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Very interesting thing I've found out about the RSA Protector - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post
Ive heard the same thing, also the same thing happens with the pico slim, though the volume doesnt need to be as loud on the slim to be able to hear it. It just means that your source is powerful enough to "push" its way all the way through the amp. Its much easier for me to hear it using my dac19 at home, as compared to running them from a LOD on my iPod classic
Probably because these are all inverting op-amp designs so there is always a resistive path from the input to output connectors

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post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by nc8000 View Post
The best example of capacitor draining I've heard was the Xin Reference with it's 2 huge caps. It would play fully normal up to 30-45 seconds after being turned off with some phones
Quote:
Originally Posted by midoo1990 View Post
i did a week ago some experiments in the physics labs on how long a cap can hold charge and some of the caps took 5 minutes to drain all the charge.also one of my friends tested this on a very bad quality cap and it hold charge for 15 minutes,so ya maybe thats the reason although i definetly dont know.
yeah with the added info it's clear it has nothing to do with the caps discharging. but these 2 examples above are nothing, batteries are themselves a type of capacitor, it doesnt have to be a bad quality cap for this sort of thing, in fact there is a new breed of supercapacitors that have been developed for short term high current applications, like defibrillators and other portable devices. in fact these are very high quality capacitors in many instances, just very large capacity

Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfen68 View Post
If I recall correctly, my old Corda 2Move would allow some signal through even when powered down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by justin w. View Post
Probably because these are all inverting op-amp designs so there is always a resistive path from the input to output connectors

[im]htt://www.electronics-radio.com/articles/analogue_circuits/operational-amplifier-op-amp/op-amp_basic_inv.gif[/img]
yep, well illustrated Justin, exactly what I was saying, but put forth in a much more concise manner
post #18 of 27
^^as I said I don't know.I was just replying to the two posts above me that mentioned capacitors.I am still a freshman in Enginerring and when I take electric engineering as my major,maybe I will challenge your posts
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by midoo1990 View Post

^^as I said I don't know.I was just replying to the two posts above me that mentioned capacitors.I am still a freshman in Enginerring and when I take electric engineering as my major,maybe I will challenge your posts


hehe, I wasnt correcting or challenging you mate, was just adding info and I missed my main point I meant to make too. they (supercapacitors) are often used in the field as kinda short term, high current batteries. there are capacitors of all sorts, for all manner of applications, some like bypass caps are designed for small capacity and speed. Once you are an engineer i'm sure there will be plenty you will challenge and I welcome it, you will have to unlearn a few things if you want to maintain an interest in high end audio. engineers dont have all the answers either and will tend to hit brick walls in some fields more often because of working within such rigid limits. IMO its wise to live in both spheres, without ignoring one or the other.


Edited by qusp - 5/6/10 at 2:25am
post #20 of 27

I just realized, the signal you're hearing probably goes through the ground connection.


Edited by semisight - 5/6/10 at 2:04am
post #21 of 27

no it doesnt; as has been covered, it goes through the signal path because the circuit uses an inverting feedback loop; so there is a path (through a small resistor) that bypasses the opamp, which would normally be a closed switch at this point. the return path, as usual is on the ground


Edited by qusp - 5/6/10 at 2:30am
post #22 of 27

Are you sure? That would only hold true if the amp used inverting feedback all the way through; amps like the pa2v2 and cmoy (admittedly simple) don't have inverting feedback, and if there are any voltage followers anywhere in the design that would kill the signal. Also, I'm sure the input resistors are above the resistance at which audio could easily pass through. I just don't see it working like that frown.

 

Are there any schematics available? Probably not, but it doesn't hurt to ask.

post #23 of 27

for this OP example....ermm.... the protector doesnt actually have a ground path to the headphones, it has bridged/balanced output. 


Edited by qusp - 5/10/10 at 3:10am
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 

So much information, mail

post #25 of 27
And so much attitude
post #26 of 27

:redface:

I really need to stop coming on here at the end of a long long day. the attitude above was unnecessary, I agree. wasnt actually meaning to sound like that, but was a very frustrating day. I guess it shows


Edited by qusp - 5/10/10 at 2:51am
post #27 of 27

I've experienced this with many amps.  Just make sure you don't flick on the power switch with volume still at max!
 

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