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Best headphones for $200? - Page 3

post #31 of 38
I definitely don't think the ad h2000 sounds bad. They are a little bassier than say the hd600's but I do not find it to be uncontrolled.

The ah d2000's aren't that great of sound isolators because they have their "acoustic optimizer" which is a little gap between the back of the headphone and the middle ring that lets air pressure (sound waves) out. They do this because according to denon it equalizes the pressure in front and behind the driver.
post #32 of 38
I've been giving my newly acquired SRH840's a run through for the last few days. I really wanted to like these headphones but so far I would have to agree that these are pretty flat and uninvolving. They simply aren't very musical.

To be fair though, Shure doesn't label the 840's as a consumer hifi headphone. On the box, they are clearly labeled as "professional studio monitors" and are "optimized for critical listening" and that is exactly what I believe they would excel at. These are designed to be used as a production tool, they are marketed as such and in a studio is where I think they belong. I could never in good conscience recommend the SRH840's for everyday music listening.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Tasty View Post
I've been giving my newly acquired SRH840's a run through for the last few days. I really wanted to like these headphones but so far I would have to agree that these are pretty flat and uninvolving. They simply aren't very musical.

To be fair though, Shure doesn't label the 840's as a consumer hifi headphone. On the box, they are clearly labeled as "professional studio monitors" and are "optimized for critical listening" and that is exactly what I believe they would excel at. These are designed to be used as a production tool, they are marketed as such and in a studio is where I think they belong. I could never in good conscious recommend the SRH840's for everyday music listening.
Zowie! Very well put.
But of course... that's why I like them.
post #34 of 38
Believe me, I really really wanted to like them as well. I've read the countless threads and first hand impressions and I was really hoping that the 840's would have been a nice change of pace from my Grado's.

Sometimes though you just have to take things for what they are. Shure set out to make a great set of studio monitors and that's exactly what they are. Balanced, analytical, and detailed. No more, no less.

It's funny. While listening to them, I kept thinking to myself, okay, i'm hearing good mids, good clean extension for the lows, and nice highs.. now give me a little something more!. Show me a little bit of personality! But the SRH840's being the true "professionals" that they are simply held back and kept things business as usual... I know this much, if Shure ever decides to make a set of full sized headphones tuned for a more musical, consumer hifi type of presentaion, I will be right there to give them a listen.
post #35 of 38
Im not a fan of monitoring headphones, but since i got them im loving them. The bass is quite deep and treble is very balanced. I improved it with my headamp...They are good closed and neutral headphones.
post #36 of 38
Ultrasone HiFi 580,680...
post #37 of 38
I always remember people saying the SRH-840 are totally flat and neutral headphones. Whenever I heard that i'm like "Huh?"! After hearing the HD-600 (which I love) I can now understand this more.

I came from the Triple Fi 10, so when I upgraded to the SRH-840 (not an upgrade really, just to a headphone and not IEM) I felt like they had a bit more bass. Strangely enough when I put back in my Triple Fi 10 I noticed they actually had what seemed like way MORE bass then the SRH-840! My ears must be playing tricks on me.

I love the sound out of the SRH-840, but it isn't for everyone. I'm the completely opposite. I find the music out of the SRH-840 fun and I can really get into the music, maybe not as much as the HD-600. I thought the 840 had a lot of bass until I heard the HD-600. Then of course I hear from other people that the HD-600 has NO bass. What?!

I haven't used my SRH-840 in about two weeks and listening to them again after my HD-600 just felt so different. They still sounded good. I'm keeping both the SRH-840 and HD-600 for sure. Has anyone else found something that sounds better then the SRH-840 for under $200? I haven't. Not even under $250, but I didn't like the Denon D2000. Too bad the Sennheiser HD-600 are so expensive, but so far they have been worth it. I even upgrade the cable to the HD-650 version for just $12. Some people said it's just thicker plastic, but the cable itself is thicker. So far I couldn't even force myself to buy a $200 upgrade cable. Maybe someday.
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post
I always remember people saying the SRH-840 are totally flat and neutral headphones. Whenever I heard that i'm like "Huh?"! After hearing the HD-600 (which I love) I can now understand this more.

I came from the Triple Fi 10, so when I upgraded to the SRH-840 (not an upgrade really, just to a headphone and not IEM) I felt like they had a bit more bass. Strangely enough when I put back in my Triple Fi 10 I noticed they actually had what seemed like way MORE bass then the SRH-840! My ears must be playing tricks on me.

I love the sound out of the SRH-840, but it isn't for everyone. I'm the completely opposite. I find the music out of the SRH-840 fun and I can really get into the music, maybe not as much as the HD-600. I thought the 840 had a lot of bass until I heard the HD-600. Then of course I hear from other people that the HD-600 has NO bass. What?!

I haven't used my SRH-840 in about two weeks and listening to them again after my HD-600 just felt so different. They still sounded good. I'm keeping both the SRH-840 and HD-600 for sure. Has anyone else found something that sounds better then the SRH-840 for under $200? I haven't. Not even under $250, but I didn't like the Denon D2000. Too bad the Sennheiser HD-600 are so expensive, but so far they have been worth it. I even upgrade the cable to the HD-650 version for just $12. Some people said it's just thicker plastic, but the cable itself is thicker. So far I couldn't even force myself to buy a $200 upgrade cable. Maybe someday.

You are so right. So much of this is a matter of time and comparison.
I'll listen to the HD600's and think, "These are the BEST".
Then I'll listen to the M50 for a while and when I put the HD600 back on I'll think, "Hmm... what happened to the bass".
Then after listening to my SRH840, I'll think, "Wow, these are much more open and revealing than the...".

And back and forth and back and forth, each one with its own emphasis and de-emphasis. Yeah, I think the SRH840 is a great closed-back can. I'm keeping it for editing and analysis. I'll also keep the M50 for shear rocking fun.

The two provide completely different takes on sound / music, and are both excellent for their intended purpose. Not being singular in my purpose, I can’t be singular in my HP ownership… unfortunately (for my wallet).

And to stay more completely on topic, these both are great sub- $200 cans.

shane
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