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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 486

post #7276 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaed View Post

Hi again |joker|, I'm considering advancing to a more analytical, but still aggressive signature ala the Brainwavz B2. Moving on from the FXT90, how would you describe the transition from the coloredness and musicality of the 90 to the B2's? Do you think the two would compliment each other quite well?

 

Thanks!

I switch back and forth between FXT90's and Fischer DBA-02's every week or two. Joker has done his usual excellent job succinctly describing the differences, although I find the midrange to be wonderful and similarly forward on both. I notice soundstage and instrument separation a little more on the Fischers, while the JVC's are a bit more cohesive.

 

It takes me a few tracks to get used to the different signatures: deeper, more impactful bass on the JVC's; astonishing clarity, detail and transparency with the Fischers. Both are extremely enjoyable and I'm glad to have them, but could live with either one for a long time (used DBA-02's exclusively for 1.5 years). I've experimented with tips on each to reduce those differences (short double flange from M11+ on the JVC's, Shure double flange - like Ety triples with the small end removed - on the Fischers).


Edited by dfrost - 6/18/12 at 11:18pm
post #7277 of 16803

I know most of Fischer's cans are made by Yoga, is the same true of their IEMs?

post #7278 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

I guess you can expect a leaner, cooler sound with less bass presence and less midrange forwardness. Just like moving from any other colored-sounding IEM to a more neutral one, you may hear details you haven't noticed before just because nothing will overshadow the fine nuances with the B2. I do think they would be good compliments and they are both some of the best earphones you can get for the money with their respective signatures.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfrost View Post

I switch back and forth between FXT90's and Fischer DBA-02's every week or two. Joker has done his usual excellent job succinctly describing the differences, although I find the midrange to be wonderful and similarly forward on both. I notice soundstage and instrument separation a little more on the Fischers, while the JVC's are a bit more cohesive.

 

It takes me a few tracks to get used to the different signatures: deeper, more impactful bass on the JVC's; astonishing clarity, detail and transparency with the Fischers. Both are extremely enjoyable and I'm glad to have them, but could live with either one for a long time (used DBA-02's exclusively for 1.5 years). I've experimented with tips on each to reduce those differences (short double flange from M11+ on the JVC's, Shure grey single flex on the Fischers).

 

 

First of all, thanks to both |joker| and dfrost for their perspectives, both are extremely helpful! I guess what I'm trying to compensate between the two is having a fun, musical headphone and an analytical one while retaining a forward, engaging presentation, top-notch speed, and superior instrument separation. However, another object of scrutiny is the Sennheiser HD-25 1-ii/Amperior, which has also been on my mind since my first log into head-fi! I'm just talking aloud here, but I wonder if the portable HP would work as a compromise between the two IEMs, if at all; trying to work in durability/build quality into the equation, not to mention the i-device functionality is attractive to me.

 
 
 

Edited by vaed - 6/18/12 at 1:37pm
post #7279 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ganeshrajarajan View Post

gr06 vs m4, which is the best? which 1 wins in most of the following attributes?

 

 

more open sounding,

airy n spacious,

forward mids,

more speed,

best instrument seperation(definitely loves this attribute) and imaging,

detailed highs,

more articulating,

some bass with quality(not boomy),

smoother,

not thick sounding(i dono what is opposite to thick sounding),

 

which 1 is easy going with all type of genres??

thanks in advance!

 

Never heard the M4

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post

I know most of Fischer's cans are made by Yoga, is the same true of their IEMs?

 

Doubtful, judging from the packaging and hardware the IEMs come from different factories. Of the latest batch the Paradigm v3, Tandem, and Consonance seem to come from the same manufacturer but can't say anything about the rest, 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vaed View Post

 

First of all, thanks to both |joker| and dfrost for their perspectives, both are extremely helpful! I guess what I'm trying to compensate between the two is having a fun, musical headphone and an analytical one while retaining a forward, engaging presentation, top-notch speed, and superior instrument separation. However, another object of scrutiny is the Sennheiser HD-25 1-ii/Amperior, which has also been on my mind since my first log into head-fi! I'm just talking aloud here, but I wonder if the portable HP would work as a compromise between the two IEMs, if at all; trying to work in durability/build quality into the equation, not to mention the i-device functionality is attractive to me.

 
 
 

 

I don't think you'll find a compromise in the HD25 (I only have the HD25-1; no Amperior) but rather a third - more v-shaped - sound signature. It is fast an engaging but difficult to call analytical as a whole because the bass is quite strong. I definitely think the DBA-02 is flatter and more accurate in response. 

 

The FXT90 is also colored, but in a different way. 

post #7280 of 16803

Hi joker,

Based in part on your favorable review, I feel like I would be missing a golden opportunity if I don't pick up the Brainwavz B2 at their current pre-order price ($109). But I am wondering about a couple of things:

 

  1. I like having a variety of different sounding IEMs.  I own the Ety HF3 (which I like very much).  Would the B2 be somewhat redundant or are they different enough to own both at the same time?
  2. I know the B2 treble is on the bright side...but is it more prone to sibilance than the GR07?  The GR07 is about at the limit of what I would want.

 

As always...thanks for this thread and your input!

post #7281 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapidPulse View Post

Hi joker,

Based in part on your favorable review, I feel like I would be missing a golden opportunity if I don't pick up the Brainwavz B2 at their current pre-order price ($109). But I am wondering about a couple of things:

 

  1. I like having a variety of different sounding IEMs.  I own the Ety HF3 (which I like very much).  Would the B2 be somewhat redundant or are they different enough to own both at the same time?
  2. I know the B2 treble is on the bright side...but is it more prone to sibilance than the GR07?  The GR07 is about at the limit of what I would want.

 

As always...thanks for this thread and your input!

 

The HF5 and B2 are reasonably close in terms of sound signature but aside from the signature differences (slightly more mid-bass, brighter treble, etc) I think you'll gain a little in the way of resolution, punch, and soundstaging with the B2. I actually find the B2 a little less hot in the treble than the GR07 with a good seal so you should be okay there as well. 

post #7282 of 16803

jokerl are you enjoying the eph? i can't wait for the review to come out wink.gif

post #7283 of 16803

Just bought the CKM500s along with the EPH-100s, does anyone here have them both? and what do you think about them?

post #7284 of 16803

Hi, I'm looking for earphones with a mid or warm & sweet sound sig. I'm willing to pay around £15 -40 ($23-60).

 

Thanks.


Edited by Gee Simpson - 6/19/12 at 8:01am
post #7285 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gee Simpson View Post

Hi, I'm looking for earphones with a mid or warm & sweet sound sig. I'm willing to pay £15 -40 ($23-60).

 

Thanks.

 

Vsonic GR06 might work?

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/541204/concise-multi-iem-comparison-tdk-eb950-ba100-ba200-added-june-2nd-2012

 

mite be a good place to start tho? =)


Edited by Cotnijoe - 6/19/12 at 7:52am
post #7286 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by giorgiocis View Post

jokerl are you enjoying the eph? i can't wait for the review to come out wink.gif

 

Sure am, the review will be up very soon

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gee Simpson View Post

Hi, I'm looking for earphones with a mid or warm & sweet sound sig. I'm willing to pay around £15 -40 ($23-60).

 

Thanks.

 

The GR06 is a good option. Brainwavz M2 is another. Or, if you want the overall signature more on the 'balanced' side-  anything with a Siren armature - MEElec A151, Soundmagic PL50, Astrotec AM-90, etc. 

post #7287 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added Yamaha EPH-100 and Monster MD Trumpet

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(2B16) Yamaha EPH-100SL

Yamaha EPH-100SL 400x300.jpg
Reviewed June 2012

Details: Yamaha’s flagship in-ear, built around a dynamic microdriver
Current Price: $150 from amazon.com (MSRP: $199.95)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 104 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 3.9' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock bi-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (4/5) - Bi-flange silicone tips (5 sizes), ¼” adapter, 6.5’ (2m) extension cable, and soft zippered carrying case
Build Quality (4/5) – The EPH-100 boasts a nozzle-mounted microdriver and sturdy machined-aluminum housings. The cable is average in thickness but well-relieved on housing entry and at the L-plug. Driver flex is nonexistent
Isolation (4.5/5) – Some of the best among all dynamic-driver earphones with the stock bi-flange tips
Microphonics (4/5) – Reasonable when worn cord-down; nonexistent otherwise
Comfort (4.5/5) – Those with narrow ear canals may want to give these a pass due to the nozzle diameter but for everyone else the small, lightweight shells should be ergonomic and extremely unobtrusive. Stock eartips are surprisingly comfortable

Sound (8.9/10) – Taking Yamaha’s flagship spot away from the EPH-50, the EPH-100 utilizes a dynamic microdriver in a form factor much like that of Monster’s Miles Davis Trumpets. Like the Trumpets, the EPH-100 is an excellent all-rounder, but it is tuned differently from the mildly v-shaped Monsters. The bass is strong – deep and punchy, with a mild mid-bass lift giving it significantly more impact compared to most BA-based earphones and leaner dynamics such as the VSonic GR07 and Sony EX600. At the same time, the EPH-100 is far from overly bassy in the conventional sense – while not the most detailed or textured, its bass always remains clean and controlled. Like the Miles Davis Trumpet, which is a touch heavier on mid- and sub-bass in comparison, the EPH-100 is noticeably less boomy than Sennheiser’s IE7 and the older Miles Davis Tribute.

The mids of the EPH-100 are balanced very well with the low end – not recessed, but not quite forward. They are smooth, veil-free, dynamic, and more prominent compared to those of the slightly v-shaped Monster Trumpet. Clarity and detail are good and the note presentation is excellent – the EPH-100 is not overly thick or full-bodied but definitely cannot be called lean, either. The sound is very liquid but lacks a touch of crispness compared to the GR07 and many armature-based sets. The EPH-100 is what many would consider ‘musical’ - it sounds warmer, fuller, and more dynamic compared to sets such as the GR07 but is occasionally less adept at portraying fine details and texturing.

At the top the EPH-100 sounds somewhat smoothed-over compared to the more energetic Monster Miles Davis Trumpet, VSonic GR07, and JVC HA-FXT90, but also has the least potential for treble fatigue. Indeed, it’s difficult to imagine the treble of the Yamahas being overbearing for any listener. The downside is that it is not the most resolving – the highs are more refined than those of the Sennheiser IE7 but not as crisp and clean as those of the GR07. Top end extension is good, however, and the EPH-100 doesn’t lack air.

The presentation of the EPH-100 is befittingly well-rounded – soundstage size is above average, though it doesn’t quite keep up with the GR07 or Ultimate Ears TF10 in absolute width and out-of-the-head feel. Depth is good, as are the instrument separation and dynamics, which allow for better layering compared, for example, to the more flat- and distant-sounding GR07. At the same time, the EPH-100 is not as forward and intimate as the FXT90 and yet sounds open and uncongested, avoiding the more closed-in feel of many lower-end monitors.

Value (9.5/10) – Yamaha’s latest flagship makes a clean break from the company’s unremarkable lower-end models, offering up a comfortable, well-built, highly-isolating earphone in a compact, microdriver-based package. The sound quality is far above average as well, with strong bass, lush mids, and smooth – albeit slightly docile – treble. The EPH-100 is easily one of the best-sounding earphones – and one of the best overall packages - in its price class.

Pros: Great isolation; small and comfortable; smooth and dynamic sound
Cons: Nozzle-mounted driver not great for those with narrow ear canals


Big thanks to Gilly87 for the EPH-100 loan!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(1C16) Monster Miles Davis Trumpet

Monster Miles Davis Trumpet 400x300.jpg
Reviewed June 2012

Details: Trumpet-shaped follow-up to the original Miles Davis Tribute
Current Price: $270 from amazon.com (MSRP: $349.95)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: N/A | Sens: N/A | Freq: N/A | Cable: 3.9' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges, Yamaha EPH-100 tips
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (4.5/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Foam tips (5 sizes), Monster supertips (4 sizes), buttoned carrying case, soft carrying pouch, and shirt clip
Build Quality (4/5) – Styled to look like miniature trumpets, the unique housings are much sturdier than they look. The attention to detail is superb – the 3-button Apple remote modeled after a trumpet’s valves alone is a work of art. The only worry is the lack of flexible strain relief on the soft, tangle-resistant flat cable. Driver flex is nonexistent – a huge improvement over Monster’s other in-ears. Additionally, Monster’s lifetime warranty is still in effect for the Trumpets, although the one-time no-questions-asked replacement provision seems to have disappeared
Isolation (4/5) - Good with the right eartips
Microphonics (3.5/5) – Bothersome when worn cord-down; low otherwise
Comfort (4.5/5) – Since the dynamic micro-driver is mounted inside the nozzle, those with narrow ear canals may want to give these a pass but for everyone else the tiny, lightweight shells should be ergonomic and unobtrusive. My own ear canals are deep enough for these to be slept in comfortably and the Miles Davis plaques on the cords don’t cause any issues with over-the-ear wear

Sound (8.9/10) – The Trumpet is Monster’s follow-up to the Miles Davis Tribute (review 1C7) and the company’s first earphone utilizing a dynamic microdriver. Previously seen only in mid-level products, microdrivers have recently made their way into the very impressive Yamaha EPH-100 and JVC FXT90, and the Trumpet follows suit with sound that easily vaults it to the top of Monster’s lineup.

Considering that the Trumpet is a Monster product, it comes as no surprise that its bass is enhanced – both depth and impact outpace the Yamaha EPH-100 slightly and the VSonic GR07 and Sony MDR-EX600 significantly. There is good sub-bass extension but also moderate mid-bass lift, which causes the low end to sound much fuller and slightly more bloated than that of the GR07 or the bassy but BA-based Klipsch Image X10. Admittedly, the Trumpet is not as bassy as the older MD Tribute, with a low end that is less intrusive and more capable of scaling down when necessary, greatly reducing boominess and midrange bleed. The Sennheiser IE7, which has similar bass quantity, also falls short of the Trumpets in control, detail, and texture.

The midrange of the Trumpet boasts good clarity and detail but lacks the emphasis of the low end. The Yamaha EPH-100, while similar in technical performance, offers more forward mids, resulting in better bass-midrange balance, and is slightly clearer of bass bleed as a result. The GR07, too, is flatter, cooler in tone, and more accurate than the Trumpet. That said, the Trumpet is arguably the most nuanced and refined earphone in Monster’s entire lineup and again not nearly as thick and lush-sounding as the older MD Tribute.

The emphasized treble of the Trumpet completes the mildly v-shaped sound signature, causing them to sound brighter than the MD Tribute and Monster’s Turbine models. The emphasis is sufficient to make the Trumpets more tiring in the long run compared to a Turbine Pro but not heavy enough to introduce harshness or sibilance. In fact, the Trumpets tend to be less ‘hot’ on touchy recordings than the GR07 while remaining extremely crisp and clean, with no excessive note sustainment and good extension.

The presentation is wide, providing a large sonic space and good separation. Soundstage depth is good, as are the dynamics, and the Trumpet tends to sound less intimate than the older Tributes. The GR07, admittedly, has a wider, more out-of-the-head presentation with a bit more air. The Sennheiser IE7 also has a larger presentation as well as a better center image but doesn’t have the detail or dynamics of the Trumpet, resulting in a less nuanced and layered sound. On the whole the Trumpet avoids extremes with both its sound signature and presentation, and only sounds better for it.

Value (8/10) – Monster’s Miles Davis Trumpet is a beautifully packaged and unique-looking earphone with a small, lightweight form factor and good noise isolation. Its design may be even louder than that of the old Tribute but the sound makes the Trumpet Monster’s most audiophile-friendly in-ear yet - the signature is more balanced and refined than that of the outgoing model and combines enhanced bass with a spacious soundstage and good resolution. Microphonics in the flat cable can be bothersome and there are sets that offer similar sound quality for less but as an overall package – complete with Monster’s lifetime warranty – the Trumpet is still a solid set of earphones.

Pros: Beautiful packaging & presentation; small & comfortable; lively yet detailed sound
Cons: Very flashy design; can be microphonic


Big thanks to Selenium for loaning me the Trumpet for review!

post #7288 of 16803
Thanks for the reviews on those two, I was actually really curious about both.

Hopefully you'll get around to reviewing the ATH CKM500s so I can have a good comparison between what I have and what you've written for all these other great IEMs.
post #7289 of 16803

Thanks Ijokerl. Great to see a detailed  EPH-100 review up, I was very interested in your view on them.
This gives people a great starting point when showing interest in EPH-100. beerchug.gif


Edited by H20Fidelity - 6/20/12 at 1:09am
post #7290 of 16803

More great reviews! I was also waiting for the one on the Yamaha's... Thanks, ljokerlbeerchug.gif

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