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Why does loud sound cause fog?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Can some explain to me why fog forms at 172dB (according to this)? I already tried googling but couldn't find any results.
post #2 of 16
Edit: forget it, lolz
post #3 of 16
I'm guessing it's because the sound pressure is so high that it translates into literal atmospheric gas pressure, and when you increase the pressure of the atmosphere, one of the first things to go is water, which would drop out as liquid water.
post #4 of 16
This explains why my nose runs when I turn my music up.
post #5 of 16
I think this is a similar phenomenon:

Stunning Photo Of Jet Breaking Sound Barrier

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MD1032 View Post
I'm guessing it's because the sound pressure is so high that it translates into literal atmospheric gas pressure, and when you increase the pressure of the atmosphere, one of the first things to go is water, which would drop out as liquid water.
You're right on with this. The sound is literally pressure changes and when at such high levels, it pressurizes the local air and vapor forms.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by beerguy0 View Post
I think this is a similar phenomenon:

Stunning Photo Of Jet Breaking Sound Barrier

This is plainly awesome.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrtby123 View Post
You're right on with this. The sound is literally pressure changes and when at such high levels, it pressurizes the local air and vapor forms.
So if you set up a nice standing wave in a humid room and turned up the volume, you'd see a distribution of water vapor centered around the crest of the wave? I've never heard of this phenomenon before...this is cool.
post #9 of 16
No wonder there is steam coming out of my ears when I take the headphones off......
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALBPM View Post
No wonder there is steam coming out of my ears when I take the headphones off......
I think thats just plain hot air j/k
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MD1032 View Post
So if you set up a nice standing wave in a humid room and turned up the volume, you'd see a distribution of water vapor centered around the crest of the wave? I've never heard of this phenomenon before...this is cool.
You would probably need VERY high pressures to do it.

Large vortex cannons can do it
fun youtube video
post #12 of 16
my butt is a large vortex cannon
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by beerguy0 View Post
I think this is a similar phenomenon:

Stunning Photo Of Jet Breaking Sound Barrier

[IMG]Beautiful Picture[/IMG]
This picture is in the physics textbook I had last year, and my friends and I decided that it was a plane coming out of hyperspace.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by beerguy0 View Post
I think this is a similar phenomenon:

Stunning Photo Of Jet Breaking Sound Barrier

<snip>
OH YEAHHH
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MD1032 View Post
So if you set up a nice standing wave in a humid room and turned up the volume, you'd see a distribution of water vapor centered around the crest of the wave? I've never heard of this phenomenon before...this is cool.
It'd kinda be like this

+ YouTube Video
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