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Testing audiophile claims and myths - Page 123

post #1831 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yahzi View Post

 

Well if you are comparing two speakers in an apples to apples way ... in a sighted test, the best you can do is try to level match the volume between both. With a stereo set up, how would one go about doing this?

 

SPL meter or other calibrated microphone (with some way to analyze the input), test tones to use as a benchmark for volume, and multiple identical amplifiers (or an accurate repeatable way to attenuate the signal when needed).


Edited by liamstrain - 2/5/13 at 10:39pm
post #1832 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by p a t r i c k View Post

 

I recommend you get hold of F Alton Everest's Master Handbook of Acoustics.

 

That has been on my bookshelf since the Second Edition.

 

And I can't recall any instance where it was ever recommended to manage reflections by using REFLECTORS. Diffusion and absorption, yes. And even varying degrees of absorption to suit one's tastes. But not reflectors.

 

Keep in mind that this is what you wrote that I was responding to:

 

Quote:
To manage those reflections you can use reflective panels in the centre of the walls and in the centre of the ceiling.

 

se

post #1833 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

 

That has been on my bookshelf since the Second Edition.

 

And I can't recall any instance where it was ever recommended to manage reflections by using REFLECTORS. Diffusion and absorption, yes. And even varying degrees of absorption to suit one's tastes. But not reflectors.

 

Keep in mind that this is what you wrote that I was responding to:

 

 

se

  +1, Steve.  He must have the terminology messed up.

post #1834 of 3676

Correct me but if I have a 200 ch x 7 power amp and I bi-amp, you are not sending 200 watts to the lows and 200 watts to the highs because of the passive crossover elements?

post #1835 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesHuntington View Post

This info proves a lot about the hype behind spending money VS. a professional setup. Bose sound awesome in a Bose Studio. Dre Beats sound better in the store plugged into their amp with their music. My favorite setup right now is a 1992 JVC CDP with the on board PEM and some 1981 Yamaha YH-100 headphones hooked into the front jack. Total cost off the street is 200 or less, but you could use some newer studio headphones with similar results. My Pinnacle loud speakers sound like expensive speakers, and that was the idea behind their design. All this study proves to me is that a system should be set up by a professional, or you may not get what you pay for.
post #1836 of 3676
I caught a Bose rep jacked the bass and the treble in the 5.1 system in my store to the max instead using the calibration microphone. He also install a pre-recorded flash drive for that inflated " powerful" demo.

I do not hate Bose just the way they set up to demo their products. Comsumers take it home it will not sound the same. How would you like to take a heat from an angry customer since his $1, 499.99 sound bar sounds flat and much less dynamic as the one on demo? An exchange for another $1, 499.99 sound bar will not solve the problem but the customer insists the one he bought is defective !!!
Edited by ACDOAN - 2/7/13 at 4:18am
post #1837 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yahzi View Post

Correct me but if I have a 200 ch x 7 power amp and I bi-amp, you are not sending 200 watts to the lows and 200 watts to the highs because of the passive crossover elements?

A crossover of any kind, passive or active, prevents inappropriate frequency energy from hitting the drivers.  It will also compensate for differing driver efficiencies. So there will be a different maximum power to each driver.  

 

Not sure how you plan to bi-amp a speaker with a passive crossover unless provisions have been made for that.  Otherwise you have to take the crossover apart. 

post #1838 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACDOAN View Post

I caught a Bose rep jacked the bass and the treble in the 5.1 system in my store to the max instead using the calibration microphone. He also install a pre-recorded flash drive for that inflated " powerful" demo.

 

Every stereo store salesman does that. People may think their particular stereo salesman would never do that, but all that means is that he's sneaky and really good at adjusting the bass and treble knobs with his back turned to the unit. I saw a guy do this once. He had a big friendly grin on his face and his hands were behind his back casually. All of a sudden I noticed his sleeve moving and I looked behind him and he was dialing up the bass. When I called him on it, the big grin disappeared and he stopped talking to me.

post #1839 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

Every stereo store salesman does that. People may think their particular stereo salesman would never do that, but all that means is that he's sneaky and really good at adjusting the bass and treble knobs with his back turned to the unit. I saw a guy do this once. He had a big friendly grin on his face and his hands were behind his back casually. All of a sudden I noticed his sleeve moving and I looked behind him and he was dialing up the bass. When I called him on it, the big grin disappeared and he stopped talking to me.

 

Really good ones manipulate the controls knobs by clenching them between their buttocks. Which is why should only take a demo unit unless it's a really great deal!

post #1840 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuttle View Post

 

Really good ones manipulate the controls knobs by clenching them between their buttocks.

 

Never buy floor models.

post #1841 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

Every stereo store salesman does that. People may think their particular stereo salesman would never do that, but all that means is that he's sneaky and really good at adjusting the bass and treble knobs with his back turned to the unit. I saw a guy do this once. He had a big friendly grin on his face and his hands were behind his back casually. All of a sudden I noticed his sleeve moving and I looked behind him and he was dialing up the bass. When I called him on it, the big grin disappeared and he stopped talking to me.

 Most better shops sell kit that don't even have tone controls, don't use switch boxes etc. Of course that will now be a scam as well. You know, giving you less and telling you those are a bad thing. Lordy Lordy preach on. Your game is actually better than those you admonish. Why would anyone turn up the bass and make it sound crappier to try and sell something. If that actually worked, it's probably good enough for who it for. Bose probably needs all the help it can get so maybe that's an exception. LOL The idea that you can hear anything in a big box store that sells Bose is a joke anyway.


Edited by goodvibes - 2/7/13 at 9:34pm
post #1842 of 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodvibes View Post

 Most better shops sell kit that don't even have tone controls, don't use switch boxes etc. Of course that will now be a scam as well. You know, giving you less and telling you those are a bad thing. Lordy Lordy preach on. Your game is actually better than those you admonish. Why would anyone turn up the bass and make it sound crappier to try and sell something. If that actually worked, it's probably good enough for who it for. Bose probably needs all the help it can get so maybe that's an exception. LOL The idea that you can hear anything in a big box store that sells Bose is a joke anyway.

The one thing Bose systems don't need is more bass.  They don't have a lot of bass adjustment, and usually they need less.  A lot less.  

 

Best Buy often has a "Magnolia Home Theater" demo room where you could possibly hear something, but the staff is highly under qualified and stuff often isn't set up right at all.  

 

If someone is actually auditioning Bose, they've probably already drank the cool-aid.  If anything, those systems are what should be clenched. Bose are Masters of marketing.  Absolute masters.  I'm in awe. Unique products, highly proprietary, simple concepts, inventive engineering, high cost, sub-average results.   People who own them continue to love them too, owning them for many years.  Simply amazing.  

 

A friend recently showed us their Bose system and proudly stated they loaded all their CDs into it, then threw the discs away.   Oh, and they've never done and don't know how to do a backup. Talk about drinking the cool-aid!

post #1843 of 3676

It's bliss.biggrin.gif

post #1844 of 3676
BB/ Magnolia stores in my area carry much better lines now .I saw a B &W 804 and some MacIntosh tubepre/amp with the Logan. Nice system but I wonder why would any Magnolia salesman display the Logan/MacIntosh system right by the entrance to their Magnolia section? Being a quasi-dipolar,the Logans are very picky about placement and they display them where all the noise in the store interferes with the music from the system. I guess their thinking is "look at us ,we now have MacIntosh and Logans". Big money at a very wrong place.
post #1845 of 3676

just to steer this thread a little askew- does anyone hear a difference between FLAC and WAV? I used to think I heard a difference between AIFF and WAV. Audiophiles are funny beings. But I guess faith is a powerful force.

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