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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 405

post #6061 of 16803
Oh.... So the fxt-90 it is for me then biggrin.gif
post #6062 of 16803

Hey |joker|, I know it's incredibly difficult to compare a portable headphone to an IEM, but I was wondering how you would compare the FXT90 sound signature to that of the HD 25-1 ii? They both appear to be fairly forward in a grado-like way, which is what interests me about them both. I'm assuming that isolation is similar (since you drew the comparison of the hd25's isolation to that of shallow ergonomic buds), anything else you can elucidate? Or am is this comparison too appley-orangey?

post #6063 of 16803
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dosley01 View Post


I really enjoy their warm, tube like lush mids, bass is good and I like their slightly rolled off top end, it makes sibilance a non-issue.  Predominantly I use them for female vocals, Diana Krall, Eva Cassidy, Norah Jones, etc... IMHO, it's what they do best as colored as they are.  I have the ES7 and my IEMS for "fun" genres.  Just looking for a "soothing" IEM.  My IE8s with silicone custom ear molds come close but the silicone has shrank over time and no longer fits as well as it should.  IE8s with silicone tips are not cutting it otherwise.  I have a pair of MDR-EX600s running through a burn in playlist and with Complys on, they might be close but they are also a similar sound signature to the IE8 so I'm not sure if I will keep them.

 

Maybe the RE262 or MD Tributes?

 

 

 


Those two would be my choice as well. Keep in mind that the MD has more bass than an ESW9, to the point where it can get slightly overbearing, and the RE262 has less to the point where you may have to EQ it. If you're used to getting IE8-level bass from your in-ears, the MD is probably the better choice though it lacks the large headstage of the IE8.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by pack21 View Post

It's a pleasure read this thread, seeing @Ijokerl replying day after day constructively to everyone without discrimination.

 

beerchug.gif


Oh but we really don't want your kind here tongue.gif

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vaed View Post

Hey |joker|, I know it's incredibly difficult to compare a portable headphone to an IEM, but I was wondering how you would compare the FXT90 sound signature to that of the HD 25-1 ii? They both appear to be fairly forward in a grado-like way, which is what interests me about them both. I'm assuming that isolation is similar (since you drew the comparison of the hd25's isolation to that of shallow ergonomic buds), anything else you can elucidate? Or am is this comparison too appley-orangey?

 

 

Well the FXT90 has pretty forward mids, for one, while the HD25 does not. It also has very natural timbre, which the HD25 does not. Isolation is similar, with maybe a slight edge going to the FXTs (though if you are in very noisy environments the HD25s' bass will be less prone to getting drowned out).


Edited by ljokerl - 2/22/12 at 4:30pm
post #6064 of 16803

Much thanks, as always, |joker|.

post #6065 of 16803

IjokerI, is the isolation on the ex1000 or fx700 about the same as with the stock earbuds that come with an iphone?

 

 

post #6066 of 16803

^^^It's more with both.

post #6067 of 16803

smily_headphones1.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post

^^^It's more with both.



Thank you for not curbing my enthusiasum about my isolation concern.

 

I think Larry would choose EX1000 for his IEM, there is no question in my mind. smily_headphones1.gif

post #6068 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added Dunu DN-17 Crater and DN-18 Hawkeye

 

 

Quote:
(2C45) Dunu DN-17 Crater

Dunu DN-17 Crater 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Feb 2012

Details: Vented, vocal-oriented earphone from Dunu
Current Price: $76 from ebay.com (MSRP: $76)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 102 dB | Freq: 16-22k Hz | Cable: 4' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 3.5mm | Preferred tips: Sony Hybrid-style single-flange (stock)
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (5/5) - Single-flange (3 sizes), bi-flange, and Sony Hybrid-style (4 pairs in 3 sizes) silicone tips, airline adapter, ¼” adapter, shirt clip, cleaning cloth, soft pleather carrying pouch, crushproof metal carrying case, and integrated cable wrap
Build Quality (5/5) – The new Dunu earphones continue to amaze with their build quality – solid metal housings boast excellent fit and finish and the new silver cables are terminated by a heavy-duty L-plug. Proper strain relief is present all around. The cable itself is softer and more supple than previous cords but the sheath is somewhat sticky and tangle-prone
Isolation (3.5/5) - Good, somewhat limited by the shallow insertion depth
Microphonics (3.5/5) - Bothersome when worn cable-down; not an issue otherwise
Comfort (3.5/5) – The housings are moderately large and on the heavy side. Nozzles are stepped to allow for a deeper insertion but the front edges are wide, sharp, and potentially problematic for those with smaller ears

Sound (6.9/10) – The DN-17 Crater is a vented earphone tuned specifically for vocal performances. It is not surprising, then, that it is the least bass-dominant of all the Dunu models I’ve tried. The low end of the Crater offers good depth and punch, lagging slightly behind sets such as the DN-16 Hephaes, DN-12 Trident, and Brainwavz M2 in overall bass quantity. It is about as controlled as that of the cheaper Trident, sounding a bit bloated at times, but has a slightly more linear curve with less mid-bass emphasis. Note presentation is slightly on the soft side, resulting in a slight lack of crispness and resolution. There is some texture missing as well, giving the bass a somewhat ‘hollow’ feel with more impact than information.

The midrange of the Crater is prominent and very full-bodied. The balance and presentation are very different from most competing sets - the Crater can easily be called mid-centric despite the ample bass punch and vocals are always upfront, as advertised. Nearly any other earphone sounds thinner in comparison. As with the bass, texture and detail levels are mediocre and the sound has a dull nature, partly due to the underemphasized treble. Indeed, the Crater altogether lacks the increased clarity attained as a result of treble emphasis, relying entirely on natural clarity for intelligibility. The results of not having a very dark background are mixed, sounding excellent on vocal-centric tracks but reverting to an ‘AM radio’ feel with genres relying on heavy instrumentation.

The top end of the Crater is dull and lacks emphasis compared even to the similarly-priced DN-16 Hephaes. Treble extension isn’t bad but detail levels are only on-par with the cheaper DN-12 Trident and there isn’t much crispness or sparkle to the top end. Harshness and sibilance are absent but the treble clearly take a back seat, resulting in a distinct lack of energy. Despite this the Crater has good air that compliments its full, fluid sound well.

The presentation of the Crater is generally forward, especially in the midrange, but the softer note character prevents it from sounding aggressive. The headstage is larger than average and while the positioning is on the vague side, the Crater never sounds congested. Compared to the Dunu Hephaes, the Crater sounds large and full, more of an ‘in-ear speaker’ to the Hephaes’ ‘in-ear earphone’. Interestingly, the Crater is also more sensitive than the previous Dunu dynamics and has a tendency to pick up electrical noise.

Value (7/10) – The DN-17 Crater carries on Dunu’s trend of offering unparalleled build quality and attention to detail at a low price, but does so with a new, more restrained design and a very niche sound signature. Those who usually listen with a ‘vocal’ EQ preset applied will enjoy the unusual balance and presentation of the Crater but for most listeners the more mainstream sound of the Hawkeye model is likely preferable.

Pros: Very well-built and well-accessorized; full and spacious sound
Cons: Cable can be noisy when worn straight down; sound lacks texture, clarity, and detail; dull treble



(2C46) Dunu DN-18 Hawkeye

Dunu DN-18 Hawkeye.jpg
Reviewed Feb 2012

Details: Sealed sibling of the DN-17 Crater
Current Price: $60 from ebay (MSRP: $60)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 100 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 4' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 3.5mm | Preferred tips: Sony Hybrid-style single-flange (stock)
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (5/5) - Single-flange (3 sizes), bi-flange, and Hybrid-style (4 pairs in 3 sizes) silicone tips, airline adapter, ¼” adapter, shirt clip, cleaning cloth, soft pleather carrying pouch, zippered clamshell carrying case, and integrated cable wrap
Build Quality (5/5) - The new Dunu earphones continue to amaze with their build quality – solid metal housings boast excellent fit and finish and the new silver cables are terminated by a heavy-duty L-plug. Proper strain relief is present all around. The cable itself is softer and more supple than previous cords but the sheath is somewhat sticky and tangle-prone
Isolation (3.5/5) - Good for a vented dynamic-driver earphone
Microphonics (3.5/5) - Bothersome when worn cable-down; not an issue otherwise
Comfort (3.5/5) - The housings are moderately large and on the heavy side. Nozzles are stepped to allow for a deeper insertion but the front edges are wide, sharp, and potentially problematic for those with smaller ears

Sound (7/10) – Dunu’s DN-18 Hawkeye is the closed-back sibling of the DN-17 Crater. Unsurprisingly, the two earphones are very similar in overall performance, with the Hawkeye’s being a compromise between the uniquely vocal-centric sound of the Crater and the more consumer-oriented sound of Dunu’s previous dynamic-driver models. While the bass of the Crater is nice and punchy, the Hawkeye offers better depth and more rumble, as well as a touch more impact overall. Note presentation is still a bit soft, resulting in a slight lack of crispness, texture, and resolution, but the greater bass quantity of the Hawkeye makes this less unusual.

The midrange of the Hawkeye, like that of the Crater, is forward and full-sounding. There is more warmth as a result of slightly greater bass bleed but on the whole the bass-midrange balance of the Hawkeye is more even. Detail levels and clarity are average at best but the Hawkeye seems to be a bit more resolving and a touch more crisp, especially when things get busy. There is less upper midrange emphasis with the Hawkeye, though the top end is just as laid-back overall as it is with the Crater. Treble extension is decent but there just isn’t much crispness or sparkle to the top end, resulting in a lack of energy and realism.

The presentation of the Hawkeye, too, is similar to that of the Crater, which is actually more impressive coming from its sealed-back form factor. The soundstage is still rather large and never congested, though the Crater has a touch more air and space. The Hawkeye still sounds ‘bigger’ than the DN-16 Hephaes and most other sealed IEMs, especially those normally found at its price point. Like the Crater, it is also oddly predisposed towards picking up electrical noise - a potential annoyance with sub-par sources such as laptops.

Value (7.5/10) – The Dunu DN-18 Hawkeye combines the spacious, mid-forward sound of the DN-17 with added bass punch and a warmer tone, resulting in a less enigmatic sound at a lower price point. With the excellent build quality and well thought-out accessory pack of the earphones, the DN-18 is a great earphone for those interested in finding a fairly unconventional sound signature for not very much money.

Pros: Very well-built and well-accessorized; full and spacious sound; good bass
Cons: Cable can be noisy when worn straight down; sound lacks texture, clarity, and detail; dull treble

 

 

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post

^^^It's more with both.


+1. Apple buds rate around 1-1.5 on this scale for me.

 

post #6069 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

Added Dunu DN-17 Crater and DN-18 Hawkeye

 

 

 


 


+1. Apple buds rate around 1-1.5 on this scale for me.

 



Thank you.

 

 

post #6070 of 16803
Btw Joker you said about the smallest tri-flange tips being the one of the best tips
After cutting of the top part? How do I perfectly cut it and what should I use.... It's the M6 Btw
post #6071 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphus0204 View Post

Btw Joker you said about the smallest tri-flange tips being the one of the best tips
After cutting of the top part? How do I perfectly cut it and what should I use.... It's the M6 Btw


Actually I don't think the smaller tri-flange that they include now came with my M6 back in 2009. In either case I think they're similar to the triples included with the CW31, which don't seal for me. I use the larger triples that come stock on the earphones, but make them into bi-flanges because the third (smallest) flanges tend to constrict sound flow in my ear. I use manicure scissors to carefully cut the stalk past the 2nd (medium) flange. If the large triples fit you comfortably without modification, you probably don't need to do this.

post #6072 of 16803

nice 2 dunu reviews

but i cant find them on  ebay??

post #6073 of 16803


Quote:

Originally Posted by kanuka View Post

nice 2 dunu reviews

but i cant find them on  ebay??



 They're yet to be released - I read somwhere that they'll be released in March.

post #6074 of 16803

Dunu look nice, but they haven't broke hi-fi ground as far as reviews go. I'd probably be disappointed with a headphone if it didn't hit near a 7.5 to an 8

post #6075 of 16803

IjokerI,  is UM3X a better sounding phone vs IE8?

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