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has anyone done this burn in test?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've lurked threads where people get really angry talking about burn-in.

sorry, now I'm FASCINATED,

What I'm wondering is has anyone taken 2 identical looking phones s/he has never seen before

1 that has been burnt in
1 that has not

And been able to correctly tell which is which?
post #2 of 11
Up to now the differences have been slight mostly, so no in most cases.
post #3 of 11
Measurements a far more reliable than someone trying to find out which is which and two different headphones could sound differently from the beginning..
Measurements and related questions (and answers) can be found by using a feature called "search".
From all the headphone measurements I've seen there were no significant differences between before and after burn-in.
post #4 of 11
The problem is this, do you know how the headphone is supposed to sound? No, everyone has his/her own perception of sound and sound preferences. In short, even if you know you want a certain headphone and you are well informed as long as you have not listened to the headphone you are still gambling with you ears.
post #5 of 11
Maybe, but I would be equally impressed just if someone could tell the difference at all, let alone tell you which one was better. I think this might be what the OP meant, since it has been worded vaguely.

In any case, if you can't say which is better (as many people who believe in burn-in are trying to claim they can), you shouldn't be wasting electricity letting them run by themselves.

OP, the answer to your question is no, no one ever has. Learn your lesson here and stop wasting your time reading arguments involving people who don't know what scientific method is. Subjectivist on this site is just another word for 'I don't care what anyone says, what any data says, I hear it and you better believe me.' The more you learn about audio, the more you'll realise it's really not that expensive/tedious, and it's basically been figured out. The problem is people think audiophile means working really hard for good sound quality, and they're trying desperately to live up to it in an age where it's been made incredibly accessible. 30 years ago you just had to own a lot of records and be really interested in music and artististic philosophy to be an audiophile. In my opinion that's what it should still be. Look at this site and laugh. There's over 20 forums about sound equipment, and companies sponored to sell sound equipment, and if you scroll for a really long time, all the way to the bottom there is one about music. That says something about the difference between the demand for people who want to talk about music, and the demand for people who want to talk about equipment. If this were an audiophile community, I would think there'd be a forum for every general genre I tell you this to save you time since you seem like an open minded person with healthy skepticism, and if you look for data to support the jargon thrown around here, you're going to spend a year like I did not finding it.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post
Measurements a far more reliable than someone trying to find out which is which and two different headphones could sound differently from the beginning..
Measurements and related questions (and answers) can be found by using a feature called "search".
From all the headphone measurements I've seen there were no significant differences between before and after burn-in.
cool. Yeah I dig the search function too, I found it useful in exploring the site and lurking threads about burn-in....

before I posted this one.

Anyway in measurement threads people say that there is a qualitative difference that can't be defined by those measurements, so my response was....hmm.... the OP... a definitive test.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef
OP, the answer to your question is no, no one ever has. Learn your lesson here and stop wasting your time reading arguments involving people who don't know what scientific method is. Subjectivist on this site is just another word for 'I don't care what anyone says, what any data says, I hear it and you better believe me.' The more you learn about audio, the more you'll realise it's really not that expensive/tedious, and it's basically been figured out. The problem is people think audiophile means working really hard for good sound quality, and they're trying desperately to live up to it in an age where it's been made incredibly accessible. 30 years ago you just had to own a lot of records and be really interested in music and artististic philosophy to be an audiophile. In my opinion that's what it should still be. Look at this site and laugh. There's over 20 forums about sound equipment, and companies sponored to sell sound equipment, and if you scroll for a really long time, all the way to the bottom there is one about music. That says something about the difference between the demand for people who want to talk about music, and the demand for people who want to talk about equipment. If this were an audiophile community, I would think there'd be a forum for every general genre I tell you this to save you time since you seem like an open minded person with healthy skepticism, and if you look for data to support the jargon thrown around here, you're going to spend a year like I did not finding it.
wow epic post man. I definitely see what you're saying. You're being a bit harsh about the music forum being so low, its a headphone site foremost. But otherwise I dig listening to music more than scrutinizing its....uh... delivery system... And I wouldn't let the latter detract from the former... I could see how going too far down this rabit hole could result in a serious net loss to one's psychoacoustic fidelity so I take your warning to heart.

But it's still fascinating! The underlying questions about wheather to trust one's senses over empirical data or others experiences.... pot-heads wonder wheather we see the same red "what if my red is your green, dude..." and I'm supposed to trust we hear the same "bright, wide soundstage?" It's just a cool microcosm for a lot of things.
post #7 of 11
fella, you should also check out the video from Ethan's AES presentation. It was posted around here some weeks ago.
It doesn't target your burn-in question but covers some "myths".
post #8 of 11
For me burn in works, the results may be slight but that's all I need.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deep Funk View Post
For me burn in works, the results may be slight but that's all I need.
And it seems to work for a lot of other guys on the forums here as well, but that doesn't mean that it's not something that just happens in your head. (for headphones)
post #10 of 11
I'm guessing I could tell the difference between K701s new and burned in.

But that's the only headphone that I'm aware of that I might be able to.

The rest it seems too slight to me.



Cables, SS amps, I don't think so.


Not to say that there aren't burn in effects, just that they're small.

And I'm not saying the human listening system isn't exquisitely sensitive,
but it does seem to wander quite a bit in it's conscious apprehension of what it's hearing.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyll Hertsens View Post
Not to say that there aren't burn in effects, just that they're small.
Exactly!

Every single component (even a cable) undeniably has effects, but most of them are too small for us to notice. (However, your mind might play some tricks on you. Especially if you're running out of oxygen sitting in a small box, hehe.)
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