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The Exploration of Metal and Progressive Rock - Page 33

post #481 of 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deep Funk View Post

 The late sixties and early seventies have brought forth very interesting music. 



Good drugs can do that.  biggrin.gif

post #482 of 659
Thread Starter 

King Crimson's "Islands" is now playing. In a way this album sounds less complicated than "Lizard" but slightly louder although slower and groovier. "Prelude: Song Of The Gulls" sounds almost to pretty to be included on a King Crimson album. "Islands" has just begun. I will continue writing as the track is playing. 

 

"In The Court Of The Crimson King"

-Timeless in a strange way and revolutionary still. Very rich album...

"In The Wake Of Poseidon"

- As much as it seems to resemble "ITCOTCK" it sounds different and just as rich. I like it just as much as its predecessor. 

"Lizard"

- More Jazz, yet the King Crimson sound is still there in full effect in a more subtle way. 

"Islands"

- Less Jazz, more of everything else in that time. It still has a richness but the King Crimson sound from the previous albums, its intensity is scarce and the stand out track does not sound as I expected from King Crimson: a beautiful chamber piece. Thankfully the sound quality of my CD is good, I pressed replay for the chamber piece which is so lovely. I can only think of one thing, they either tried something else or they went for pretty, less grim and less complicated pieces. "Ladies Of The Road" is still a nice track thankfully. On the merits of the instrumentals and the pretty pieces this is still a decent album. I just miss the less than pretty and intense sound which is more often to be found on the previous albums. 

 

Set up: CD690 + K240 DF 

post #483 of 659

Any fans of Corelia? Glass Faces is an awesome song... http://www.corelliaband.com/

post #484 of 659
Thread Starter 

Corelia, well "Aviation" sounded nice and "Glass Face" sounds even better. "Glass Face" sounds fun in a complicated way, very likeable. 

post #485 of 659
An interesting album in the context of this thread is Yes's "Drama". Made by a one-off line-up that was most notable for not including singer Jon Anderson, it's Yes's heaviest album for sure, and is infinitely more Prog than the much more popular 90125 that followed it several years later. But it's a really great record. Fans of both Prog and Metal should listen to "Machine Massiah" from Drama as soon as is practical biggrin.gif
Edited by Skylab - 11/23/10 at 6:49pm
post #486 of 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post

An interesting album in the context of this thread is Yes's "Drama". Made by a one-off line-up that was most notable for not including singer Jon Anderson, it's Yes's heaviest album for sure, and is infinitely more Prog than the much more popular 90125 that followed it several years later. But it's a really great record. Fans of both Prog and Metal should listen to "Machine Massiah" from Drama as soon as is practical biggrin.gif


Trevor Horn does a pretty good job of sounding similar to Jon Anderson. This album doesn't flow quite as well as more classic Yes pieces or even the later stuff, but it definitely has some good sounds. Machine Messiah is a cool song for sure, very heavy, kinda makes me think of Uriah Heep. 

post #487 of 659
Thread Starter 

Right, to torture the bleeding wallet once more or to not torture the bleeding wallet once more?

 

Rush is on the list, King Crimson, Mastodon, Overkill, Procol Harum, Gentle Giant, The Nice... (No particular order.) Finally some mentioning of Uriah Heep influence though, that band had great moments in both 'progressive' and 'pop/rock' sound. The first line up with Dave Byron made some epic tracks. 

 

Drama by Yes, I might pick it up...


Edited by Deep Funk - 11/23/10 at 9:54pm
post #488 of 659

Nazareth's "Hair Of The Dog" contains stylistic elements, that basically became the archetypal early metal sound.

post #489 of 659
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

Nazareth's "Hair Of The Dog" contains stylistic elements, that basically became the archetypal early metal sound.

The album is in, I will give it a good listen.

 

I also picked up Procol Harum's début album "Procol Harum". It is good. "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" and "Homburg" are also included on my 2009 release. I can be short about this album. This band sounds way ahead of its time in the way it mixes Pop with Rock with Classical influences. Even better, Procol Harum was very early, 1968 was the year of release for this album. The tracks intertwined with organ and piano sound really special. This band mastered the balance act in combining their influences very well.

 

Set up: CD690 + SA-530 + K240 DF

 

P.S. "Repent Walpurgis" is now playing, I can only place it on equal level with "Take A Pebble" by EL&P, "April" by Deep Purple and some other recent high lights. And while I am in the mood for some more audible beauty, David Bowie's "A New Career In A New Town" is next. There is something about "Low" still impacts my mind and the aforementioned track high lights that in some manner... Enough writing for now 
 


Edited by Deep Funk - 11/29/10 at 3:52pm
post #490 of 659
Thread Starter 

I gave Nazareth's "Hair Of The Dog" a good listen. The album is quite good. I have the 2010 re-release with bonus tracks.

 

I hear the stylistic albums: heavy drumming, prominent riffs, heavy bass (also a 70'ties thing though), influences from Blues and Country. 

 

About the album and its sound, the vocalist reminds me of Axl Rose the the instrumentals... Well the instrumentals are both typical and interesting. Nazareth had a very distinctive approach with roots in Country and Blues. "Rose Is In The Water" and the intro and actually the entire track "Please Don't Judas Me" showcase this. The attention to the atmosphere of these tracks is special as are the Gospel/Spiritual sensations I get when the choirs step in on "Guilty". For a loud early Metal/proto Metal album I have to admit this album is quite diverse on the merits of how the 'softer tracks' are put together. 

 

Even so, "Hair Of The Dog, Miss Misery" and "Changing Times" despite not being the fastest paced tracks still get you you moving. In the CD booklet I read Nazareth tried to do a Led Zeppelin (CD booklets, I love those things.) and I cannot disagree but despite the loudness and rawness These guys do not sound like rip offs. "Changin'Times" reminds me more of Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin with great guitar meanderings backed by that lovely 70'ties bass, extra heavy... Dan McCafferty's shouty voice and growl are impressive, especially that growl (Axl Rose!). I could write more but I want to go to sleep... In short, this album is fun and original despite the influences you can hear with ease. I can easily see how Nazareth influenced bands like Iron Maiden and even Guns'N'Roses or even Jack White... 

 

Set up: CD690 + SA-530 + K240 DF

post #491 of 659
My favorite track on Hair of the Dog is "Please Don't Judas Me".
post #492 of 659
Thread Starter 

Deep Purple's "Fireball" 25th Anniversary Edition...

1. Fireball: speed, speed, speed and Ian Paice really shines here. There is also an instrumental version of this among the included bonus tracks. The drumming almost enters the realm of jazz drumming in my opinion and yes I have a thing for drumming and percussion.

2. No No No: slow, a protest song Deep Purple style. 

3. Demon's Eye: slightly faster bluesy rocker and I love the organ accents.

4. Anyone's Daughter: deceptive intro, transition follows to a country like track with very amusing lyrics, Ian Gillian sounds so good and the piano really adds to the track. 

5. The Mule: piece de résistance, almost pure fun and experimentation with mostly brilliant drumming by Ian Paice with brilliant instrumental contributions by the others. 

6. Fools: deceptive intro again, Uriah Heep like actually until the heavy part sets in, very interesting lyrics and Ian Gillian sounds very good again. Dry drum breaks set in and I hear a moog(?) over an almost too groovy rhythm section. This sounds almost Yes-like until the heavy part sets in again, Ian Gillian growls again and the John Lord adds the heavy organ notes give this track an epic ending. 

7. No One Came: back to R&B, rock with a heavy groove and break beats with lyrics about fame and friendships, "Man Your Music Is Really Funky". A bit of Hendrix or I am wrong?

8. Strange Kind Of Woman a-side remix 96: formerly known as "Prostitute", mid-tempo rocker with a good hook, heavy groove and very danceable. He is doing the David Byron thingbiggrin.gif.

 

First, Ian Paice knows how to pummel his way through this varied album. Second, I love the organ intertwining with the bass and guitars while the organ solos are impressive too. Third the overall sound of this album is dense and dynamic. The vocals, guitars and bass are impressive too by the way. The bonus material is really fun and interesting. "I'm Alone b-side" has a very catchy intro and sounds more like Deep Purple mark I for instance. 

 

Conclusion: this album is so much fun. The variety is there in abundance and even when listening critically I cannot help enjoying myself. That written I should stop thinking about this album before I give it another spin. If anything I had more fun with this album than with "In Rock" or "Machine Head". There is something special about this album...

 

Set up: CD690 + SA-530 + K240 DF (Treble on the SA-530 is set on +2 out of 5, bass and balance remain neutral. The extra treble gives a more detailed and vivid presentation.)


Edited by Deep Funk - 12/4/10 at 4:09pm
post #493 of 659

For metal, look into a band called Alestorm, sounds retarded I know but my god listening to them is just so fun!!!

post #494 of 659

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deep Funk View Post

Right, to torture the bleeding wallet once more or to not torture the bleeding wallet once more?

 

Rush is on the list, King Crimson, Mastodon, Overkill, Procol Harum, Gentle Giant, The Nice... (No particular order.) Finally some mentioning of Uriah Heep influence though, that band had great moments in both 'progressive' and 'pop/rock' sound. The first line up with Dave Byron made some epic tracks. 

 

Drama by Yes, I might pick it up...

Overkill Years Of Decay is a must have.

 

If you spot a used Taking Over that's a great out of print album.

 

A more modern Overkill album like From The Underground and Below,Necroshine,and Killing Kind are good.

And Horrorscope is a other fairly early good Overkill album.

 

 

 

Mastodon that band seems really popular I got one of their albums and absolutely HATED it. I must be missing something.

 

 

 

 

Deep Purple Fireball is a good one sometimes people act like DP only has 2 albums In Rock and Machine Head.

 

Deep Funk you really seem to like the 70's era.(can't blame ya L3000.gif)

I'm sure you have a million albums you want to buy already.

But have you considered

 

Blue Oyster Cult,Scorpions 70's material,Thin Lizzy, and more 70's Judas Priest ?

 

 


Edited by mibutenma - 12/5/10 at 6:57pm
post #495 of 659
Thread Starter 

The sixties and seventies are my favourite period of music speaking of Pop and Rock plus everything in between. In those days the music of today was invented, at least that is what I am thinking. 

 

I will pick up "Years Of Decay" and slowly add more... This 'exploration' will not end soon.

 

Regarding Deep Puple, the mark I line up was really remarkable for its more balanced and progressive approach to making music. "Fireball" still has some of these trademarks be it more funwink.gif .


Edited by Deep Funk - 12/6/10 at 1:18am
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