, most of those types of "full range" options will cut off at 80hz, allowing satellites to do their job, and the rest for the subwoofer.

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