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Please recommend a simple voltmeter.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am looking for something cheap and simple to make sure cables I am making work safely. So I figure I need a voltmeter to ensure the connections are soldered and there is no chance of shorting so I know my work is safe to be used on my hifi. I may need an ammeter instead of a voltmeter, or both, not sure really!

Any recommendations thanked for in advance.
post #2 of 11
I think an ohmmeter is used to check for short circuits.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I see I probably need a multimeter of which there are many ranging from £5 off ebay from China/Hong Kong to hundreds of pounds. I want a cheap simple one!
post #4 of 11
I went to a local tool shop and bought the cheapest multimeter they had. It died, so I got another. That died too... The cheapest was £5 so the next time I went for the next one at £15 - it's not died yet, but the wire cover on the probes is hard and breaks, requiring heatshrinking.

Just to check continuity you don't need anything expensive, but don't buy the cheapest either unless you're really careful - both of mine died of physical failure (the big switch on the front), they still measured ok.

Hope that helps
post #5 of 11
I bought this one a couple years ago, and although I've since bought a better one, it still works well and is accurate enough for general work. It tests continuity just fine. Less than $14, if you don't mind waiting for the free shipping from China.

DealExtreme: $13.58 2.7" LCD Digital Multimeter with Silicone Case (1*6F22 included)
post #6 of 11
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post #7 of 11
Cheap one: Multimeter Model MAS 830

Just use an ohmmeter and check for zero resistance unless you have a continuity function (or go here if you want more info: http://www.ladyada.net/library/metertut/continuity.html)

Hope all is well!
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanP View Post
Cheap one: Multimeter Model MAS 830

Just use an ohmmeter and check for zero resistance unless you have a continuity function (or go here if you want more info: Multimeter Tutorial - Learning about continuity)

Hope all is well!
This is slightly cheaper for the the same thing but I would expect shipping to be the limiting factor. Circuit Specialists Digital Multimeters
post #9 of 11
if this is for audio, you should get an oxygen-free meter.

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but if you can't find one cheap, a hardware store and, if you have them near you, 'dollar stores' will have cheap meters. not audio grade but they'll do for non-critical testing.

post #10 of 11
If it's just a one-shot test, and you're not making any more, why don't you just borrow a meter? Walk into a local electronics repair shop, if you're friendly and buy some shrink tubing or something they'll probably check them out for you for free. If you're on the brink of getting into electronics as a hobby, though (making your own cables, you are teetering!) then invest in a decent meter. My first meter was a Sears Craftsman branded Fluke, I forget the model but it did volts, amps and ohms and was less than 100 US dollars. There are cheaper Flukes on eBay, do your research though, Fluke makes a ton of different models that do things you probably won't ever need. I have a Fluke 87v now, it was pricey but it does capacitance and is very accurate, and I use it for working on my house, my car, my computer, the guitars I build, and now on my rapidly developing audio habit. A good meter, properly used and with the occasional professional calibration, will last a very very long time. As my dad told me, "you buy good sh*t once."
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanP View Post
Cheap one: Multimeter Model MAS 830

Just use an ohmmeter and check for zero resistance unless you have a continuity function (or go here if you want more info: Multimeter Tutorial - Learning about continuity)

Hope all is well!
Thanks for that. I have gone for something that looks very similar to the MAS 830 which has a continuity meter which will beep if the connection is good.

The tutorial is excellent as well.
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