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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 418

post #6256 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by queerquirks View Post

Looking for a budget iem for purely gym use.

 

Owned a brainwavz m2 and the bass is pretty alright.

 

Which has a bigger bass thump and soundstage, brainwavz alpha or ep630?

 

Its not for jogging or any excessive usage, just machines and weights. 

 

Other iems welcomed too! Preferably below ~30usd ~

 

thanks!

 

 


I suggest taking a look at MEElec M6

 

post #6257 of 16803

Hey joker, how does the Velodyne vPulse compare to the Atrios MG7's in terms of overall quality and in terms of bass? Thanks!

post #6258 of 16803

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gasdoc View Post

The GR07 is spectacular and to me edges out the W4 which is also awesome.

Interesting. How do you think they compare?

 

post #6259 of 16803
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TVisz View Post

quick question, are the Audeo Phonak PFE 012 worth $138 AUD??

 

 

Depends on what else you can get for that sort of money. I would rather have an FA Tandem or JVC FXT90 or something.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by TVisz View Post

is it ok to use IEMs that have a higher impedance than the device im usin? say bout 2 ohms...thx in advanced

 


An IEM should have a (much) higher impedance than the output impedance of your device (recommended ratio is usually at least 4:1 if not 8:1).

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by queerquirks View Post

Looking for a budget iem for purely gym use.

 

Owned a brainwavz m2 and the bass is pretty alright.

 

Which has a bigger bass thump and soundstage, brainwavz alpha or ep630?

 

Its not for jogging or any excessive usage, just machines and weights. 

 

Other iems welcomed too! Preferably below ~30usd ~

 

 

 

Soundmagic E10 maybe?

 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by bboytymee View Post

Hey joker, how does the Velodyne vPulse compare to the Atrios MG7's in terms of overall quality and in terms of bass? Thanks!


IMO not well. The vPulse is a tier down in clarity and resolution and the bass, while very good, is a little softer, less textured, and less defined than that of the Atrio. It's still pretty great for $90, though, especially with the headset functionality.

 

post #6260 of 16803

The EP630s are pretty bad. Maybe the ATH-CKM50.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by queerquirks View Post

Looking for a budget iem for purely gym use.

 

Owned a brainwavz m2 and the bass is pretty alright.

 

Which has a bigger bass thump and soundstage, brainwavz alpha or ep630?

 

Its not for jogging or any excessive usage, just machines and weights. 

 

Other iems welcomed too! Preferably below ~30usd ~

 

thanks!

 

 



 

post #6261 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by GigaFi View Post

The EP630s are pretty bad. Maybe the ATH-CKM50.
 



 



They've got a decent amount of sub-bass though I've found mids to be quite recessed, and trebles have a bit of sparkle which can be fatiguing.


Edited by mbamg - 3/11/12 at 10:46pm
post #6262 of 16803

Thx heaps Joker :D

post #6263 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added two reviews of old(ish) discontinued sets - Altec Lansing UHP336 (aka UE SuperFi 3) and Hippo 10EB. 

 

Quote:
 
(3A67) Altec Lansing UHP336 / Ultimate Ears Super.Fi 3

Altec Lansing UHP336 UE SuperFi 3 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Mar 2012

Details: Altec Lansing re-badge of UE's discontinued SuperFi 3
Current Price: N/A (discontinued) (MSRP: $129.95)
Specs: Driver: BA | Imp: 13Ω | Sens: 115 dB | Freq: 20-15k Hz | Cable: 3.8' I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Sony Hybrid
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (3.5/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Comply foam tips, cleaning tool, and soft zippered carrying case
Build Quality (4/5) - Quite similar to the higher-end UE models - thick plastics, detachable cables with two inches of memory wire, and standard I-plug
Isolation (4/5) - Quite good with well-fitting tips
Microphonics (4.5/5) - Low due to over-the-ear fit but not absent completely
Comfort (3.5/5) - The shells are similar in shape to those of the TF10 and SF5Pro but slimmer towards the front and lend themselves to insertion much easier. Maintaining a seal can be difficult with stock UE tips but Hybrids work fine. Comply foams seal well also but soak up some of the SF3's already-scarce treble intensity and make them even warmer

Sound (6.9/10) - Introduced a number of years ago as Ultimate Ears' entry-level model, the single-armature SF3 was tuned as a do-it-all earphone to compete with Etymotic's ER6 and Shure's E2C. Like most single-armature earphones from that time period, the SF3 doesn't do a great job of covering the entire frequency spectrum. The bass rolls off significantly and lacks detail near the limit. Poor sub-bass presence aside, the bass is smooth and level, flowing without bleed into the midrange.

The mids are slightly forward - not to the same degree as with the newer SuperFi 5 but definitely more so than the low end and treble. Overall balance is still very good, however, and the note thickness is neither excessive nor lacking. Resolution and detail are not quite on-par with the Etymotics of the period, partly because the SF3 at times seems to gloss over fine detail and texture to maintain its silky-smooth response, but the earphone performs no poorer than most dynamic-driver sets in its bracket. The clarity, too, is quite good but not accentuated by brightness as it is on the Ety ER6i.

Treble sparkle is completely nonexistent, resulting in a smooth, non-fatiguing curve. The top end of the SF3 is a bit laid-back in terms of emphasis and lacks some energy and a bit of extension, much like the low end. The somewhat subdued treble response means that the SF3 is not airy or open-sounding but it does provide a very decent sense of space with good depth and width. An additional consideration - the SF3 can be quite hissy with many sources as a result of its high sensitivity. I would not recommend it at all unless it was to be used with a dedicated audio player.

Value (8/10) - Introduced in 2006, the Ultimate Ears Super.Fi 3 is a single-armature earphone that still manages to impress at the sub-$60 price usually fetched by the Altec Lansing rebrand. The sound is smooth, clean, and balanced - if slightly mid-focused - and the relatively high isolation, low microphonics, and detachable cable only sweeten the deal. As an overall package, the Super.Fi 3 is very much on par with many modern designs and puts many of the entry-level models UE has produced since to shame.

Pros: High isolation; low microphonics; detachable cable; smooth and balanced sound
Cons: Extremely sensitive; not the best performer at the limits

 

 

Quote:
 
(2C48) Hippo 10EB

Hippo 10EB 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Mar 2012

Details: Short-lived half-in-ear model from Hippo
Current Price: N/A (discontinued) (MSRP: $70)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 110 dB | Freq: 20-23k Hz | Cable: 4.3' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: stock single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down

Accessories (2.5/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), shirt clip, and soft carrying pouch
Build Quality (4.5/5) – Well-made plastic-and-metal housings, supple strain reliefs, a smooth and flexible cable, and heavy-duty 3.5mm L-plug all make the 10 an impressively well-constructed monitor
Isolation (3/5) – Not bad for a shallow-fit IEM
Microphonics (2.5/5) – Quite bothersome and difficult to avoid with over-the-ear wear
Comfort (4/5) – Half-in-ear design with a shallow fit makes the 10 very comfortable

Sound (7.3/10) – The Hippo 10EB is a very well-balanced earphone with a neutral tonality and impressive resolution. The low end has decent depth and no discernable mid-bass lift. It is quick and punchy - low on body but high on resolution and detail. The mids are in balance with the low end and again offer great clarity and detail at the expense of a bit of note thickness. Those looking for a full, warm sound definitely won’t find it with the 10EBs. The response is rather flat overall and the tone is neutral or even slightly on the cool side. There is a small amount of treble sparkle but nothing like what a Brainwavz Beta produces. The top end is smooth and extended – perfectly pleasant for a mid-level dynamic.

The soundstage has good air and conveys a sense of space well. Instruments are well-separated and clearly distinguishable. However, the presentation is much wider than it is deep, resulting in minimal layering and rather poor imaging. The 10EB does not fare well at portraying intimacy and doesn’t offer much of a center image – a common theme with many half in-ear designs I’ve tried. Its presentation is laid-back and distancing. Worth noting also is that the specs can be a bit misleading – though it doesn’t need to be amped, the Hippo 10EB is not a particularly sensitive earphone and requires several volume notches above most similarly-priced sets to reach listening volume.

Value (7/10) – The Hippo 10EB is a solid mid-level monitor with a flat sound profile and a wide, airy presentation. Its low note thickness and cooler tonality mean that accuracy is emphasized over musicality and the heavy-duty build indicates a studio application. The only real complaint is that the ergonomic shells can make over-the-ear wear tough, which in turns leads to problems mitigating cord contact noise.

Pros: Well-built and comfortable; well-balanced,
Cons: High microphonics; difficult to wear cord-up

 


Edited by ljokerl - 3/12/12 at 12:38am
post #6264 of 16803

I see you're well on your way to that 300-review milestone! Keep up the good work!

post #6265 of 16803

Oh my lord, I actually have a pair of UHP336.

 

It was my first decent pair of IEM after the EP-630. Also it is interesting to note that they use the same cable as TF10. I just pulled out some TF10 custom cables and are listening to them now.

 

When they were still being sold, they were priced in the mid $30's. Based on ljokerl's score, their performance/price should still be decently competitive if they had not been discontinued.


Edited by Vloeibaarglas - 3/12/12 at 4:52am
post #6266 of 16803

joker,

 

sorry cant go thru 400++pages of this thread

 

for same price should i buy dunu trident or soundmagic e10?

 

found some love for bassy music..so looking the one with the best thumpy bass

 

thanks

post #6267 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowerSlide View Post

joker,

 

sorry cant go thru 400++pages of this thread

 

for same price should i buy dunu trident or soundmagic e10?

 

found some love for bassy music..so looking the one with the best thumpy bass

 

thanks

 

Use the search function.
 

 

post #6268 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbamg View Post

 

Use the search function.
 

 


Or just read the review, and compare scores, though I'm sure ljokerl doesn't mind all that much. Could be wrong though...

post #6269 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by 50an6xy06r6n View Post


Or just read the review, and compare scores, though I'm sure ljokerl doesn't mind all that much. Could be wrong though...

 

His scores are rather subjective, so it's better to read through the entire review if you have the time.
 

 

post #6270 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbamg View Post

 

His scores are rather subjective, so it's better to read through the entire review if you have the time.
 

 


Well, do both. Read the review to compare sound signatures and such, but also take into account the scores, as well as the scores for other things like build quality, isolation, etc.

 

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