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Linux for sound? - Page 7

post #91 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hybrys View Post


For one, most USB DACs, including some $2000+ ones, are limited to 16/48 by a previous technical limitation.  So calling it bad just because of that is ignorant.  It doesn't have a specialized driver.

 

The M-Audio Transit is actually a poorly reviewed device, if I recall.  So you being high and mighty about it is kind of funny.

 

Also, the uDAC has a unique pricepoint, and is well reviewed, even against some products over twice the price.  It runs a fairly high quality ESS ES9022 DAC chip.


 

I was referring to the specs as means to compare a device with typical usb1.1 specs vs one going above it. I was not praising the Transit for its amazingness, it just wasn't actually horrible. (You can find reviews going either way, it does a great job as transport, sounds better than a PCM2702 based dac, but it doesn't sound as musical as the DAC attached to it, not the point at all though.)

 

The 16/32-48 sounds like they come from the usb receiver then anyways if the actual dac is the ES9022.

 

I was commenting on the posts saying it needed a special driver, when the specs seem to suggest it should have a receiver chip that shouldn't need any special driver as it's in USB Audio 1.1 range (think of the myriad of USB dacs with PCM270x or PCM290x receivers alone, not counting the CS, CM or others out there), and if nuforce did something to need one, that's then junk. (Read it as the attitude of manufacturers, not the quality of the device (at its pricepoint))

 

And if it does not have/need a specialized driver like you say, then there is just more FUD in this thread that's junk.

post #92 of 102

I see it is a USB-only DAC; if it refuses to work with linux, you are screwed.  No way of using a digital out from the motherboard.  That's why it is important to find out before purchasing.  It is obvious that nuforce dont want bussiness with linux.  We feel the same way towards them.  Dont give them your money.

post #93 of 102

There are several good alternatives to the uDac though for that price range.  My portable of choice for both mac and Linux right now is the Carat Emerald, because it's robust, fairly detailed, and can run bus powered.  In my mind it's a much better portable option than the uDac.  I'm actually selling one of mine as I have an extra.  I've also heard reasonable things about the new FiiO e7, and that's a direct competitor price wise.


Edited by Dev Avidon - 6/2/10 at 6:37am
post #94 of 102

That's a little higher of a price range, and I've seen people trade them for uDACs. <_<

 

You might just be better off contacting uDAC support, and asking about linux.  Maybe they can tell you the USB receiver, and you can find a driver.

post #95 of 102

The dual booters lurking should just plug in their uDAC, boot linux and check 'dmesg' and or 'lsusb' for info after they plug in the uDAC with linux running. ;)


Edited by morfic - 6/4/10 at 8:23pm
post #96 of 102

Just a tip, if you buy a new computer and don't want windows.  Trying to get the computer with no pre-installed OS is nearly impossible, as these manufactures have strict contracts with MS.  But what you can do, is rather simple.  Upon getting your new computer, you must agree to the MS EULA (End User License Agreement).  The computer will prompt you for acceptance.  Obviously we don't want to pay for windows, so we simply dont accept this agreement.  Call the company (Dell for example) and tell them you do not accept the agreement.  They will ask you to ship back your install disc's and should refund you your money.

post #97 of 102

I decided to get a custom Hewlett Packard HPE-190t desktop PC with their 27" monitor.


Edited by Welly Wu - 6/6/10 at 2:08am
post #98 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Welly Wu View Post

I decided to get a custom Hewlett Packard HPE-190t desktop PC with their 27" monitor.


Alwaysalwaysalways order parts and build the machine yourself if you're building a desktop.  You can save a boatload, and truly customize it the way you want it.

 

Nevermind that most OEM monitors are crap.  >_>

post #99 of 102

Nah, I am lazy. I would rather have them build it for me and get their warranty along with technical support.

post #100 of 102

uDAC-2 and other Nuforce DACs work for some version of Linux.  We developed the hardware conforming to standard USB Audio, but we are not proficient in providing Linux support.

This Linux setup article might help: http://blog.agdunn.net/?p=434

Basically if you use Linux, sorry, you are on your own. You can always return the product back to us for a full refund.  For those of you who have gotten it to work, we appreciate if you can email support@nuforce.com with your setup (Linux OS version, and config file setup etc).  And we will return in kind with discount coupon or gift. 

 

Jason
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dev Avidon View Post




As did I until I bought a uDac.  Didn't work.  Checked with NuForce, windows or mac only apparently. 



 

post #101 of 102

Folks, just wanted to say, the easiest way I've found to make sure you get bit-perfect audio is to use DeaDBeeF as your audio player, and then;

 

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/546/screenshot0613201104542.png/

 

you select the output that says "Direct hardware device without conversions".

 

Then, to make sure, you open the terminal, type in this:

 

http://img813.imageshack.us/img813/6971/screenshot0613201104553.png

 

And make sure that the access says RW_INTERLEAVED. This will also then automatically change the sample rate according to the sample rate of the song playing, ensuring bit-perfect output at all times.

 

Easier than Windows.

post #102 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by WrxSTI View Post

Folks, just wanted to say, the easiest way I've found to make sure you get bit-perfect audio is to use DeaDBeeF as your audio player, and then;

 

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/546/screenshot0613201104542.png/

 

you select the output that says "Direct hardware device without conversions".

 

Then, to make sure, you open the terminal, type in this:

 

http://img813.imageshack.us/img813/6971/screenshot0613201104553.png

 

And make sure that the access says RW_INTERLEAVED. This will also then automatically change the sample rate according to the sample rate of the song playing, ensuring bit-perfect output at all times.

 

Easier than Windows.



I completely agree with WrxSTI. DeaDBeef is very easy to set up for bit perfect output in Linux. The only (non-audio) downside to DeaDBeef, for me, is that it doesn't work with the "Nowplaying" Screenlet on my desktop. Apart from that, I'm of the opinion that, sonically, it's every bit as good as Windows "Foobar2000" in wasapi mode.

 

I alternately use "Quod Libet" which is another excellent Linux media player and which also provides bit perfect output for me when the player is set to "alsa" and "alsasink device=hw:0,1".

 


Edited by Rizlaw - 6/14/11 at 2:41pm
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