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post #31 of 112
Thread Starter 
I have the Gilels album performing three of the Beethoven Sonatas, and have always admired his playing too. I don't know of Annie Fischer or Jando, but have heard Alfred Brendel recordings on a number of occasions. I will have to check Fischer and Jando out. Thanks.

Perahia is great too, although I don't have any of his recordings currently.
post #32 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
Martha Argerich started my love for classical piano years ago when I stumbled by accident over her Liszt B-minor sonata.. It blew me of my socks and the piano quest started for me..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridleyguy View Post
His "Transcendental Etudes" are also a must if you love Liszt!
Thanks for those recommendations. Most of my Liszt collection is from my grandmother, she had quite a collection of LPs and liked piano concertos the most; Liszt was by far her favorite. I really need to dig those records out of storage, as it's been awhile since we listened together and I do miss them (and my grandmother as well ^-^).

A little more about Franz Liszt:

As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the "Neudeutsche Schule" ("New German School"); he hailed from Hungary originally.

As a performer, Liszt became renowned throughout Europe during the 19th century for his great skill. He was said by his contemporaries to have been the most technically advanced pianist of his age and perhaps the greatest pianist of all time.

There are few, if any, good sources that give an impression of how Liszt really sounded from the 1820s. Carl Czerny, an Austrian pianist, composer and Liszt's teacher, claimed Liszt was a natural who played according to feeling, and reviews of his concerts especially praise the brilliance, strength and precision in his playing. At least one critic also mentions his ability to absolutely never change tempo, which may be due to his father's insistence that he practice with a metronome.

Liszt was also quite an accomplished author, with many published essays on the arts; he also wrote a book about Chopin, as well as a book about the Romanis (Gypsies) and their music in Hungary.

In the 1860's he suffered debilitating personal tragedies in his life, and entered a monastery of the Franciscan order where excelled as a monk. On April 25, 1865, he received the tonsure at the hands of Cardinal Hohenlohe; following this he was sometimes called the Abbé Liszt. He received the four minor orders on July 31, 1865, porter, lector, exorcist!, and acolyte.

As a piano teacher, quite a few of his students went on to successful performance careers of their own.

post #33 of 112
Thread Starter 
It may be too corny for some of the younger generation, but "Song Without End", with Dirk Bogarde as Liszt is a very entertaining movie with of course, his music.

My other recommendation is a Liszt CD (Linn records), with George-Emmanuel Lazaridis performing Liszt's Sonata in B and the Paganini Grand Etudes. For those that don't know of Paganini, he was considered the Liszt of the violin and his compositions were known to be extremely difficult to play.
post #34 of 112
Every now and then I take a path off the beaten track and listen to Gould's recordings of the five Beethoven concertos and his Mozart / Beethoven sonatas. Not to everyone's taste but it does break the monotony of a Kempff or Brendel recording.
post #35 of 112
Thread Starter 
Is he humming throughout the recording session?

You have to try the Agerich recordings of the concertos on the DG website. She is an incredible force - and each one she interprets in her own unique way - unsurpassed speed, clarity, trills to die for, and an attack that is so ferocious it will astonish you. You won't go back to Brendel and Kempff easily ...I know I have been converted!
post #36 of 112
Has anyone heard "Beethoven and the Natural World"? It's a lightweight overview of his "greatest hits", interspersed with nature sounds, and I think it works, for what it is. My sister gave it to me out of the blue one Christmas, and and even though it isn't quite appropriate for serious music appreciation-type listening, I find it quite relaxing and enjoyable. I think it is part of a series that highlights different composers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridleyguy View Post
It may be too corny for some of the younger generation, but "Song Without End", with Dirk Bogarde as Liszt is a very entertaining movie with of course, his music.

My other recommendation is a Liszt CD (Linn records), with George-Emmanuel Lazaridis performing Liszt's Sonata in B and the Paganini Grand Etudes. For those that don't know of Paganini, he was considered the Liszt of the violin and his compositions were known to be extremely difficult to play.
Thanks for that, I will look into both of those as I don't have much of Liszt's work on CD, and I do really like Paganini as well.


edit: wow, that movie sounds great, but not from Netflix as the VHS seems way better than the DVD release according to reviews from Amazon, so I bought a "like new" used VHS copy for $5. If you have only seen the DVD version, you might want to check out these reviews.
post #37 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridleyguy View Post
Is he humming throughout the recording session?

You have to try the Agerich recordings of the concertos on the DG website. She is an incredible force - and each one she interprets in her own unique way - unsurpassed speed, clarity, trills to die for, and an attack that is so ferocious it will astonish you. You won't go back to Brendel and Kempff easily ...I know I have been converted!
Everyone buys Gould for the humming. Yes I do have Argerich as well. It's funny the comments you made about her playing apply equally as well to Gould, in a weird sort of way. Glenn Gould: Hereafter is a great documentary on Gould by Bruno Monsaingeon and one I would heartily recommend, regardless whether one likes or dislikes his work.
post #38 of 112
Thread Starter 
If Gould could only have hummed in tune ...it wouldn't be so bad
post #39 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridleyguy View Post
If Gould could only have hummed in tune ...it wouldn't be so bad
I am made to believe that he actually did it subconsciously and at some point tried to eliminate it but failed miserably. But for someone who was pitch perfect yes he could have done a better job humming in tune.
post #40 of 112
Thread Starter 
We should conduct a poll on most eccentric concert pianist. While Gould had his public eccentricities, Horowitz may trump him. Where do I start ... 3 (?) years w/o leaving his Manhatten apartment, later in life ..only performed as a soloist, had blackout curtains travelling with him for hotels, ate the same meal every concert day (Dover sole) ..and concerts were only on Sundays (I recall) at 2(?) in the afternoon. And I believe he was very particular about the piano(s) Steinway sent for his concert tours - now that one makes sense!
post #41 of 112
And as for Gould, wearing a wool jacket and gloves in Summer (he had a phobia about getting an infection); sitting on the same (very low) piano stool throughout his career; an obsession with studio recording and forsaking all concerts throughout the latter part of his career; and, last but not least, writing that famous fugue

YouTube - Glenn Gould talks about So You Want to Write a Fugue

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6hQnBc5sQU&feature=fvw
post #42 of 112
Thread Starter 
Yes ... he was quite a character! One wonders how he could even play from that position!
post #43 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridleyguy View Post
We should conduct a poll on most eccentric concert pianist. While Gould had his public eccentricities, Horowitz may trump him. Where do I start ... 3 (?) years w/o leaving his Manhatten apartment, later in life ..only performed as a soloist, had blackout curtains travelling with him for hotels, ate the same meal every concert day (Dover sole) ..and concerts were only on Sundays (I recall) at 2(?) in the afternoon. And I believe he was very particular about the piano(s) Steinway sent for his concert tours - now that one makes sense!
Gould definitely wins the prize for most eccentric concert pianist. While Horowitz had eccentricites, when he played you only noticed the music. GG on the other hand, his posture, humming and completely original interpretations...
post #44 of 112
Thread Starter 
Has anyone checked out medici.tv? Some nice video on Martha Agerich, etc. I didn't subscribe, but I would like to find out more about it.
post #45 of 112
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any concerts lined up for the Spring/Summer?

I will be attending a solo recital by Yuja Wang on May 1st.
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