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Has anyone who owns >$50 powercords ever wired a house? - Page 3

post #31 of 42
If you don't believe in cables then do yourself a favor and by the cheapest crap you can find. The last time I broke a cable it was an IDE cable stuck in a harddrive about 12 years ago.
post #32 of 42
the world is not black and white, only. there *are* grey levels.

and sometimes, 'cheapest crap' works just fine. like, for example, digital.

thinking you NEED to spend a lot, that's the fallacy.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
Conductor geometry also has an effect on emi/rfi.
Topology won't remove any RF already present on the AC wiring either.

One thing is to avoid crosstalk between cables, which can be achieved by twisting the pairs, which also makes the magnetic fields of each cancel each other out, also enhancing the cancelling out of outside magnetic fields. This is well known and widely used in telecommunications, for examples in Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) networking cables. Not fancy, not expensive at all. It's also used in very inexpensive and well built power cords, just as shielding and ferrite chokes.

Yet, topology doesn't remove any RF already present on the AC wiring.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmcmanus View Post
I love simple questions; they really are simple.
Have you noticed the OP never asked if power cords make a sound difference.
All he asked is, "If you ever wired a house have you spent over $50 on a power cable?" So now the whole thread gets derailed to whether cables make a sound difference or not.

Just simply answer the dang question!!!
post #35 of 42
I think spiraling conductors removes rfi.
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
I think spiraling conductors removes rfi.
Whenever cables are said to suppress RFI, it means that the cable doesn't let RFI out or RFI in easily. It doesn't mean it will remove RFI already inside the conductor. (For that you can easily use an external snap-on ferrite core though.)

In a sense, twisted pair cables are spiraling cables. They spiral very mildly around the inner core of the external insulation of both wires which are side by side and twisted. As already explained, it doesn't remove RFI already in the wires.

If you spiral a single wire with insulation tightly enough, you don't get a simple conductor, but an actual inductor, or electromagnet (coils). All conductors do have some inductance (as well as resistance and capacitance,) but an actual inductor is not just a conductor.

Inductors offer high resistance to high-frequencies, and they do play a role in low-pass filtering circuits. But they also are antennas themselves, radiating energy to the surroundings, and accepting interference from other circuits. In that sense, even though it filters high frequencies, it doesn't really remove RFI, it actually creates more of it.
post #37 of 42
http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/cables/ma...ingTheory.html

This link talks about how a cable may theoretically reduce rf from the mains socket. From what I've read, cable geometry can cause emi AND rfi to be reduced, of course under the right circumstances.
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
RF interference rejection by mains cables?

This link talks about how a cable may theoretically reduce rf from the mains socket. From what I've read, cable geometry can cause emi AND rfi to be reduced, of course under the right circumstances.
I suggest don't trust audio companies "info" pages. Look up electronics engineering sources and information. RFI can be measured and has been measured for years.
post #39 of 42
^ I am not trusting audio companies info pages, try to read the link. This is what happens when someone honestly tries to discover the science behind anything. I think from now on I will never contribute anything to the understanding of cables, you guys can suffer from your own ignorance. To quote Jesus, Let the dead bury the dead. Unsubscribing and welcome to ignore rsaavedra.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
^ I am not trusting audio companies info pages, try to read the link.
If the link came from a creditable source with no conflict of interests, I'd probably read it.
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsaavedra View Post
If the link came from a creditable source with no conflict of interests, I'd probably read it.
From the article:
Quote:
Given all the points I consider I am sceptical about the idea we should choose a ‘special’ mains cable for the specific purpose of acting as an ‘RF filter’. My own view is that simpler and perhaps cheaper methods are widely available and would probably be more likely to succeed. I would be more inclined to employ those if I was worried about mains-conveyed RFI. Various component companies can provide mains filtering units, etc. at relatively modest prices. If you wish to filter the mains input, then my suggestion would be to buy a mains filter unit, not a new mains cable!
I'd have to say, your attitude is the reason I think that anti-cables-making-a-difference people are less interested in the truth of the matter than anyone else. His conclusion, which I quoted from above, agrees with my experiences.
post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post
I'd have to say, your attitude
Can you describe what my attitude is exactly?
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