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New Audio-Gd Reference 8 and Reference 9?! - Page 4

post #46 of 93
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
Does diamond differential have some technical benefits over ACSS? I am kind of tempted to try since I need some musicality in my setup but I know good quality XLR cables are expensive.
Kingwa made it clear to me that the diamond differential dacs are not better, technically speaking, over the ACSS dacs. It's just a different flavor.
post #47 of 93
Sometimes people listen to music for musicality. Trying to watch movies and play games with the compass+moon hdam+hfi-2200 taught me that musical isn't for all situations, unless you are a big fan of musicals like Mary Poppins or like to hear Darth Vader all sing-songy. But for plain music, color can be magical.
post #48 of 93
According to a guide on his Chinese forum, some people prefer neutral gear, and some prefer warmer, more musical sound, so he makes two different kinds of gear to suit each taste. It's reflected on here by people who like cheap tube amps which have a very rolled-off treble.
post #49 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post
According to a guide on his Chinese forum, some people prefer neutral gear, and some prefer warmer, more musical sound, so he makes two different kinds of gear to suit each taste. It's reflected on here by people who like cheap tube amps which have a very rolled-off treble.
Does this mean musical is synonym of warm and muddy? I don't want to start an argument here, just want to understand what people find "musical" :-)
post #50 of 93
For me musical would mean to have the right flow and timing in the music. Otherwise it sounds not natural.
... but I think for Audio-Gd this is neutral and tubey sound is musical
post #51 of 93
Everyone has their own meaning of musicality since we all have different tastes and reasons for listening to music, different ears, different audio equipment, and different recordings, not something I would try to quantify in a general opinion. I just go by how emotional something sounds. If I'm listening to an album and it seriously fails to impact me emotionally as I'd expect it to in a real life studio (or wherever it was recorded), I'd say the sound signature was clinical, maybe due to recording flaws, but if the same coloration persists with many other albums I would attribute it to a reproduction device's sound coloration. If it affects me more than I'd expect it to in real life, I'd say there was a musical sound signature somewhere. If the album is portrayed with an ambience parallel to my personal imagination of unembellished, yet unclinical, real life ambience, then I'd consider the sound signature to be neutral.

As of right now though I'm listening through the ears of Spock with my uncotton-modded pro 900.
post #52 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobold View Post
For me musical would mean to have the right flow and timing in the music. Otherwise it sounds not natural.
That's the definition that I have also of musical.
For me, a musical sound is a very analog sound contrary to a jittery sound.
post #53 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobold View Post
For me musical would mean to have the right flow and timing in the music. Otherwise it sounds not natural.
Which is neutral to me: -)
If a recording has not the right flow, but the source will still produce it....now that is not natural to me. But I agree it's all about personal preferences.
post #54 of 93
A good "neutral" setup should sound musical and analog because it is the nature of the music itself, if it not it should be the recording that is flawed.

On "musical" systems lesser quality records sound better and more musical but you lose transparency and definition on well recored ones.

And of course a high rolled-of music recorded can sound natural on bright system so it is very hard to know if the sound fault come from the gear or recording.

It also seem that many people are used to the "digitalis" sound so a really neutral system can seem to be warm as in reality it is not, there is also the system matching thing...

So when kingwa say it is more warm it is by his standards,system and his ears but maybe the musical flavors DAC are more "neutral" ? And it can be if you are used to vinyl sound.

Also note that Asiatic people by their cultural,language,their music,physical differences don't seem to hear the exact same thing as western people, that could explain why Japanese gears are usually regard as "clinical".
post #55 of 93
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omega17TheTrue View Post

Also note that Asiatic people by their cultural,language,their music,physical differences don't seem to hear the exact same thing as western people, that could explain why Japanese gears are usually regard as "clinical".
I'm Asian and i know more than a handful of fellow asian audiophiles, and that's a gross generalization.

I'm curious, which Japanese gear are clinical? Any examples please
post #56 of 93
There's a lot of difference between Asian languages, just like there's a lot of difference between Western languages, I would even say there can be massive difference between accents/dialects of the same language. When Omega says we interpret sounds differently based on our background, I think that's absolutely correct. Attaching emotions to new sounds is half of learning a new language. Likewise, there's some music that don't require much of a cultural or ethnic background to appreciate, music that lasts for hundreds of years, and then there's other music that require prior understanding to fully appreciate.
post #57 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by noinimod View Post
I'm Asian and i know more than a handful of fellow asian audiophiles, and that's a gross generalization.

I'm curious, which Japanese gear are clinical? Any examples please
I just meant that everyone hear things differently, and yes its generalization that mean it is false like every stereotypes but it contain a part of truth.

As examples there is "zen hifi" like 47 labs but i don't have other examples as i don't know them but some people believe as a stereotype that some asian brands sound clinical i don't really know more.
post #58 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by haloxt View Post
There's a lot of difference between Asian languages, just like there's a lot of difference between Western languages, I would even say there can be massive difference between accents/dialects of the same language. When Omega says we interpret sounds differently based on our background, I think that's absolutely correct. Attaching emotions to new sounds is half of learning a new language. Likewise, there's some music that don't require much of a cultural or ethnic background to appreciate, music that lasts for hundreds of years, and then there's other music that require prior understanding to fully appreciate.
What about Asian people who didn't grow up speaking or hearing Asian languages? I spent the most of my life speaking English, although I can understand Korean. But just because I spent time growing up in Massachusetts doesn't mean English with a southern twang is absolutely foreign to me. I have a few friends who are Korean but speak English with a southern accent, is this a product of regional differences and upbringings, or something inherent among Korean people? Those Koreans were born and raised in America just like me. Also, if you do listen to "Asian music" you'll notice they pretty much copied American styles of music. Any argument that generalizes an entire race to have clinical ears finds little weight to me.

BTW, I own an amp made by Pete Millett, a source made by Twisted Pear, and a variety of headphones. Analytical or not, I enjoy using equipment seemingly made by Americans whom I'm sure designed and manufactured these pieces of equipment without thinking, how can I make this more of a western sound. If your intent was that geographical location can affect the design of equipment, then we'd also have to look at the origin of the parts, and the last time I checked parts design can come all over the place, with manufacture occurring in large part in China.
post #59 of 93
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post #60 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by trevorlane View Post
Any argument that generalizes an entire race to have clinical ears finds little weight to me.
Please don't deform what i said, i just meant that some factors influence the way we listen like ears shape,likings,cultural and also the language play a big role in how we listen things and it is a important part of cultures but in the end i think the differences are kinda small.

I don't meant to sound racist it is just science.
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