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Keyboard-Fi - Page 88

post #1306 of 1607

A lot of nice looking keyboards here!

 

Mine's nothing special; I just like a minimalistic look. Ducky Shine with blank white PBT keycaps.

 

 

Just realised that my num-lock is off lol

post #1307 of 1607

MX Blue, MX Green and MX White all have a separate slider component of the stem that when pushed past the actuator point it makes contact with the bottom of the stem, which gives an audible click before the rest of the stem bottoms out:

 

 

Every switch can be bottomed out...what he was saying is that if you can touch type, linear switches can be very quiet in comparison.  I use linear switches and some soft o-rings under every keycap to further dampen sound and make bottoming out softer when that happens.  That said, every switch when returning to the default position makes a noise as stem makes contact with the top of the housing.  This is still quieter than bottoming out, which is still quieter than the click made from switches with sliders.  The audible click from these switch types offers a confirmation that the switch has been activated for touch typists, so it's mostly about preference and if you need that confirmation or not.  

 

It's similar to how a buckling spring switch works in that when depressed, the spring is propelled into the switch housing at the same time as the actuation is made.  When you hear the click, you know the switch was activated.

 


Edited by modulor - 9/29/13 at 12:02pm
post #1308 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by modulor View Post
 

MX Blue, MX Green and MX Clear all have a separate slider component of the stem that when pushed past the actuator point it makes contact with the bottom of the stem, which gives an audible click before the rest of the stem bottoms out:

 

 

Every switch can be bottomed out...what he was saying is that if you can touch type, linear switches can be very quiet in comparison.  I use linear switches and some soft o-rings under every keycap to further dampen sound and make bottoming out softer when that happens.  That said, every switch when returning to the default position makes a noise as stem makes contact with the top of the housing.  This is still quieter than bottoming out, which is still quieter than the click made from switches with sliders.  The audible click from these switch types offers a confirmation that the switch has been activated for touch typists, so it's mostly about preference and if you need that confirmation or not.  

 

It's similar to how a buckling spring switch works in that when depressed, the spring is propelled into the switch housing at the same time as the actuation is made.  When you hear the click, you know the switch was activated.

 

 

Wrong, clears are stiff Browns, you are thinking MX Whites, which are 80 gram soft clicky.

post #1309 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxid10t View Post
 

 

Wrong, clears are stiff Browns, you are thinking MX Whites, which are 80 gram soft clicky.

 

Correct, I updated my post....a bit rusty from my GeekHack/Deskthority days :(


Edited by modulor - 9/29/13 at 12:03pm
post #1310 of 1607

I currently have a Filco tenkeyless Majestouch 2 w/brown switches. I had the same w/red switches, but it had the tenkey pad. I liked the tactile feel of the reds a little more, but tenkeyless is ideal to me, for gaming.

post #1311 of 1607

uhhhhh wait reds aren't tactile they're linear ._.

post #1312 of 1607

It may not be a tactile switch, but the context in which tactile is used can also mean the type of feedback that the fingers receive to let the fingers know the switch has engaged...and there are soft tactile red switches. They aren't all linear.

post #1313 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by elbastardo View Post
 

It may not be a tactile switch, but the context in which tactile is used can also mean the type of feedback that the fingers receive to let the fingers know the switch has engaged...and there are soft tactile red switches. They aren't all linear.

 

My life is a lie

post #1314 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by elbastardo View Post
 

It may not be a tactile switch, but the context in which tactile is used can also mean the type of feedback that the fingers receive to let the fingers know the switch has engaged...and there are soft tactile red switches. They aren't all linear.

 

I've absolutely never heard of this.  Brown is the tactile alternative to reds (using the same springs.)  Do you have a link?

post #1315 of 1607

Finally found it, but it was a page on cherry switches from deck keyboards that I read wrong. My apologies. 

post #1316 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by elbastardo View Post
 

Finally found it, but it was a page on cherry switches from deck keyboards that I read wrong. My apologies. 

 

Not a lie afterall, phew

post #1317 of 1607

I have got to say even to write I prefer reds. Blues are not my thing.

post #1318 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0str3ss View Post
 

I have got to say even to write I prefer reds. Blues are not my thing.

 

Well yeah, everyone has got preference, guess you prefer not to have feedback.. Blues are my favourite MXes!

post #1319 of 1607

You just gotta love that linear feel.

post #1320 of 1607
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0str3ss View Post
 

You just gotta love that linear feel.

 

Clicky, feedback-y goodness for me all the way ;)

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