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Help with new 35mm camera - Page 2

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
I plan on purchasing a used D40 when I get the money. I am saving up for college this fall. I plan to take a few photography classes while there, I know a few people that have taken them. So I am hoping that I can do my processing there. I just got my camera today and I plan to shoot a roll over the weekend and have it processed so I can see how it turns out. Even if all is lost, I am not out hardly any money.
post #17 of 22
Too bad you don't have the money for a D40 now. $400 for a refurb with kit lens at Adorama
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d View Post
I plan to take a few photography classes while there, I know a few people that have taken them. So I am hoping that I can do my processing there.
Great plan, you will learn and be in the company of other photographers. Meanwhile keep looking at other people's work (books, magazines, exhibitions, web galleries) to figure out what works for you and how the medium works generally. Black & White Photography magazine (published in UK, should be available at larger bookstores in US) is worth a look.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d View Post
I just got my camera today and I plan to shoot a roll over the weekend and have it processed so I can see how it turns out.
Let us know!
post #19 of 22
You can get screw-on close-up lenses that attach to your existing lens. While not as good as true macro lenses, they are not that bad either, and dramatically cheaper. Processing film is not that expensive and can be done at home. Film itself is getting more expensive, but depending on where you live you can get deals on short-dated or recently expired film at pro photo supply stores. Good film scanners like the Nikon Coolscan 5000ED or 9000ED are very expensive (well over $1000, when you can find them in the first place). Some of the Epson V series flatbeds do a decent enough job for medium format but struggle with 35mm.
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
If I do eventually decide to process my own film at home, what all would I need to enlarge the photos and, I don't remember the word, put them on say an 8x12 photo or something?

Oh and where on the camera does it tell me the threads of the lens to see if filters and stuff will fit?
post #21 of 22
You see the white lettering around the glass in your lens? That should tell you the lens diameter (be sure not to mistake it with the lens focal length).

To enlarge the photo's you'd need an 'enlarger' lol.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d View Post
If I do eventually decide to process my own film at home, what all would I need to enlarge the photos and, I don't remember the word, put them on say an 8x12 photo or something??
You'd need some equipment and, more importantly to avoid wasting time, money & energy at least some basic hands-on instruction.

There is some good info here to give you an idea of what is involved:
ILFORD PHOTO - Getting Started

Enlargers and the various accessories you need can often be had for very little or no money at the moment via craigs list etc. I was given one this week for free by someone for example so people will often donate them rather than throw them away.


Quote:
Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d View Post
Oh and where on the camera does it tell me the threads of the lens to see if filters and stuff will fit?
The lens may be marked with the thread diameter or if there is already some kind of filter fitted (often people put a UV filter on which will look like clear glass) it will likely be marked with the size in mm. If the lens has a lens cap that may have the size on as well.
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